350

I am trying to use the new async features and I hope solving my problem will help others in the future. This is my code which is working:

  async function asyncGenerator() {
    // other code
    while (goOn) {
      // other code
      var fileList = await listFiles(nextPageToken);
      var parents = await requestParents(fileList);
      // other code
    }
    // other code
  }

  function listFiles(token) {
    return gapi.client.drive.files.list({
      'maxResults': sizeResults,
      'pageToken': token,
      'q': query
    });
  }

The problem is, that my while loop runs too fast and the script sends too many requests per second to the google API. Therefore I would like to build a sleep function which delays the request. Thus I could also use this function to delay other requests. If there is another way to delay the request, please let me know.

Anyway, this is my new code which does not work. The response of the request is returned to the anonymous async function within the setTimeout, but I just do not know how I can return the response to the sleep function resp. to the initial asyncGenerator function.

  async function asyncGenerator() {
    // other code
    while (goOn) {
      // other code
      var fileList = await sleep(listFiles, nextPageToken);
      var parents = await requestParents(fileList);
      // other code
    }
    // other code
  }

  function listFiles(token) {
    return gapi.client.drive.files.list({
      'maxResults': sizeResults,
      'pageToken': token,
      'q': query
    });
  }

  async function sleep(fn, par) {
    return await setTimeout(async function() {
      await fn(par);
    }, 3000, fn, par);
  }

I have already tried some options: storing the response in a global variable and return it from the sleep function, callback within the anonymous function, etc.

12 Answers 12

682

Your sleep function does not work because setTimeout does not (yet?) return a promise that could be awaited. You will need to promisify it manually:

function timeout(ms) {
    return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
}
async function sleep(fn, ...args) {
    await timeout(3000);
    return fn(...args);
}

Btw, to slow down your loop you probably don't want to use a sleep function that takes a callback and defers it like this. I'd rather recommend to do something like

while (goOn) {
  // other code
  var [parents] = await Promise.all([
      listFiles(nextPageToken).then(requestParents),
      timeout(5000)
  ]);
  // other code
}

which lets the computation of parents take at least 5 seconds.

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    Love the Promise.all approach. So simple and elegant! – Anshul Koka Jul 27 '17 at 15:32
  • 4
    what does the notation of var [parents] represent? I haven't seen it before and it's a difficult thing to google – natedog Aug 16 '17 at 2:05
  • 6
    @NateUsher It's array destructuring – Bergi Aug 16 '17 at 2:06
  • 1
    @tinkerr "timeout needs to be declared async if it needs to be awaited" - Nope. A function only needs to return a promise that can be awaited (or actually, a thenable is enough). How it achieves that is up to the implementation of the function, it does not need to be an async function. – Bergi Nov 23 '17 at 17:09
  • 2
    @naisanza No, async/await is based on promises. The only thing it replaces are then calls. – Bergi Mar 13 '18 at 14:05
174

Since Node 7.6, you can combine the functions promisify function from the utils module with setTimeout() .

Node.js

const sleep = require('util').promisify(setTimeout)

Javascript

const sleep = m => new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, m))

Usage

(async () => {
    console.time("Slept for")
    await sleep(3000)
    console.timeEnd("Slept for")
})()
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    In nodeJS await require('util').promisify(setTimeout)(3000) can also be achieved without require by: await setTimeout[Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(setTimeout)[0]](3000) – Shl Aug 24 '18 at 13:16
  • 7
    Interesting @Shl. I think it is less readable than my solution though. If people disagree I can add it to the solution? – Harry Aug 24 '18 at 13:19
  • 2
    The require version is clearly much better than the getOwnPropertySymbols version... if it ain't broke...! – Matt Fletcher Jan 25 '19 at 15:20
  • 2
    Hey there @Harry. It appears you incorporated the one liner from FlavorScape's answer in your own answer. I don't want to presume of your intentions, but that isn't really fair to them. Could you rollback your edit? Right now it looks a bit like plagiarism.. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Jun 18 '19 at 22:50
  • 2
    I've removed the one-liner as the answer is right below, however I have seen many popular answers update their answers to include other new answers as most readers don't bother looking past the first few responses. – Harry Sep 3 '19 at 8:43
165

The quick one-liner, inline way

 await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 1000));
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    let sleep = ms => new Promise( r => setTimeout(r, ms)); // a one liner function – Soldeplata Saketos Aug 28 '18 at 13:58
  • 9
    even shorter :-) await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 5000)) – Liran Brimer Oct 7 '18 at 12:37
  • 1
    what does it mean when you guys use "resolve" x 2 times in the same line? Like: await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 1000)); does it ref. to itself or what? I would do something like this instead: function myFunc(){}; await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(myFunc, 1000)); – PabloDK Apr 29 at 16:30
  • @PabloDK that would block forever because the promise never resolves. – FlavorScape Sep 10 at 17:22
36

setTimeout is not an async function, so you can't use it with ES7 async-await. But you could implement your sleep function using ES6 Promise:

function sleep (fn, par) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    // wait 3s before calling fn(par)
    setTimeout(() => resolve(fn(par)), 3000)
  })
}

Then you'll be able to use this new sleep function with ES7 async-await:

var fileList = await sleep(listFiles, nextPageToken)

Please, note that I'm only answering your question about combining ES7 async/await with setTimeout, though it may not help solve your problem with sending too many requests per second.


