33

I have a dataframe df1 which looks like:

   c  k  l
0  A  1  a
1  A  2  b
2  B  2  a
3  C  2  a
4  C  2  d

and another called df2 like:

   c  l
0  A  b
1  C  a

I would like to filter df1 keeping only the values that ARE NOT in df2. Values to filter are expected to be as (A,b) and (C,a) tuples. So far I tried to apply the isin method:

d = df[~(df['l'].isin(dfc['l']) & df['c'].isin(dfc['c']))]

Apart that seems to me too complicated, it returns:

   c  k  l
2  B  2  a
4  C  2  d

but I'm expecting:

   c  k  l
0  A  1  a
2  B  2  a
4  C  2  d
  • 1
    How about concatenating the values of the two columns c and l and using this as your key? – IanS Oct 22 '15 at 13:34
41

You can do this efficiently using isin on a multiindex constructed from the desired columns:

df1 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'C'],
                    'k': [1, 2, 2, 2, 2],
                    'l': ['a', 'b', 'a', 'a', 'd']})
df2 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'C'],
                    'l': ['b', 'a']})
keys = list(df2.columns.values)
i1 = df1.set_index(keys).index
i2 = df2.set_index(keys).index
df1[~i1.isin(i2)]

enter image description here

I think this improves on @IanS's similar solution because it doesn't assume any column type (i.e. it will work with numbers as well as strings).


(Above answer is an edit. Following was my initial answer)

Interesting! This is something I haven't come across before... I would probably solve it by merging the two arrays, then dropping rows where df2 is defined. Here is an example, which makes use of a temporary array:

df1 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'C'],
                    'k': [1, 2, 2, 2, 2],
                    'l': ['a', 'b', 'a', 'a', 'd']})
df2 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'C'],
                    'l': ['b', 'a']})

# create a column marking df2 values
df2['marker'] = 1

# join the two, keeping all of df1's indices
joined = pd.merge(df1, df2, on=['c', 'l'], how='left')
joined

enter image description here

# extract desired columns where marker is NaN
joined[pd.isnull(joined['marker'])][df1.columns]

enter image description here

There may be a way to do this without using the temporary array, but I can't think of one. As long as your data isn't huge the above method should be a fast and sufficient answer.

  • Thanks for the attribution :) I think you should make your edit a new answer, hopefully the accepted one. I would definitely vote for it! – IanS Oct 22 '15 at 14:14
  • I changed the edit to be the primary answer. Thanks! – jakevdp Oct 22 '15 at 14:31
  • Nice method! I thought it was easier to do it, thanks to all for your help! – Fabio Lamanna Oct 22 '15 at 14:45
  • @jakevdp, Thanks, I tried it out and it works great for this case. I have a slightly more complicated schenario where df2 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', *], 'l': [*, 'a']}), by * I mean a wildcard, so the value can be anything. So the output of df1[~i1.isin(i2)] should be: pd.DataFrame({'c': ['C'], 'k': [2], 'l': ['d']}). Is this possible to achieve by modifiying the above? – alpha_989 Jul 5 '18 at 19:30
  • Your initial answer creates a marker column, but pd.merge() now contains a parameter which is 'indicator'. If you would choose indicator=True, then an extra column is added (called '_merge') which is a marker by itself on the newly created merged df. You would then filter on joined['_merge']=='left_only'. – Sander van den Oord Nov 29 '18 at 9:13
12

This is pretty succinct and works well:

df1 = df1[~df1.index.isin(df2.index)]
  • 6
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. Please read this how-to-answer for providing quality answer. – thewaywewere Jun 10 '17 at 13:26
1

How about:

df1['key'] = df1['c'] + df1['l']
d = df1[~df1['key'].isin(df2['c'] + df2['l'])].drop(['key'], axis=1)
  • I think your answer would be stronger with some more information. Could you edit this answer to include some information about why someone should use this approach, or at least what this code accomplishes? If you can't come up with anything to elaborate on, consider a scenario: If I copy and paste your code blindly into my application, are there any edge cases I should be worried about? When should I avoid using this approach? – theB Oct 22 '15 at 20:31
1

I think this is a quite simple approach when you want to filter a dataframe based on multiple columns from another dataframe or even based on a custom list.

df1 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'C'],
                    'k': [1, 2, 2, 2, 2],
                    'l': ['a', 'b', 'a', 'a', 'd']})
df2 = pd.DataFrame({'c': ['A', 'C'],
                    'l': ['b', 'a']})

#values of df2 columns 'c' and 'l' that will be used to filter df1
idxs = list(zip(df2.c.values, df2.l.values)) #[('A', 'b'), ('C', 'a')]

#so df1 is filtered based on the values present in columns c and l of df2 
df1 = df1[pd.Series(list(zip(df1.c, df1.l)), index=df1.index).isin(idxs)]
0

Another option that avoids creating an extra column or doing a merge would be to do a groupby on df2 to get the distinct (c, l) pairs and then just filter df1 using that.

gb = df2.groupby(("c", "l")).groups
df1[[p not in gb for p in zip(df1['c'], df1['l'])]]]

For this small example, it actually seems to run a bit faster than the pandas-based approach (666 µs vs. 1.76 ms on my machine), but I suspect it could be slower on larger examples since it's dropping into pure Python.

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