When I tried to run the following code :

#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    char *a[10] = {"hi", "hello", "how"};
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    a[0] = "hey";
    for (i = 0;i < 10; i++)
    printf("%s", a[i]);
}

It gave me output as :

heyhellohow(null)(null)(null)(null)(null)(null)(null)

Whereas when I inserted '\n' in the printf statement :

#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    char *a[10] = {"hi", "hello", "how"};
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    a[0] = "hey";
    for (i = 0;i < 10; i++)
        printf("%s\n", a[i]);
}

It gave me the following output :

hey
hello
how  
Segmentation fault

I tried reading online material for this and I found this is because of format specifier and automatically converting printf to puts by the compiler and puts not recognizing "%s\n", but I am still not able to understand. Can anyone explain this in simple terms.

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Passing a null pointer for a %s format specifier in prinf() is undefined behavior. In the one case, the runtime is trying to be nice and display "(null)" for this situation. In the other case the undefined behavior is to crash.

One possible reason for the difference is that a compiler toolchain will sometimes transform printf("%s\n", xxx) to the equivalent puts(xxx) (GCC certainly does this in many cases). I guess puts() isn't being as nice with your null pointers.

Personally, I like it when "%s" displays null pointers as "(null)" - it makes it a little more convenient when adding some quick-n-dirty debug logging. However, if you do this you can't complain when a program crashes, so you shouldn't rely on it for anything else.

  • Are these the dangling pointers which are pointing to null? – Ajay Gaur Oct 21 '15 at 20:35
  • No - if they were pointers that happened to be pointing to memory with the contents "(null)" then you would not get a crash when using printf("%s\n",a[i]). The declaration of a[] has an initializer that sets to 0 all elements that aren't explicitly initialized. The "(null)" displays are printf() handling null string pointers specially. – Michael Burr Oct 21 '15 at 20:53

you are declaring an array of 10 char pointers. the assignment a[0] = "hey",causes the pointer a[0] to point to the string literal "hey" which is stored in read-only memory,and you lost track of the string literal "hi".

The segmentation fault is caused by passing the null pointers to the function printf() in the loop,beyond the third element.This is known as Undefined Behavior.

  • They are null pointers, not uninitialized pointers – M.M Oct 21 '15 at 20:58

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