4

In JavaScript, there is a function called setInterval(). Can it be achieved in C++? If a loop is used, the program does not continue but keeps calling the function.

while(true) {
    Sleep(1000);
    func();
}
cout<<"Never printed";
2
  • void setInterval() {}... but I assume you are asking for the functionality of the JavaScript function as well... so what exactly would that be? --- Nevermind, found its docs
    – DevSolar
    Oct 20 '15 at 10:38
  • Short answer: Yes, it can be achieved. Longer answer: To really emulate the JavaScript setInterval functionality you need to implement some form of synchronization context and dispatching system, since JavaScript is single-threaded, so all invocations of handlers of setInterval are dispatched to the "main" thread. This is non-trivial to implement from scratch.
    – odyss-jii
    Oct 20 '15 at 10:41
7

There is no built in setInterval in C++. you can imitate this function with asynchronous function:

template <class F, class... Args>
void setInterval(std::atomic_bool& cancelToken,size_t interval,F&& f, Args&&... args){
  cancelToken.store(true);
  auto cb = std::bind(std::forward<F>(f),std::forward<Args>(args)...);
  std::async(std::launch::async,[=,&cancelToken]()mutable{
     while (cancelToken.load()){
        cb();
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(interval));
     }
  });
}

use cancelToken to cancel the interval with

cancelToken.store(false);

do notice though, that this mchanism construct a new thread for the task. it is not usable for many interval functions. in this case, I'd use already written thread-pool with some sort of time-measurment mechanism.

Edit : example use:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    std::atomic_bool b;
    setInterval(b, 1000, printf, "hi there\n");
    getchar();
}
5
  • 1
    Could you please give me an example to illustrate how to use it?
    – user5101908
    Oct 20 '15 at 11:00
  • 2
    Perfect example of the strengths of C++: butt-ugly on the inside, really nice interface on the outside.
    – DevSolar
    Oct 20 '15 at 12:57
  • @DevSolar: Yeah, this example encourages me to explore more about C++. +1 Oct 20 '15 at 14:21
  • What is the purpose of using std::bind here? Does this has any advantage over just writing f(std::forward<Args>(args)...) inside the while loop? Apr 19 '16 at 15:55
  • This does not replicate JavaScript's setInterval. This implementation drifts. For one, it doesn't account for the time it takes to execute cb()/f(), nor does it respect the semantics of sleep_for. This may or may not be an issue, but it should be pointed out in the answer. Oct 19 '16 at 20:31
1

Use std::thread to achieve.

// <thread> should have been included
void setInterval(auto function,int interval) {
    thread th([&]() {
        while(true) {
            Sleep(interval);
            function();
        }
    });
    th.detach();
}
//...
setInterval([]() {
    cout<<"1 sec past\n";
},
1000);
2
  • 3
    Next nitpick: No include for, and platform-specific, function Sleep(). I suggest using sleep_for instead.
    – DevSolar
    Oct 20 '15 at 10:45
  • why it said thread was not declared in this scope i'm using g++ -std=c++11 compiler Dec 31 '18 at 15:30

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