41

I have an array of objects. I need to get the object type ("shape" in this example) of the last object, remove it, and then find the index of the previous object in the array that has the same type, e.g. "shape".

var fruits = [
    { 
        shape: round,
        name: orange
    },
    { 
        shape: round,
        name: apple
    },
    { 
        shape: oblong,
        name: zucchini
    },
    { 
        shape: oblong,
        name: banana
    },
    { 
        shape: round,
        name: grapefruit
    }
]

// What's the shape of the last fruit
var currentShape =  fruits[fruits.length-1].shape;

// Remove last fruit
fruits.pop(); // grapefruit removed

// Find the index of the last round fruit
var previousInShapeType = fruits.lastIndexOf(currentShape);
    // should find apple, index = 1

So, obviously the type in this example will be "round". But I'm not looking for an array value of "round". I'm looking for where fruits.shape = round.

var previousInShapeType = fruits.lastIndexOf(fruits.shape = currentShape);

But just using that doesn't work. I'm sure I'm missing something simple. How do I find the last item in the array where the shape of the object = round?

2
  • Are you looking for the index of this object or just the object itself? Oct 21 '15 at 20:49
  • Actually, either would work. If I had the index I can access the object.
    – Graeck
    Oct 21 '15 at 21:13

12 Answers 12

93
var fruit = fruits.slice().reverse().find(fruit => fruit.shape === currentShape);
7
  • 36
    And for those wondering why the slice() is needed: reverse() is mutating! slice() gives you a copy to work on. Nov 1 '19 at 15:47
  • 4
    can be done like const fruit = [...fruits].reverse().find(fruit => fruit.shape === currentShape);
    – Joe Lloyd
    Jan 15 '20 at 13:12
  • 3
    maybe looks cleaner than the accepted answer but copying and reversing an array is not an efficient way of finding an element.
    – Pawel
    Jul 19 '20 at 18:29
  • 4
    @Pawel depends on the size of the array and how often the operation is performed. Performance win on a micro level is usually an OK trade-off for readability and maintainability imo
    – kano
    Oct 22 '20 at 20:02
  • 1
    @kano I disagree in this case. The accepted answer is quite readable. It's a simple for loop. What is not readable about a simple for loop?
    – dudewad
    Oct 31 '20 at 0:34
40

You can transform your array to an array boolean type and get the last true index.

const lastIndex = fruits.map(fruit => 
  fruit.shape === currentShape).lastIndexOf(true);
3
  • super elegant solution Jun 15 '19 at 19:35
  • really neat approach!
    – Jan
    Aug 30 '19 at 5:33
  • 3
    Works great for small array and simple condition, but otherwise it's really inefficient because it will process all the array
    – bviala
    Sep 3 '19 at 12:43
22
var previousInShapeType, index = fruits.length - 1;
for ( ; index >= 0; index--) {
    if (fruits[index].shape == currentShape) {
        previousInShapeType = fruits[index];
        break;
    }
}

You can also loop backwards through array.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/vonn9xhm/

5
  • 9
    This is the only correct answer in here. Do people have no regard to efficient anymore?
    – Artless
    Oct 21 '15 at 20:56
  • 1
    agree, functional programming has destroyed efficiency I'd say Mar 11 '20 at 13:05
  • 3
    this is the fastest solution performing at 55,323,764 ops/s comparing to average of 2,200 ops/s for solutions below (25 000x faster) - (tested on collection of 100k fruits on latest google chrome).BUT! If we don't care about cost of reversing collection once and we cache the reversed copy then .reverse().find solution is actually faster performing at 55,853,952 ops/s
    – Adassko
    Jun 17 '20 at 16:44
  • 1
    Also, in most cases code should be optimized for maintainability not efficiency unless you absolutely need it. If you know you will have a short list, use the readable approach.
    – Marcel
    May 27 at 21:17
  • Premature optimization can destroy maintainability which in turn can destroy optimizations where it really counts. Don't sacrifice maintainability for negligible optimizations.
    – JakeDK
    Jul 31 at 8:06
11

Using the Lodash library, you can find the last logical element.

_.findLast([1,2,3,5,4], n => n % 2 == 1); // Find last odd element
// expected output: 5
7

This is a solution that does not depend on reverse, and therefore does not require "cloning" the original collection.

const lastShapeIndex = fruits.reduce((acc, fruit, index) => (
    fruit.shape === currentShape ? index : acc
), -1);
3
  • this is actually the most elegant solution in pure javascript. I don't know why it got downvoted
    – Adassko
    Jun 17 '20 at 16:03
  • It should not initialize with 0. Maybe -1, since it is a de-factor standard for index lookup. Also - the resulting const isn't the fruit object itself, but the index.
    – avioli
    Oct 25 '20 at 22:29
  • @avioli, thank you for both of those points. I edited the answer with those changes.
    – Ed I
    Dec 3 '20 at 10:58
6

An easier and relatively efficient solution. Filter and pop!

