66

In golang I have some http responses and I sometimes forget to call:

resp.Body.Close()

What happens in this case? will there be a memory leak? Also is it safe to put in defer resp.Body.Close() immediately after getting the response object?

client := http.DefaultClient
resp, err := client.Do(req)
defer resp.Body.Close()
if err != nil {
    return nil, err
}

What if there is an error, could resp or resp.Body be nil?

77

What happens in this case? will there be a memory leak?

It's a resource leak. The connection won't be re-used, and can remain open in which case the file descriptor won't be freed.

Also is it safe to put in defer resp.Body.Close() immediately after getting the response object?

No, follow the example provided in the documentation and close it immediately after checking the error.

client := http.DefaultClient
resp, err := client.Do(req)
if err != nil {
    return nil, err
}
defer resp.Body.Close()

From the http.Client documentation:

If the returned error is nil, the Response will contain a non-nil Body which the user is expected to close. If the Body is not both read to EOF and closed, the Client's underlying RoundTripper (typically Transport) may not be able to re-use a persistent TCP connection to the server for a subsequent "keep-alive" request.

  • 2
    According to this link it is still possible to leak the connection with your code. There are some instances where the response is non-nil and the error is non-nil. – mmcdole Aug 30 '16 at 0:35
  • 8
    @mmcdole: That post is just wrong, and there's no guarantee that it won't panic, since whatever response is returned on an error doesn't have a defined state. If a Body isn't closed on an error, then it's a bug and needs to be reported. You should go by the official client documentation, which states "On error, any Response can be ignored", rather than a random blog post. – JimB Aug 30 '16 at 1:35
  • Thanks for the clarification. I had a bug report logged against my go library that referenced that source and I hadn't vetted it. Interestingly, it looks like there was a discussion about this very source on the golang mailing list. It looks that the line you referenced in the docs was recently added in 1.6.2 -- so I assume that is where the confusion came in for the original blogger who wrote the post. – mmcdole Aug 30 '16 at 2:09
  • @mmcdole, that particular line was added recently to try and make the issue as unambiguous as possible. It has always been documented as shown in the official examples. – JimB Aug 30 '16 at 2:22
  • 2
    @del-boy: If you expect that client to make more requests, then you should try to read the body so the connection can be reused. If you don't need the connection, then don't bother reading the body. If you read the body, wrap it with io.LimitReader. I usually use a fairly small limit, since it's faster to make a new connection if the request is too big. – JimB Jan 9 '17 at 14:26
9

If Response.Body won't be closed with Close() method than a resources associated with a fd won't be freed. This is a resource leak.

Closing Response.Body

From response source:

It is the caller's responsibility to close Body.

So there is no finalizers bound to the object and it must be closed explicitly.

Error handling and deferred cleanups

On error, any Response can be ignored. A non-nil Response with a non-nil error only occurs when CheckRedirect fails, and even then the returned Response.Body is already closed.

resp, err := http.Get("http://example.com/")
if err != nil {
    // Handle error if error is non-nil
}
defer resp.Body.Close() // Close body only if response non-nil
  • 1
    You should note that they should return within your error handling condition. This is going to cause a panic if the user does not return in their error handling. – applewood Jul 19 '18 at 19:25
2

At first the descriptor never closes, as things mentioned above.

And what's more, golang will cache the connection (using persistConn struct to wrap) for reusing it, if DisableKeepAlives is false.

In golang after use client.Do method, go will run goroutine readLoop method as one of the step.

So in golang http transport.go, a pconn(persistConn struct) won't be put into idleConn channel until the req canceled in the readLoop method, and also this goroutine(readLoop method) will be blocked until the req canceled.

Here is the code showing it.

If you want to know more, you need to see the readLoop method.

1

See https://golang.org/src/net/http/client.go
"When err is nil, resp always contains a non-nil resp.Body."

but they do not say when err != nil, resp always is nil. They go on to say:
"If resp.Body is not closed, the Client's underlying RoundTripper (typically Transport) may not be able to re-use a persistent TCP connection to the server for a subsequent "keep-alive" request."

So I have typically solved the issue like this:

client := http.DefaultClient
resp, err := client.Do(req)
if resp != nil {
   defer resp.Body.Close()
}
if err != nil {
    return nil, err 
}
  • 2
    This is incorrect, and there's no guarantee that resp.Body is nit nil when there's an error. – JimB Sep 2 '16 at 20:34
  • Thanks @JimB. The wording in the docs is "On error, any Response can be ignored." It would be more accurate to say "On error, the response Body is always closed." – candita Jul 7 '17 at 14:00
  • 1
    No, because there usually isn't a response body to be closed. If you continue reading that paragraph in the docs - "A non-nil Response with a non-nil error only occurs when CheckRedirect fails, and even then the returned Response.Body is already closed." – JimB Jul 7 '17 at 14:19

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