Update: Modern node.js versions has a buid-in async timeout implementation, accessible via util.promisify helper:

const {promisify} = require('util');
const setTimeoutAsync = promisify(setTimeout);
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You shouldn't do that, when fn throws the errror would not be caught. – Bergi Oct 23 '15 at 0:19
  • @Bergi I think it bubbles up to the new Promise where you can sleep.catch it. – Florian Wendelborn Mar 4 '17 at 23:29
  • 4
    @Dodekeract No, it's in an asynchronous setTimeout callback and the new Promise callback has been done for long. It will bubble to the global context and be thrown as an unhandled exception. – Bergi Mar 5 '17 at 11:22
  • > problem with sending too many requests per second. You want to use "debounce" perhaps to prevent things like UI firing too many ruquests. – FlavorScape Aug 5 '19 at 18:17
6

If you would like to use the same kind of syntax as setTimeout you can write a helper function like this:

const setAsyncTimeout = (cb, timeout = 0) => new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => {
        cb();
        resolve();
    }, timeout);
});

You can then call it like so:

const doStuffAsync = async () => {
    await setAsyncTimeout(() => {
        // Do stuff
    }, 1000);

    await setAsyncTimeout(() => {
        // Do more stuff
    }, 500);

    await setAsyncTimeout(() => {
        // Do even more stuff
    }, 2000);
};

doStuffAsync();

I made a gist: https://gist.github.com/DaveBitter/f44889a2a52ad16b6a5129c39444bb57

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    a function name like delayRun would make more sense here, since it will delay the running of the callback function by X seconds. Not a very await-ey example, IMO. – mix3d Apr 18 '19 at 20:53
2
var testAwait = function () {
    var promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
            resolve('Inside test await');
        }, 1000);
    });
    return promise;
}

var asyncFunction = async function() {
    await testAwait().then((data) => {
        console.log(data);
    })
    return 'hello asyncFunction';
}

asyncFunction().then((data) => {
    console.log(data);
});

//Inside test await
//hello asyncFunction
| improve this answer | |
1

This is my version with nodejs now in 2020 in AWS labdas

const sleep = require('util').promisify(setTimeout)

async function f1 (some){
...
}

async function f2 (thing){
...
}

module.exports.someFunction = async event => {
    ...
    await f1(some)
    await sleep(5000)
    await f2(thing)
    ...
}
| improve this answer | |
  • What is promisify doing to setTimeout for your custom sleep function that causes it to no longer need a function as the first argument? For example, if you run setTimeout(5000); (not having a function as the first argument) you get Uncaught TypeError [ERR_INVALID_CALLBACK]: Callback must be a function. Received 5000. – Lonnie Best Jul 25 at 6:15
0

The following code works in Chrome and Firefox and maybe other browsers.

function timeout(ms) {
    return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
}
async function sleep(fn, ...args) {
    await timeout(3000);
    return fn(...args);
}

But in Internet Explorer I get a Syntax Error for the "(resolve **=>** setTimeout..."

| improve this answer | |
0

Made a util inspired from Dave's answer

Basically passed in a done callback to call when the operation is finished.

// Function to timeout if a request is taking too long
const setAsyncTimeout = (cb, timeout = 0) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  cb(resolve);
  setTimeout(() => reject('Request is taking too long to response'), timeout);
});

This is how I use it:

try {
  await setAsyncTimeout(async done => {
    const requestOne = await someService.post(configs);
    const requestTwo = await someService.get(configs);
    const requestThree = await someService.post(configs);
    done();
  }, 5000); // 5 seconds max for this set of operations
}
catch (err) {
  console.error('[Timeout] Unable to complete the operation.', err);
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Update 2020

You can await setTimeout with Node.js 15 or above:

const timersPromises = require('timers/promises');

(async () => {
  const result = await timersPromises.setTimeout(2000, 'resolved')
  // Executed after 2 seconds
  console.log(result); // "resolved"
})()

Timers Promises API: https://nodejs.org/api/timers.html#timers_timers_promises_api (library already built in Node)


Note: Stability: 1 - Use of the feature is not recommended in production environments.

| improve this answer | |
-1
await setTimeout(()=>{}, 200);

Will work if your Node version is 15 and above.

| improve this answer | |
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-4

This is a quicker fix in one-liner.

Hope this will help.

// WAIT FOR 200 MILISECONDS TO GET DATA //
await setTimeout(()=>{}, 200);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Doesn't work. This: await setTimeout(()=>{console.log('first')}, 200); console.log ('second') prints second then first – gregn3 Aug 30 '19 at 20:52
  • 1
    @gregn3 that is the point yes. This is a non blocking solution where code outside the function can continue to execute while a "blocking operation" is completed outside the main program flow. Although the syntax you and Rommy and Mohamad have provided isn't strictly correct due to the requirement for an await to be rapped in an async function (might be a fairly recent addition), also I'm using node.js. This is my tweaked solution. var test = async () => { await setTimeout(()=>{console.log('first')}, 1000); console.log ('second') } I've extended the timeout to show it's usefulness. – azariah Nov 9 '19 at 5:57

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