Filter all fruits matching the current shape and then pop to get the last one.

fruits.filter(({shape}) => shape === currentShape).pop()

var fruits = [{
    shape: 'round',
    name: 'orange'
}, {
    shape: 'round',
    name: 'apple'
}, {
    shape: 'oblong',
    name: 'zucchini'
}, {
    shape: 'oblong',
    name: 'banana'
}, {
    shape: 'round',
    name: 'grapefruit'
}];

// What's the shape of the last fruit
var currentShape = fruits[fruits.length - 1].shape;

// Remove last fruit
fruits.pop(); // grapefruit removed


alert(fruits.filter(({shape}) => shape === currentShape).pop().name);

2

plain JS:

var len = fruits.length, prev = false;
while(!prev && len--){
    (fruits[len].shape == currentShape) && (prev = fruits[len]);
}

lodash:

_.findLast(fruits, 'shape', currentShape);
2

While the currently accepted answer will do the trick, the arrival of ES6 (ECMA2015) added the spread operator which makes it easy to duplicate your array (this will work fine for the fruit array in your example but beware of nested arrays). You could also make use of the fact that the pop method returns the removed element to make your code more concise. Hence you could achieve the desired result with the following 2 lines of code

const currentShape = fruits.pop().shape;
const previousInShapeType = [...fruits].reverse().find(
  fruit => fruit.shape === currentShape
);
1

I would suggest another nice solution which doesn't bother cloning a new object using reverse().

I use reduceRight to does the job instead.

function findLastIndex(array, fn) {
  if (!array) return -1;
  if (!fn || typeof fn !== "function") throw `${fn} is not a function`;
  return array.reduceRight((prev, currentValue, currentIndex) => {
    if (prev > -1) return prev;
    if (fn(currentValue, currentIndex)) return currentIndex;
    return -1;
  }, -1);
}

And usage

findLastIndex([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,5,4,2,1], (current, index) => current === 2); // return 9

findLastIndex([{id: 1},{id: 2},{id: 1}], (current, index) => current.id === 1); //return 2

0

You should use filter! filter takes a function as an argument, and returns a new array.

var roundFruits = fruits.filter(function(d) {
 // d is each element of the original array
 return d.shape == "round";
});

Now roundFruits will contain the elements of the original array for which the function returns true. Now if you want to know the original array indexes, never fear - you can use the function map. map also operates on an array, and takes a function which acts on the array. we can chain map and filter together as follows

var roundFruits = fruits.map(function(d, i) {
  // d is each element, i is the index
  d.i = i;  // create index variable
  return d;
}).filter(function(d) {
  return d.shape == "round"
});

The resulting array will contain all objects in the original fruits array for which the shape is round, and their original index in the fruits array.

roundFruits = [
{ 
    shape: round,
    name: orange,
    i: 0
},
{ 
    shape: round,
    name: apple,
    i: 1
},
{ 
    shape: round,
    name: grapefruit
    i: 4
}
]

Now you can do whatever you need to with the exact knowledge of the location of the relevant data.

// get last round element
fruits[4];
1
  • If I'm not concerned with using some additional memory etc, I tend to use filter() and pop(), so something like arr.filter(({shape) => shape === 'round').pop().
    – JHH
    May 20 '19 at 12:42
0

Here's a typescript version:

/**
 * Returns the value of the last element in the array where predicate is true, and undefined
 * otherwise. It's similar to the native find method, but searches in descending order.
 * @param list the array to search in.
 * @param predicate find calls predicate once for each element of the array, in descending
 * order, until it finds one where predicate returns true. If such an element is found, find
 * immediately returns that element value. Otherwise, find returns undefined.
 */
export function findLast<T>(
  list: Array<T>,
  predicate: (value: T, index: number, obj: T[]) => unknown
): T | undefined {
  for (let index = list.length - 1; index >= 0; index--) {
    let currentValue = list[index];
    let predicateResult = predicate(currentValue, index, list);
    if (predicateResult) {
      return currentValue;
    }
  }
  return undefined;
}

Usage:

const r = findLast([12, 43, 5436, 44, 4], v => v < 45);
console.log(r); // 4
0

Based on Luke Liu's answer, but using ES6's spread operator to make it a bit easier to read:

const fruit = [...fruits].reverse().find(fruit => fruit.shape === currentShape);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.