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Under what conditions will lParam for message WM_NCHITTEST be a value which does not fit into a 32-bit integer?

One of our clients is seeing a crash on his 64-bit machine due to an unhandled exception in our WPF application and I am having difficulty tracking down the cause. The exception is being raised from WPF code, as shown in the stack trace:

System.OverflowException: Arithmetic operation resulted in an overflow.
   at Microsoft.Windows.Shell.WindowChromeWorker._HandleNCHitTest(WM uMsg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at Microsoft.Windows.Shell.WindowChromeWorker._WndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at System.Windows.Interop.HwndSource.PublicHooksFilterMessage(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndWrapper.WndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.DispatcherCallbackOperation(Object o)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(Object source, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)

The source of the offending method, _HandleNCHitTest, is here.

The only way I can see an overflow exception being thrown is in the code that converts lParam to a Point, which calls IntPtr.ToInt32() here. If lParam does not fit into an Int32, this exception is raised. However, I cannot think of a situation when this might happen. What could make that happen?

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  • FWIW, the crash occurs for the client when both of these are true: 1) he is scrolling up/down quickly inside a text editor embedded in the program, and 2) the program window is maximized. The crash occurs even with a single monitor. If it is not maximized it does not crash and no other actions besides scrolling (that he's seen) causes the crash.
    – kcnygaard
    Oct 22, 2015 at 19:38
  • Have you discarded the possibility of DpiHelper.DevicePixelsToLogical failing? Oct 23, 2015 at 8:44
  • No, I haven't. Do you know when that might happen?
    – kcnygaard
    Oct 23, 2015 at 23:27
  • I'm not entirely versed in .NET's floating point model. Looking at the source code again, though, doesn't seem like that's a very probable candidate for an overflow, even on high DPI displays. Oct 24, 2015 at 12:31
  • I have the same problem. MSDN is also not helping me: Tey talk about the "high order word" and define a WORD to be 16bit and WPARAM to be an IntPtr, but what is the high order word on a 64bit IntPtr? I'll change the according methods to take a long, use ToInt64() and take the lowest-order 2 words (throw away the 4 additional bytes). Maybe that helps...
    – JCH2k
    Feb 10, 2016 at 13:42

1 Answer 1

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Short answer: Use the WindowChrome integrated since .NET 4.5.


Long answer if you can't switch to .NET 4.5, this seemed to work for me, see my comment on the original question. You can never be sure, because the problem only shows sometimes only on some machines, not all x64 machines:

I modified the source of WPF Shell Integration Library v2. The changed lines are marked with <---- at the end.

WindowChromeWorker.cs:

    private IntPtr _HandleSize(WM uMsg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, out bool handled)
    {
        const int SIZE_MAXIMIZED = 2;

        // Force when maximized.
        // We can tell what's happening right now, but the Window doesn't yet know it's
        // maximized.  Not forcing this update will eventually cause the
        // default caption to be drawn.
        WindowState? state = null;
        if (wParam.ToInt64() == SIZE_MAXIMIZED)  <-----
        {
            state = WindowState.Maximized;
        }
        _UpdateSystemMenu(state);

        // Still let the default WndProc handle this.
        handled = false;
        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }

Utilities.cs:

    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Performance", "CA1811:AvoidUncalledPrivateCode")]
    public static int GET_X_LPARAM(IntPtr lParam)
    {
        return LOWORD(lParam.ToInt64());    <----
    }

    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Performance", "CA1811:AvoidUncalledPrivateCode")]
    public static int GET_Y_LPARAM(IntPtr lParam)
    {
        return HIWORD(lParam.ToInt64());    <----
    }

    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Performance", "CA1811:AvoidUncalledPrivateCode")]
    public static int HIWORD(long i)    <----
    {
        return (short)((i >> 16) & 0xFFFF);    <----
    }

    [SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Performance", "CA1811:AvoidUncalledPrivateCode")]
    public static int LOWORD(long i)    <----
    {
        return (short)(i & 0xFFFF);
    }

TaskbarItemInfo.cs:

    private IntPtr _WndProc(IntPtr hwnd, int uMsg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool handled)
    {
        WM message = (WM)uMsg;

        if (message == WM_TASKBARBUTTONCREATED)
        {
            _OnIsAttachedChanged(true);
            _isAttached = true;

            handled = false;
        }
        else
        {
            switch (message)
            {
                case WM.COMMAND:
                    if (Utility.HIWORD(wParam.ToInt64()) == THUMBBUTTON.THBN_CLICKED)  <-----
                    {
                        int index = Utility.LOWORD(wParam.ToInt64());   <----
                        ThumbButtonInfos[index].InvokeClick();
                        handled = true;
                    }
                    break;
                case WM.SIZE:
                    _UpdateThumbnailClipping(_isAttached);
                    handled = false;
                    break;
            }
        }

        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }
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  • I get this error on .Net 4.7.2 too. Using the built in WindowChrome. Looking at referencesource I see that lParam.ToInt32() in Utilties.cs is still used instead of the 64bit method. So I guess just switching to .Net v4.5 or newer is not yet the solution (maybe anymore?)
    – tseifried
    Dec 17, 2018 at 15:51
  • There is a workaround for the problem here: developercommunity.visualstudio.com/content/problem/167357/… Feb 19, 2020 at 12:44

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