3

I have a constructor class as so:

public class Student
{
    // Declare variables
    public int studentID;
    public String courseName;
    public int courseScore;
    public char courseGrade;

    // Default constructor
    public Student()
    {
       studentID = 1;
       courseName = "CIS 2085";
       courseScore = 89;
    }


    //========================================

    // Constructor with parameters
    public Student(int id, String course, int score)
    {
       setStud(id, course, score);
    }


    //========================================

    public String toString()
    {
       return (studentID + " " + courseName + " " + courseScore);
    }


    //========================================

    public void setStud(int id, String course, int score)
    {
       studentID = id;
       courseName = course;
       courseScore = score;
    }


     //========================================

    public int getStudentID()
    {
       return studentID;
    }


    //========================================

    public String getCourseName()
    {
       return courseName;
    }


    //========================================

    public int getCourseScore()
    {
       return courseScore;
    }


    //========================================

    public char getCourseGrade()
    {
       return courseGrade;
    }


    //========================================

    public static char calculateGrade(int courseScore)
    {
       if (courseScore >= 94)
           courseGrade = 'A';

       else if ((courseScore >= 85) && (courseScore <= 93))
           courseGrade = 'B';

       else if ((courseScore >= 75) && (courseScore <= 84))
           courseGrade = 'C';

       else if ((courseScore >= 65) && (courseScore <= 74))
           courseGrade = 'D';

       else
           courseGrade = 'F';

       return courseGrade;
    }

    //========================================

}

And I have my implementation class so far, like this:

import java.util.*;

public class StudentImplementation
{
    // Sllow 'console' to receive input from the user
    static Scanner console = new Scanner(System.in);

    // Method main
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // Declare variables

        // Object 1: first. Uses the default constructor.
        Student first = new Student();

        //System.out.println(first);

        // Object 2: second.
        Student second = new Student(3, "Advanced Java Programming", 83);

        //System.out.println(second);

        // Use calculateGrade method to receive grade for object 1

        char grade = Student.calculateGrade(first.getCourseScore);
        System.out.println(grade);
    }
}

So I am trying to use my calculateGrade method to output the appropriate grade based on my objects courseScore.

The Student class is in a separate file from my implementation class.

When I run this program I receive the error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: Student.calculateGrade(I)C
    at StudentImplementation.main(StudentImplementation.java:27)
8
  • Can you explain what is the problem? I don't see what is wrong.
    – dguay
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:53
  • I don't understand what problem you're having. Can you not simply call the calculateGrade method? Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:53
  • I am trying to call the method CalculateGrade to work in my implementation file. so that it will take the courseScore of object 1 (first) and give me the courseGrade.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:54
  • Yes, I am wondering how I call the method since it is in another class.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:55
  • 1
    Its public, so just call it directly (ie: first.calculateGrade()). 2 things to note: methods in Java are always lower case, and you don't need the char g parameter in the method. Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:57

5 Answers 5

3

Here's a cleaner version of your Student class that does what you want it to do. I've taken out the unnecessary variables and methods, and cleaned it up a bit.

The reason I did this is because right now, your code contains a lot of things that don't make sense (eg. adding a parameter to a method so you can set the parameters value in the method itself and then return it, using a setter method in your constructor).

public class Student {
    public int studentID;
    public String courseName;
    public int courseScore;

    public Student() {
        this(1, "CIS 2085", 89);
    }

    public Student(int id, String course, int score) {
        this.studentID = id;
        this.courseName = course;
        this.courseScore = score;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return studentID + " " + courseName + " " + courseScore;
    }

    public int getStudentID() {
        return studentID;
    }

    public String getCourseName() {
        return courseName;
    }

    public int getCourseScore() {
        return courseScore;
    }


    public char getCourseGrade() {
        if (courseScore >= 94) {
            return 'A';
        } else if (courseScore >= 85 && courseScore <= 93) {
            return 'B';
        } else if (courseScore >= 75 && courseScore <= 84) {
            return 'C';
        } else if (courseScore >= 65 && courseScore <= 74) {
            return 'D';
        }
        return 'E';
    }

