When trying to convert a JPA object that has a bi-directional association into JSON, I keep getting

org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonMappingException: Infinite recursion (StackOverflowError)

All I found is this thread which basically concludes with recommending to avoid bi-directional associations. Does anyone have an idea for a workaround for this spring bug?

------ EDIT 2010-07-24 16:26:22 -------

Codesnippets:

Business Object 1:

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_trainee", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
public class Trainee extends BusinessObject {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.TABLE)
    @Column(name = "id", nullable = false)
    private Integer id;

    @Column(name = "name", nullable = true)
    private String name;

    @Column(name = "surname", nullable = true)
    private String surname;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "trainee", fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @Column(nullable = true)
    private Set<BodyStat> bodyStats;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "trainee", fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @Column(nullable = true)
    private Set<Training> trainings;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "trainee", fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @Column(nullable = true)
    private Set<ExerciseType> exerciseTypes;

    public Trainee() {
        super();
    }

    ... getters/setters ...

Business Object 2:

import javax.persistence.*;
import java.util.Date;

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_bodystat", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
public class BodyStat extends BusinessObject {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.TABLE)
    @Column(name = "id", nullable = false)
    private Integer id;

    @Column(name = "height", nullable = true)
    private Float height;

    @Column(name = "measuretime", nullable = false)
    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    private Date measureTime;

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @JoinColumn(name="trainee_fk")
    private Trainee trainee;

Controller:

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.ui.Model;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseBody;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import javax.validation.ConstraintViolation;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;

@Controller
@RequestMapping(value = "/trainees")
public class TraineesController {

    final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(TraineesController.class);

    private Map<Long, Trainee> trainees = new ConcurrentHashMap<Long, Trainee>();

    @Autowired
    private ITraineeDAO traineeDAO;

    /**
     * Return json repres. of all trainees
     */
    @RequestMapping(value = "/getAllTrainees", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    @ResponseBody        
    public Collection getAllTrainees() {
        Collection allTrainees = this.traineeDAO.getAll();

        this.logger.debug("A total of " + allTrainees.size() + "  trainees was read from db");

        return allTrainees;
    }    
}

JPA-implementation of the trainee DAO:

@Repository
@Transactional
public class TraineeDAO implements ITraineeDAO {

    @PersistenceContext
    private EntityManager em;

    @Transactional
    public Trainee save(Trainee trainee) {
        em.persist(trainee);
        return trainee;
    }

    @Transactional(readOnly = true)
    public Collection getAll() {
        return (Collection) em.createQuery("SELECT t FROM Trainee t").getResultList();
    }
}

persistence.xml

<persistence xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence"
             xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
             xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/persistence_1_0.xsd"
             version="1.0">
    <persistence-unit name="RDBMS" transaction-type="RESOURCE_LOCAL">
        <exclude-unlisted-classes>false</exclude-unlisted-classes>
        <properties>
            <property name="hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto" value="validate"/>
            <property name="hibernate.archive.autodetection" value="class"/>
            <property name="dialect" value="org.hibernate.dialect.MySQL5InnoDBDialect"/>
            <!-- <property name="dialect" value="org.hibernate.dialect.HSQLDialect"/>         -->
        </properties>
    </persistence-unit>
</persistence>
  • Add @Transient to Trainee.bodyStats. – Blauhirn Jan 4 '17 at 21:27
  • As of 2017, @JsonIgnoreProperties is the cleanest solution. Check out Zammel AlaaEddine's answer for more details. – Utku Dec 16 '17 at 6:24
  • How is this spring's fault?? – Nathan Hughes May 2 at 1:04

18 Answers 18

up vote 210 down vote accepted

You may use @JsonIgnore to break the cycle.

