I'm playing around with pattern match and I found out, that it's not quite easy to pattern match parameters of a method against an empty map. I thought it would go something like this:

defmodule PatternMatch do
  def modify(%{}) do
    %{}
  end

  def modify(map) do
    # expensive operation
    %{ modified: "map" }
  end
end

But it seems like the first function clause matches arbitrary maps:

iex> PatternMatch.modify(%{a: "map"})
==> %{}

Is there another way to check for empty maps?

  • Would the order of the function clauses play into this issue too? I mean would an empty map always match and therefore need to be the last function clause? – Onorio Catenacci Oct 21 '15 at 16:02
up vote 61 down vote accepted

It works this way by design, but admittedly it can be a bit confusing at first glance. This feature allows you to destructure maps using pattern matching, without having to specify all keys. For example:

iex> %{b: value} = %{a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}
%{a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}

iex> value
2

Consequently, %{} will match any map. If you want to match an empty map in a function, you have to use a guard clause:

defmodule PatternMatch do
  def modify(map) when map == %{} do
    %{}
  end

  def modify(map) do
    # ...
  end
end

In addition to @PatrickOscity's answer (which I would use for an empty map), you can use a map_size/1 guard to match against maps with a number of keys:

defmodule PatternMatch do
  def modify(map) when map_size(map) == 0 do
    %{}
  end

  def modify(map) when map_size(map) == 1 do
    #something else
  end

  def modify(map) do
    # expensive operation
    %{ modified: "map" }
  end
end

Here is an output from iex using Kernel.match?/2 to show map_size/1 in action:

iex(6)> Kernel.match?(map when map_size(map) == 1, %{})
false
iex(7)> Kernel.match?(map when map_size(map) == 1, %{foo: "bar"})
true
  • 4
    Nice addition. Small correction: I think it should be when map_size(map) ... instead of when map_size ... – Patrick Oscity Oct 21 '15 at 7:46
  • Well spotted! Thanks. – Gazler Oct 21 '15 at 7:49

In addition to all the cool answers provided so far, you may also consider the usage of the unary pin operator that looks like a hat or an upper arrow point. You use it to prefix a variable with it to ensure you pattern match against its value, as stated in the relevant documentation:

Use the pin operator ^ when you want to pattern match against an existing variable’s value rather than rebinding the variable

Following is an example:

defmodule A do
  def determine_map_volume(some_map) do
    an_empty_map = %{}

    some_map
    |> case do
    ^an_empty_map -> :empty  # Application of pin operator
    _ -> :not_empty
    end
  end
end

Which you can verify as follows:

A.determine_map_volume(%{})
:empty
A.determine_map_volume(%{a: 1})
:not_empty

Which method you intend to use depends on your personal/organizational preference for the readability of your code.

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