}

Here's an example implementation to go along with that:

public class StudentImplementation {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Student first = new Student(); //default constructor
        System.out.println(first.getCourseGrade());
        Student second = new Student(3, "Advanced JAVA Programming", 83);
        System.out.println(second.getCourseGrade());
    }

}
10
  • 1
    Thank you. I am wondering what the this. function does? I have never heard of that before.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:07
  • this refers to the object that called the function. so when we do first.getCourseGrade(), this refers to the 'first' object
    – AbtPst
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:09
  • 1
    this refers to the current instance of the object. For example your Student class, each Student object contains the course grade, course name and student ID. That means there can be multiple instances of the Student object each having their own values- the this keyword helps the Java compiler know how to differentiate between them. Here's some more documentation by Oracle if you want more information: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/thiskey.html
    – nbokmans
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:10
  • Ok, thanks for the clarification. So the program compiles, but it outputs 0000 for the grade. Do you know why that would be happening?
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:14
  • Sorry, I had some errors in the Student class code. Replace it again and run it again- I just tested it on my side, and it worked: i.imgur.com/UK9N6fT.png
    – nbokmans
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:20
3

Change your calculateGrade method to:

public char calculateGrade() {
    courseScore = this.getCourseScore(); // This refers to the student
                                         // from whom you called the
                                         // calculaGrade() method -->
                                         // first.calculateGrade()
    if (courseScore >= 94) {
        courseGrade = 'A';
    } else if ((courseScore >= 85) && (courseScore <= 93)) {
        courseGrade = 'B';
    } else if ((courseScore >= 75) && (courseScore <= 84)) {
        courseGrade = 'C';
    } else if ((courseScore >= 65) && (courseScore <= 74)) {
        courseGrade = 'D';
    } else {
        courseGrade = 'F';
    }
    return courseGrade;
}

Then just use first.calculateGrade(). And print the result:

Student first = new Student();
char firstStudentGrade = first.calculateGrade();
System.out.println(firstStudentGrade);

PS: method names do not start with capital letters ;)

3
  • if the object has been initialized, then it should give the correct value of the attribute.
    – AbtPst
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:01
  • Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: Student.calculateGrade()C at StudentImplementation.main(StudentImplementation.java:25) That is what I receive when I try that.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:02
  • Did you change the method CalculateGrade(char g) to calculateGrade() in your Student class ?
    – Fundhor
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:09
0

Change the statement

char grade = Student.calculateGrade(first.getCourseScore);

to

char grade = Student.calculateGrade(first.getCourseScore());

You missed the () during the method call.

0

Use:

public char CalculateGrade()
{
    if (this.courseScore >= 94)
        courseGrade = 'A';

    else if ((this.courseScore >= 85) && (this.courseScore <= 93))
        courseGrade = 'B';

    else if ((this.courseScore >= 75) && (this.courseScore <= 84))
        courseGrade = 'C';

    else if ((this.courseScore >= 65) && (this.courseScore <= 74))
        courseGrade = 'D';

    else
        courseGrade = 'F';

    g = courseGrade;

    return g;
}

And call it as:

System.out.println(first.CalculateGrade());
6
  • This is the error I get when I enter that: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: Student.CalculateGrade()C at StudentImplementation.main(StudentImplementation.java:25)
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:58
  • and in the default constructor, course score is 89.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:58
  • where have you defined the CalculateGrade() method
    – AbtPst
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 19:59
  • can you please try to put the method exactly as i have described? please place it in the Student class. would that be allowed?
    – AbtPst
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:00
  • I did, I tried retyping it, and copy & pasting. I still get that same error.
    – burgoyne
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 20:26
0

After creating your Student object, simply call your method...

Student first = new Student();
first.CalculateGrade();

And remove the g parameter from CalculateGrade(char gg). You don't need it.

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