  • 1
    @Ben: Actually I don't know. Perhaps its support was not enabled: wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonJAXBAnnotations – axtavt Oct 1 '10 at 15:51
  • 29
    Since Jackson 1.6 there's a better solution: you can use two new annotations to solve infinite recursion problem without ignoring the getters/setters during serialization. See my answer below for details. – Kurt Bourbaki Feb 5 '14 at 12:00
  • 1
    @axtavt Thanks for perfect answer. Btw, I came with another solution: you can simply avoid creating getter for this value, so Spring won't be able to access it while creating JSON (but I don't think that it suits every case, so your answer is better) – Semyon Danilov Feb 28 '14 at 14:58
  • 9
    All the above solutions seem need to change the domain objects by adding annotations. If I'm serialize third party classes which I have no way to modify them. How can I avoid this issue? – Jianwu Chen Mar 26 '15 at 9:41
  • 6
    Perfect example why link only answers are horrible. – ChiefTwoPencils Jul 2 '16 at 17:37

JsonIgnoreProperties [2017 Update]:

You can now use JsonIgnoreProperties to suppress serialization of properties (during serialization), or ignore processing of JSON properties read (during deserialization). If this is not what you're looking for, please keep reading below.

(Thanks to As Zammel AlaaEddine for pointing this out).


JsonManagedReference and JsonBackReference

Since Jackson 1.6 you can use two annotations to solve the infinite recursion problem without ignoring the getters/setters during serialization: @JsonManagedReference and @JsonBackReference.

Explanation

For Jackson to work well, one of the two sides of the relationship should not be serialized, in order to avoid the infite loop that causes your stackoverflow error.

So, Jackson takes the forward part of the reference (your Set<BodyStat> bodyStats in Trainee class), and converts it in a json-like storage format; this is the so-called marshalling process. Then, Jackson looks for the back part of the reference (i.e. Trainee trainee in BodyStat class) and leaves it as it is, not serializing it. This part of the relationship will be re-constructed during the deserialization (unmarshalling) of the forward reference.

You can change your code like this (I skip the useless parts):

Business Object 1:

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_trainee", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
public class Trainee extends BusinessObject {

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "trainee", fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @Column(nullable = true)
    @JsonManagedReference
    private Set<BodyStat> bodyStats;

Business Object 2:

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_bodystat", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
public class BodyStat extends BusinessObject {

    @ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    @JoinColumn(name="trainee_fk")
    @JsonBackReference
    private Trainee trainee;

Now it all should work properly.

If you want more informations, I wrote an article about Json and Jackson Stackoverflow issues on Keenformatics, my blog.

EDIT:

Another useful annotation you could check is @JsonIdentityInfo: using it, everytime Jackson serializes your object, it will add an ID (or another attribute of your choose) to it, so that it won't entirely "scan" it again everytime. This can be useful when you've got a chain loop between more interrelated objects (for example: Order -> OrderLine -> User -> Order and over again).

In this case you've got to be careful, since you could need to read your object's attributes more than once (for example in a products list with more products that share the same seller), and this annotation prevents you to do so. I suggest to always take a look at firebug logs to check the Json response and see what's going on in your code.

Sources:

  • 27
    Thanks for clear answer. This is a more convenient solution than putting @JsonIgnore on back reference. – Utku Özdemir Dec 28 '13 at 2:46
  • 3
    This is definitely the right way to do it. If you do it like this on the server side because you use Jackson there, it doesnt matter what json mapper you use on the client side and you don not have to set the child to parent link manual. It just works. Thanks Kurt – flosk8 Sep 6 '14 at 18:38
  • 1
    Nice, detailed explanation and definitely better and more descriptive approach than @JsonIgnore. – Piotr Nowicki Apr 7 '15 at 6:57
  • 2
    Thanks! The @JsonIdentityInfo worked for cyclical references that involved multiple entities in many overlapping loops. – n00b May 21 '15 at 6:45
  • 1
    Used '@JsonManagedReference' and '@JsonBackReference' , two annotations that saved me.. Thank you so much . – erluxman Jun 19 '17 at 11:07

The new annotation @JsonIgnoreProperties resolves many of the issues with the other options.

