7

I came across a situation where i need some knowledge.

Below is the code:

// A function to match the delegate
public static int DoSomething()
{
   Console.WriteLine("i am called");
   return 1;
}

// Usage
Action action = () => DoSomething();
Func<int> func = () => DoSomething();
action();
func();

My understanding of Action used to be that it should match a delegate that accepts no parameter and returns nothing.

And for Func<int> that it should match a delegate that accepts no parameter and returns an int.

DoSomething method returns an integer, hence my question: () => DoSomething() is a delegate that returns an int. Func works as expected, but Action doesn't. Why? What am i failing to understand here?

The code compiles and runs properly, both output i am called. What i want to know is that why Action action = () => DoSomething(); is not a compile time error?

  • 3
    >> but Action doesn't — how exactly does it fail to work? – Dmytro Shevchenko Oct 22 '15 at 14:36
  • the codeline Action<object> action = (x) => DoSomething(x);, shouldn't it be a compile time error because Action<object> requires to match a delegate that doesn't return a value? – singsuyash Oct 22 '15 at 14:38
  • 4
    @singsuyash the C# compiler is smart enough to figure out that (x) => DoSomething(x) means different things depending on the context. When you use it to assign an Action variable, it generates an Action, not a Func and ignores the return result of DoSomething(x). – Dmytro Shevchenko Oct 22 '15 at 14:39
  • You can call the DoSomething method and "ignore" the return value (e.g. DoSomething(x)) and you can use the return value (e.g. var retVal = DoSomething(x)) - Both will work and compile. – Amir Popovich Oct 22 '15 at 14:40
  • What is your question ? Your code is perfectly fine, it compiles and runs – Fabjan Oct 22 '15 at 14:42
10

What i want to know is that why Action action = () => DoSomething(); is not a compile time error?

It compiles because you've got a lambda expression that calls the method but ignores the result. You couldn't use a method group conversion, e.g.

// Compile-time failure
// error CS0407: 'int Test.DoSomething()' has the wrong return type
Action action = DoSomething; 

(The same method group conversion for Func<Action, int> is fine.)

But instead, you're doing something more like this:

Action action = DoSomethingAndIgnoreResult;
...
private static void DoSomethingAndIgnoreResult()
{
    DoSomething(); // Hey, I'm ignoring the result. That's fine...
}
  • It's might worth noting that the error for the method group conversion is something like Expected a method with 'void DoSomething(object)' signature – Dave Zych Oct 22 '15 at 14:46
  • @DaveZych: Done, with the actual error message I get. – Jon Skeet Oct 22 '15 at 14:49
  • Thanks @JonSkeet for the updated answer :) and yes ill be careful in future to not change it like this. – singsuyash Oct 22 '15 at 15:04
9

Action action = () => DoSomething(); is equivalent to
Action action = () => { DoSomething(); };

Func<int> func = () => DoSomething(); is equivalent to
Func<int> func = () => { return DoSomething(); };

3

The C# compiler is smart enough to figure out that () => DoSomething() means different things depending on the context. When you use it to assign an Action variable, it generates an Action (instead of Func<int>) that ignores the return result of DoSomething().

1

DoSomething method returns an integer, hence my question: (x) => DoSomething(x) is a delegate that accepts an object and returns an int. Func works as expected, but Action doesn't. Why? What am i failing to understand here?

The flaw in your understanding is right here: (x) => DoSomething(x) doesn't have a type. It isn't anything. The compiler requires context to figure out what the type of this is. By itself a lambda isn't anything in particular, this is why you can't use var with a lambda expression: the compiler doesn't know what type the lambda should be, so it can't deduce the type.

For example, (x) => DoSomething(x) could also be an expression tree:

Expression<Func<object, int>> e = (x) => DoSomething(x)

So you're telling the compiler how to interpret a lambda based on the type you're assigning it to.

0

All your understandings are correct. It's your specific usage that may be causing confusion. Both Func and Action are just fine. Both calls are just fine. I think the case that may illuminate your issue is:

var x = action(5); // NOT ok var y = func(5); // ok

Your sample code just ignores the return value, which is why it seems like they're the same. No different than

void Foo1(int x) { return; } void Foo2(int x) { return 1; } Foo1(5); Foo2(5);

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