7

I have a celery task that calls another remote task (it's on a different celery app, in another server..). When I try to .get() the result of that remote task from within my task like this:

@app.task()
def my_local_task():
  result_from_remote = app.send_task('remote_task', [arg1, arg2])
  return result_from_remote.get()

I get this error:

RuntimeWarning: Never call result.get() within a task! See http://docs.celeryq.org/en/latest/userguide/tasks.html#task-synchronous-subtasks

In Celery 3.2 this will result in an exception being
raised instead of just being a warning.

  warnings.warn(RuntimeWarning(E_WOULDBLOCK))

Basically I want my task to be "synchronous" - I want it to wait for the result of the remote task, and i'm ok with it.

Can I tell celery it's ok? There is the solution of chaining of course, except it's impossible to chain remote tasks. The only way to call remote tasks is using app.send_task, which returns an AsyncResult, and that I can't chain as I need the task function itself..

2
  • 1
    I opened a bug about it: github.com/celery/celery/issues/3498
    – jptknta
    Oct 7 '16 at 15:06
  • Celery <3.2 lets you do it, just gives a warning. I downgraded my Celery version just because of this, but I'll try using some workaround now.
    – sudo
    Dec 5 '17 at 23:03
23

Here is a fragment that hushes the warning if you know what you are doing is safe:

from celery.result import allow_join_result

with allow_join_result():
    result.get()

source

1
  • I'm use celery 3. Perhaps log a bug with the developers. The "source" link I provided is to the github project. One of the developers provided the information.
    – jptknta
    Mar 30 '17 at 9:14
3

If you want your task to be synchronous, you can use ready() to hold a loop:

import time

while not result_from_remote.ready():
    time.sleep(5)

return result_from_remote.get()
2
  • Yes, this is exactly what I did eventually. I wonder why they don't enable people suppressing this warning (and error later)
    – Jenian
    Oct 22 '15 at 14:52
  • 1
    Confirming that this works around the warning that appears in the celery log. I think the warning issued by celery is incorrect. There are valid use cases where one would want to wait for task completion and where dead lock is impossible.
    – jptknta
    Oct 7 '16 at 12:59
1

There is the solution of chaining of course, except it's impossible to chain remote tasks. The only way to call remote tasks is using app.send_task, which returns an AsyncResult, and that I can't chain as I need the task function itself..

No, it is possible to chain remote tasks. I've just tried it in a project of mine and it works. I suggest you try it with a trivial test task first to make sure you got the basics down before moving to something more complex. I've created these tasks:

@app.task
def foo(arg):
    return arg + 1

@app.task
def bar(arg):
    return "I barred " + str(arg)

The two tasks are held in a module named app.tasks. (It is part of a Django project.)

Then I wrote a command that does:

import celery
print (celery.signature("app.tasks.foo", args=(1, )) |
       celery.signature("app.tasks.bar")).delay().get()

And I got on the screen:

I barred 2
0

This works with celery 4

@app.task()
def my_local_task():
    result_from_remote = app.send_task('remote_task', [arg1, arg2])

    while not result_from_remote.ready():
        time.sleep(1)

    return result_from_remote.result
1
  • 1
    Although this code might solve the problem, a good answer should also explain what the code does and how it helps. You can use the edit link below your answer to improve the post.
    – BDL
    Oct 19 '20 at 8:18

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