@Entity

public class Material{
   ...    
   @JsonIgnoreProperties("costMaterials")
   private List<Supplier> costSuppliers = new ArrayList<>();
   ...
}

@Entity
public class Supplier{
   ...
   @JsonIgnoreProperties("costSuppliers")
   private List<Material> costMaterials = new ArrayList<>();
   ....
}

Check it out here. It works just like in the documentation:
http://springquay.blogspot.com/2016/01/new-approach-to-solve-json-recursive.html

  • 3
    the best solution! – mgranjao Jul 25 '17 at 2:09
  • 2
    This is the best solution ! – A.Chakroun Aug 11 '17 at 15:05
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer. Thank you. Works perfectly. – Alan Smith Dec 5 '17 at 15:17
  • 1
    its a clean way and best solution ,it should be accepted answer – naila naseem Jan 18 at 3:55
  • 1
    Still the best solution! – Akshay Srivastava Jul 23 at 19:29

Also, using Jackson 2.0+ you can use @JsonIdentityInfo. This worked much better for my hibernate classes than @JsonBackReference and @JsonManagedReference, which had problems for me and did not solve the issue. Just add something like:

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_trainee", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
@JsonIdentityInfo(generator=ObjectIdGenerators.IntSequenceGenerator.class, property="@traineeId")
public class Trainee extends BusinessObject {

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_bodystat", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
@JsonIdentityInfo(generator=ObjectIdGenerators.IntSequenceGenerator.class, property="@bodyStatId")
public class BodyStat extends BusinessObject {

and it should work.

  • Can you please explain "This worked much better"? Is there a problem with managed reference? – Utku Özdemir Dec 28 '13 at 2:48
  • @UtkuÖzdemir I added details about @JsonIdentityInfo in my answer above. – Kurt Bourbaki Dec 31 '13 at 15:27
  • 1
    this is the best solution we found so far, because when we used " @JsonManagedReference" the get method successfully returned the values without any stackoverflow error. But, when we tried to save data using the post, it returned an error of 415 (unsupported media error) – cuser Jan 16 '14 at 18:17
  • 1
    I have added @JsonIdentityInfo annotation to my entities but it's not solves the recursion problem. Only @JsonBackReference and @JsonManagedReference solves, but they are remove mapped properties from JSON. – Oleg Abrazhaev Jul 15 '16 at 11:15

Also, Jackson 1.6 has support for handling bi-directional references... which seems like what you are looking for (this blog entry also mentions the feature)

And as of July 2011, there is also "jackson-module-hibernate" which might help in some aspects of dealing with Hibernate objects, although not necessarily this particular one (which does require annotations).

Now Jackson supports avoiding cycles without ignoring the fields:

Jackson - serialization of entities with birectional relationships (avoiding cycles)

This worked perfectly fine for me. Add the annotation @JsonIgnore on the child class where you mention the reference to the parent class.

@ManyToOne
@JoinColumn(name = "ID", nullable = false, updatable = false)
@JsonIgnore
private Member member;
  • Can you elaborate on how this solves the problem? – Kmeixner Jun 9 '15 at 21:35
  • 2
    I think @JsonIgnore ignores this attribute from being retrieved to client side. What if i need this attribute with its child(if it has child)? – Khasan 24-7 Aug 7 '15 at 12:52

There's now a Jackson module (for Jackson 2) specifically designed to handle Hibernate lazy initialization problems when serializing.

https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-datatype-hibernate

Just add the dependency (note there are different dependencies for Hibernate 3 and Hibernate 4):

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.datatype</groupId>
  <artifactId>jackson-datatype-hibernate4</artifactId>
  <version>2.4.0</version>
</dependency>

and then register the module when intializing Jackson's ObjectMapper:

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
mapper.registerModule(new Hibernate4Module());

Documentation currently isn't great. See the Hibernate4Module code for available options.

