70

I have some questions regarding this program:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;
template <typename T> void foo ( T x )
{
    auto r=ref(x);
    cout<<boolalpha;
    cout<<is_same<T&,decltype(r)>::value;
}
int main()
{
    int x=5;
    foo (x);
    return 0;
}

The output is:

false

I want to know, if std::ref doesn't return the reference of an object, then what does it do? Basically, what is the difference between:

T x;
auto r = ref(x);

and

T x;
T &y = x;

Also, I want to know why does this difference exist? Why do we need std::ref or std::reference_wrapper when we have references (i.e. T&)?

66

Well ref constructs an object of the appropriate reference_wrapper type to hold a reference to an object. Which means when you apply:

auto r = ref(x);

This returns a reference_wrapper and not a direct reference to x (ie T&). This reference_wrapper (ie r) instead holds T&.

A reference_wrapper is very useful when you want to emulate a reference of an object which can be copied (it is both copy-constructible and copy-assignable).

In C++, once you create a reference (say y) to an object (say x), then y and x share the same base address. Furthermore, y cannot refer to any other object. Also you cannot create an array of references ie code like this will throw an error:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x=5, y=7, z=8;
    int& arr[] {x,y,z};    // error: declaration of 'arr' as array of references
    return 0;
}

However this is legal:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>  // for reference_wrapper
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x=5, y=7, z=8;
    reference_wrapper<int> arr[] {x,y,z};
    for (auto a: arr)
        cout << a << " ";
    return 0;
}
/* OUTPUT:
5 7 8
*/

Talking about your problem with cout << is_same<T&,decltype(r)>::value;, the solution is:

cout << is_same<T&,decltype(r.get())>::value;  // will yield true

Let me show you a program:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << boolalpha;
    int x=5, y=7;
    reference_wrapper<int> r=x;   // or auto r = ref(x);
    cout << is_same<int&, decltype(r.get())>::value << "\n";
    cout << (&x==&r.get()) << "\n";
    r=y;
    cout << (&y==&r.get()) << "\n";
    r.get()=70;
    cout << y;
    return 0;
}
/* Ouput:
true
true
true
70
*/

See here we get to know three things:

  1. A reference_wrapper object (here r) can be used to create an array of references which was not possible with T&.

  2. r actually acts like a real reference (see how r.get()=70 changed the value of y).

  3. r is not same as T& but r.get() is. This means that r holds T& ie as its name suggests is a wrapper around a reference T&.

I hope this answer is more than enough to explain your doubts.

  • 1: No, a reference_wrapper can be reassigned, but it cannot "hold reference to more than one objects". 2/3: Fair point about where .get() is appropriate - but unsuffixed r can be used the same as T& in cases where r's conversion operator can be invoked unambiguously - so no need to call .get() in many cases, including several in your code (which is difficult to read due to lack of spaces). – underscore_d Dec 11 '15 at 17:00
  • @underscore_d reference_wrapper can hold an array of references if you are not sure then you can try it yourself. Plus .get() is used when you want to change the value of the object the reference_wrapper is holding` ie r=70 is illegal so you have to use r.get()=70. Try yourself !!!!!! – Ankit Acharya Dec 12 '15 at 14:03
  • 1
    Not really. First, let's use accurate wording. You are showing a reference_wrapper holding a reference to an array - not a reference_wrapper that itself contains "reference to more than one objects". The wrapper only holds one reference. Secondly, I can get a native reference to an array just fine - are you sure you didn't just forget the (parentheses) around int a[4]{1, 2, 3, 4}; int (&b)[4] = a;? reference_wrapper is not special here since native T& does work. – underscore_d Dec 12 '15 at 21:03
  • 1
    @AnkitAcharya Yes :-) but to be precise, effective result aside, itself only refers to one object. Anyway, you're of course right that unlike a normal ref, the wrapper can go in a container. This is handy, but I think people misinterpret this as more advanced than it really is. If I want an array of 'refs', I usually skip the middleman with vector<Item *>, which is what the wrapper boils down to... and hope the anti-pointer purists don't find me. The convincing use-cases for it are different and more complex. – underscore_d Dec 13 '15 at 10:45
  • 1
    "A reference_wrapper is very useful when you want to emulate a reference of an object which can be copied." But doesn't that defeat the purpose of a reference? You're referring to the actual thing. That's what a reference IS. A reference that can be copied, seems pointless, because if you want to copy it, then you don't want a reference in the first place, you should just copy the original object. It seems like an unnecessary layer of complexity to solve a problem which doesn't need to exist in the first place. – stu Jun 14 '17 at 19:43
42

std::reference_wrapper is recognized by standard facilities to be able to pass objects by reference in pass-by-value contexts.

For example, std::bind can take in the std::ref() to something, transmit it by value, and unpacks it back into a reference later on.

void print(int i) {
    std::cout << i << '\n';
}

int main() {
    int i = 10;

    auto f1 = std::bind(print, i);
    auto f2 = std::bind(print, std::ref(i));

    i = 20;

    f1();
    f2();
}

This snippet outputs :

10
20

The value of i has been stored (taken by value) into f1 at the point it was initialized, but f2 has kept an std::reference_wrapper by value, and thus behaves like it took in an int&.

  • could you elaborate with some small code – CppNITR Oct 20 '15 at 15:50
  • 2
    @CppNITR sure ! Give me a moment to assemble a small demo :) – Quentin Oct 20 '15 at 15:51
  • 1
    what about the difference between T& & ref(T) – CppNITR Oct 20 '15 at 16:01
  • 2
    @CppNITR std::ref(T) returns a std::reference_wrapper. It's little more than a wrapped pointer, but is recognize by the library as "hey, I'm supposed to be a reference ! Please turn me back into one once you're done passing me around". – Quentin Oct 20 '15 at 16:32
28

A reference (T& or T&&) is a special element in C++ language. It allows to manipulate an object by reference and has special use cases in the language. For example, you cannot create a standard container to hold references: vector<T&> is ill formed and generates a compilation error.

A std::reference_wrapper on the other hand is a C++ object able to hold a reference. As such, you can use it in standard containers.

std::ref is a standard function that returns a std::reference_wrapper on its argument. In the same idea, std::cref returns std::reference_wrapper to a const reference.

One interesting property of a std::reference_wrapper, is that it has an operator T& () const noexcept;. That means that even if it is a true object, it can be automatically converted to the reference that it is holding. So:

  • as it is a copy assignable object, it can be used in containers or in other cases where references are not allowed
  • thanks to its operator T& () const noexcept;, it can be used anywhere you could use a reference, because it will be automatically converted to it.

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