4

This might be a silly question but I am not able to find answer to it:

I have a Python code which is printing time-stamp like this:

2015-05-19 22:27:00.688441

The code which produces this string looks something like this:

print str(datetime.datetime.strptime(time_value, '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f'))

I would like to do the same in Perl (version 5.14). I can get all parts of this string except the last fractional part (%f).

How do I get exact same string in Perl?

PS: I tried using Time::HiRes module.

use Time::HiRes;
my ($seconds, $microseconds) = gettimeofday;

If somehow I can use $seconds to localtime(), is it possible? If so, then how?

Extension to original question: If I have a variable $time_value -- lets assume that I have retrieved a time stamp string in this variable from somewhere, how can I format this to required format i.e. time stamp with microseconds?

2
  • what problem did you have trying to use Time::HiRes? re extension: what is $time_value? – ysth Oct 20 '15 at 21:58
  • I am new to Perl, so I am not sure about how to use Time::HiRes for this particular case. I am able to use it as per the documentation but not for this case. – Kedar Joshi Oct 20 '15 at 23:02
4

The way most similar to how Python does it is to install and use DateTime. Note that microseconds are not a part of the standard strptime format. DateTime uses %N for fractional seconds. %6N means factional seconds to 6 places (microseconds).

# `DateTime->now` uses seconds, so we have to supply our own
# hires time.
use Time::HiRes qw(time);
use DateTime;

print DateTime->from_epoch( epoch => time )->strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%6N');
5
  • This code gave me output as: 2015-10-20 23:34:10.000000 Anything missing since we are getting all 0s at the end? – Kedar Joshi Oct 20 '15 at 23:34
  • @KedarJoshi Ahh. The format is correct, but DateTime->now isn't using microseconds. I'll put up a better example. – Schwern Oct 21 '15 at 1:14
  • @Schewern : I am trying to get a timestamp using my $mtime = (stat $filename)[10]; how do i convert this into required format any idea? – Kedar Joshi Nov 11 '15 at 23:06
  • The problem is stat function returns mtime as seconds since epoch time.. how do i get microseconds here? – Kedar Joshi Nov 11 '15 at 23:14
  • Nevermind, got it. Time::HiRes has a "stat" function itself – Kedar Joshi Nov 11 '15 at 23:22
4
$ perl -E'
   use DateTime qw( );

   my $time = 1445400376.20984;

   my $dt = DateTime->from_epoch( epoch => $time, time_zone => "local" );
   say $dt->strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%6N");
'
2015-10-20 21:06:16.209840

(Remove time_zone => "local" for UTC.)

But DateTime is a bit heavy. POSIX offers the lightest solution.

$ perl -E'
   use POSIX qw( strftime );

   my $time = 1445400376.20984;

   my $microsecs = ($time - int($time)) * 1e6;
   say sprintf("%s.%06.0f", strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", localtime($time)), $microsecs);
'
2015-10-20 21:06:16.209840

(Change localtime to gmtime for UTC.)

If you don't already have the time, you can use Time::HiRes's time in the first snippet and gettimeofday for the second.

0
4

You could also use Time::Moment. In the interest of full disclosure, I am the author of Time::Moment.

Local time:

$ perl -MTime::Moment -E'
say Time::Moment->now    
                ->strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%6N");
'
2015-10-21 19:48:56.333887

UTC time:

$ perl -MTime::Moment -E'                                                                                       
say Time::Moment->now_utc
                ->strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%6N");
'
2015-10-21 17:48:57.805921
2
  • 1
    That module looks like the DateTime alternative I've been looking for. – Schwern Oct 23 '15 at 17:58
  • 1
    Now, I can add time-stamp to my log files and precisely monitor the time of event occurred at miliseconds. – Robie Nayak Nov 15 '16 at 8:32
2

Using Time::Piece, which doesn't support fractional seconds, by tacking them on at the end:

use 5.014;
use warnings;
use Time::Piece;
use Time::HiRes;

my ($seconds,$microseconds) = Time::HiRes::gettimeofday;
my $str = sprintf '%s.%06d', gmtime($seconds)->strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'), $microseconds;
1
  • from_epoch will take fractional seconds. – Schwern Oct 21 '15 at 1:17

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