  • 3
    This solves a completely different problem. – Giulio Piancastelli May 8 '15 at 11:04
  • What problem does is solve then, because it looks interesting. I have the same issue as the OP and all the tricks including above haven't worked. – user1567291 Mar 24 '16 at 18:52

In my case it was enough to change relation from:

@OneToMany(mappedBy = "county")
private List<Town> towns;

to:

@OneToMany
private List<Town> towns;

another relation stayed as it was:

@ManyToOne
@JoinColumn(name = "county_id")
private County county;
  • 2
    I think its better to use Kurt's solution. Because the JoinColumn solution can end in unreferenced data dead bodies. – flosk8 Sep 6 '14 at 18:40
  • This is actually the only thing that helped me. No other solutions from the top worked. I am still not sure why... – Deniss M. Mar 25 at 11:41

For me the best solution is to use @JsonView and create specific filters for each scenario. You could also use @JsonManagedReference and @JsonBackReference, however it is a hardcoded solution to only one situation, where the owner always references the owning side, and never the opposite. If you have another serialization scenario where you need to re-annotate the attribute differently, you will not be able to.

Problem

Lets use two classes, Company and Employee where you have a cyclic dependency between them:

public class Company {

    private Employee employee;

    public Company(Employee employee) {
        this.employee = employee;
    }

    public Employee getEmployee() {
        return employee;
    }
}

public class Employee {

    private Company company;

    public Company getCompany() {
        return company;
    }

    public void setCompany(Company company) {
        this.company = company;
    }
}

And the test class that tries to serialize using ObjectMapper (Spring Boot):

@SpringBootTest
@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@Transactional
public class CompanyTest {

    @Autowired
    public ObjectMapper mapper;

    @Test
    public void shouldSaveCompany() throws JsonProcessingException {
        Employee employee = new Employee();
        Company company = new Company(employee);
        employee.setCompany(company);

        String jsonCompany = mapper.writeValueAsString(company);
        System.out.println(jsonCompany);
        assertTrue(true);
    }
}

If you run this code, you'll get the:

org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonMappingException: Infinite recursion (StackOverflowError)

Solution Using `@JsonView`

@JsonView enables you to use filters and choose what fields should be included while serializing the objects. A filter is just a class reference used as a identifier. So let's first create the filters:

public class Filter {

    public static interface EmployeeData {};

    public static interface CompanyData extends EmployeeData {};

} 

Remember, the filters are dummy classes, just used for specifying the fields with the @JsonView annotation, so you can create as many as you want and need. Let's see it in action, but first we need to annotate our Company class:

public class Company {

    @JsonView(Filter.CompanyData.class)
    private Employee employee;

    public Company(Employee employee) {
        this.employee = employee;
    }

    public Employee getEmployee() {
        return employee;
    }
}

and change the Test in order for the serializer to use the View:

@SpringBootTest
@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@Transactional
public class CompanyTest {

    @Autowired
    public ObjectMapper mapper;

    @Test
    public void shouldSaveCompany() throws JsonProcessingException {
        Employee employee = new Employee();
        Company company = new Company(employee);
        employee.setCompany(company);

        ObjectWriter writter = mapper.writerWithView(Filter.CompanyData.class);
        String jsonCompany = writter.writeValueAsString(company);

        System.out.println(jsonCompany);
        assertTrue(true);
    }
}

Now if you run this code, the Infinite Recursion problem is solved, because you have explicitly said that you just want to serialize the attributes that were annotated with @JsonView(Filter.CompanyData.class).

When it reaches the back reference for company in the Employee, it checks that it's not annotated and ignore the serialization. You also have a powerful and flexible solution to choose which data you want to send through your REST APIs.

With Spring you can annotate your REST Controllers methods with the desired @JsonView filter and the serialization is applied transparently to the returning object.

