1

I'm building a program that has several functions that need to read data from a file. Since the functions are used fairly frequently, opening and closing the file for each call would be too time consuming, so my plan was to make the FILE* object global, and have the file open the whole duration of the program. Apparently, though, it's not possible, since this:

#include <fstream>
FILE * yhtit;
yhtit = fopen("thefile.txt","r");
int main() {
return 0; }

gives error: main.cpp|54|error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘=’ token|

What's the best way to keep a file open the whole duration of the program, without having to separately pass the FILE* object to every function that needs it?

3
  • SInce you are using FILE* this is really just a C question not a C++ question. Jul 25, 2010 at 5:16
  • You should wrap your FILE * pointer in a Singleton Logging class and make it lazily initialized. Effectively boils down to having a global (singleton) object, but its much more neat if you use Singleton (as compared to using a global FILE *.
    – bits
    Jul 25, 2010 at 6:52
  • @bits: How does a Singleton Logging class help with functionality where "several functions ... need to read data from a file"? Also why is a singleton "more neat" than a global? Trying to make a FILE*-like object a singleton seems an abuse of singleton as it's blatently a valid thing to do to want to have multiple files open in a single program.
    – CB Bailey
    Jul 25, 2010 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

8

You almost got it right. Try this:

#include <fstream>

FILE * yhtit;

int main() {
    yhtit = fopen("thefile.txt","r");

    //Do your thing here.

    fclose(yhtit);
    return 0;
}
1
  • 9
    To be fair, a global variable solution was what the question was asking for.
    – wrosecrans
    Jul 25, 2010 at 9:13
5

It'd be better to pass the FILE pointer to your functions than to create a global variable. Global variables are often code smells—signs of questionable coding. You can pass the file to your functions without having to open and close the file multiple times. For example:

#include <stdio.h>

void readData(FILE *);
void readMoreData(FILE *);

int main() {
    FILE *fp = fopen("...", "r");

    readData(fp);
    readMoreData(fp);

    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}
2
  • 1
    Yes I agree that it's a questionable practice and fixing that is on my todo-list, but at the moment I'm just trying to make this thing work.
    – tsiki
    Jul 25, 2010 at 2:53
  • 1
    @tziki: it's not a big deal passing one more argument into your parameter list. Placing global variable is really a bad idea and will give you a hard time when you'll need to modify the source code in the future (expecially with multithreading, also global variables are difficult to trace when you analyze a program!)
    – Dacav
    Jul 25, 2010 at 6:43
0
#include <fstream>
FILE * yhtit = fopen("thefile.txt","r");
int main() {
  return 0; }
1
  • @Dacav: The global variable is part of the question. SCFrench didn't introduce it in his solution, he just fixed its initialization.
    – CB Bailey
    Jul 25, 2010 at 9:30
-1

You can maintain the File * variable in a structure and make that structure accessible from any function.

typedef struct 
{
FILE *fp;
//other members can also be part of this structure.
}myData;

appInit(myData *ptr)
{
ptr->fp = fopen(<>,<>);
//Initialise other variables also

return;
}

appDeInit(myData *ptr)
{

 fclose(ptr->fp);
}


main()
{
myData *ptr= malloc(sizeof(myData));
appInit(ptr);
//Play with ptr in all your function calls
foo(ptr);


appDeInit(myData);
}

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