Here are the imports used in case you need to check:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

import javax.transaction.Transactional;

import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.boot.test.context.SpringBootTest;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringRunner;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectWriter;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonView;
  • 1
    This is a nice article explaining many alternative solutions to solve recursions: baeldung.com/… – Hugo Baés Jul 20 '17 at 14:59

Be sure you use com.fasterxml.jackson everywhere. I spent much time to find it out.

<properties>
  <fasterxml.jackson.version>2.9.2</fasterxml.jackson.version>
</properties>

<!-- https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/com.fasterxml.jackson.core/jackson-annotations -->
<dependency>
  <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-annotations</artifactId>
    <version>${fasterxml.jackson.version}</version>
</dependency>

<!-- https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/com.fasterxml.jackson.core/jackson-databind -->
<dependency>
  <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>${fasterxml.jackson.version}</version>
</dependency>

Then use @JsonManagedReference and @JsonBackReference.

Finally, you can serialize your model to JSON:

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(model);

you can use DTO pattern create class TraineeDTO without any anotation hiberbnate and you can use jackson mapper to convert Trainee to TraineeDTO and bingo the error message disapeare :)

I also met the same problem. I used @JsonIdentityInfo's ObjectIdGenerators.PropertyGenerator.class generator type.

That's my solution:

@Entity
@Table(name = "ta_trainee", uniqueConstraints = {@UniqueConstraint(columnNames = {"id"})})
@JsonIdentityInfo(generator = ObjectIdGenerators.PropertyGenerator.class, property = "id")
public class Trainee extends BusinessObject {
...

You can use @JsonIgnore, but this will ignore the json data which can be accessed because of the Foreign Key relationship. Therefore if you reqiure the foreign key data (most of the time we require), then @JsonIgnore will not help you. In such situation please follow the below solution.

you are getting Infinite recursion, because of the BodyStat class again referring the Trainee object

BodyStat

@ManyToOne(fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
@JoinColumn(name="trainee_fk")
private Trainee trainee;

Trainee

@OneToMany(mappedBy = "trainee", fetch = FetchType.EAGER, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
@Column(nullable = true)
private Set<BodyStat> bodyStats;

Therefore, you have to comment/omit the above part in Trainee

I had this problem, but I didn't want to use annotation in my entities, so I solved by creating a constructor for my class, this constructor must not have a reference back to the entities who references this entity. Let's say this scenario.

public class A{
   private int id;
   private String code;
   private String name;
   private List<B> bs;
}

public class B{
   private int id;
   private String code;
   private String name;
   private A a;
}

If you try to send to the view the class B or A with @ResponseBody it may cause an infinite loop. You can write a constructor in your class and create a query with your entityManager like this.

"select new A(id, code, name) from A"

This is the class with the constructor.

public class A{
   private int id;
   private String code;
   private String name;
   private List<B> bs;

   public A(){
   }

   public A(int id, String code, String name){
      this.id = id;
      this.code = code;
      this.name = name;
   }

}

However, there are some constrictions about this solution, as you can see, in the constructor I did not make a reference to List bs this is because Hibernate does not allow it, at least in version 3.6.10.Final, so when I need to show both entities in a view I do the following.

public A getAById(int id); //THE A id

public List<B> getBsByAId(int idA); //the A id.

The other problem with this solution, is that if you add or remove a property you must update your constructor and all your queries.

In case you are using Spring Data Rest, issue can be resolved by creating Repositories for every Entity involved in cyclical references.

@JsonIgnoreProperties is the answer.

Use something like this ::

@OneToMany(mappedBy = "course",fetch=FetchType.EAGER)
@JsonIgnoreProperties("course")
private Set<Student> students;

Working fine for me Resolve Json Infinite Recursion problem when working with Jackson

This is what I have done in oneToMany and ManyToOne Mapping

@ManyToOne
@JoinColumn(name="Key")
@JsonBackReference
private LgcyIsp Key;


@OneToMany(mappedBy="LgcyIsp ")
@JsonManagedReference
private List<Safety> safety;
  • I have used hibernate mapping in spring boot application – Prabu M May 28 at 5:18

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