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I'd like to ask you for an advice regarding attribute accessors' naming.

I started to develop a project that is supposed to have quite a ramified hierarchy of classes, for example, the SomeFramework class, a bunch of classes like SomeFramework::Logger and, let's say, classes similar to SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent::SomeAPI classes.

My goal is to design the most efficient communication between all these classes. I'll explain how I'm doing it now, so maybe you would like to share some opinions on how to make it better.

When I initialize the SomeFramework class, I have an object reference which I use from my application.

my $someframework = SomeFramework->new(parameter => 'value');

The SomeFramework class has some attributes, such as logger, configuration, etc, here are some examples of their definitions:

has 'logger' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework::Logger',
    reader      => 'get_logger',
    writer      => '_set_logger',
    builder     => '_build_logger',
    lazy        => 1
);

sub _build_logger {

    my $self = shift;

    SomeFramework::Logger->new(someframework => $self);

}

I'm passing the reference to the parent object to the child object, because I need the child to have access to the parent and its methods & accessors. So in the SomeFramework::Logger I have such attribute:

has 'someframework' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework',
    reader      => 'get_someframework',
    writer      => '_set_someframework',
    required    => 1
);

It lets me to have access to any object from within the SomeFramework::Logger class, usually it looks something like that:

my $configuration =
     $self->
     get_someframework->
     get_configuration->
     get_blah_blah;

To extrapolate it, let's look into the SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent::SomeAPI class. This class has its own "parent" attribute (let's call it somecomponent) which is supposed to have a reference to a SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent object as the value. The SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent class has the attribute for its own parent attribute (we can call it somesubsystem) which is supposed to contain a reference to a SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem object. And, finally, this class has the attribute for its own parent too (someframework), so it contains the reference to a SomeFramework object.

It all makes it possible to have something like that inside of the SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent::SomeAPI class:

my $configuration =
    $self->
    get_someframework->
    get_somesubsystem->
    get_somecomponent->
    get_configuration->
    get_blah_blah;

The first thing I'd like to know: is it a good practice? I hope, it is, but maybe you would advice me to go some more smooth way?

The second question is a bit more complicated (as for me), but I hope you'll help me with it. :) I like canonical names of accessors recommended by D.Conway in his "Perl Best Practices", but I'd like to do something like that:

my $configuration = $self->sc->ss->sf->conf->blah_blah;

Surely I can name all readers in this laconical manner:

has 'some_framework' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework',
    reader      => 'sf',
    writer      => '_set_someframework',
    required    => 1
);

But I don't like the idea of managing without the "standard" accessors names. :(

Also I can use MooseX::Aliases, it works fine for something like that:

has 'some_framework' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework',
    reader      => 'get_someframework',
    writer      => '_set_someframework',
    required    => 1,
    alias       => 'sf'
);

It looks fine, but there's an issue with attributes which names do NOT needed to be shortened. For example:

has 'api' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent::API',
    reader      => '_get_api',
    writer      => '_set_api',
    required    => 1,
    alias       => 'api'
);

In this case Moose throws an exception: Conflicting init_args: (api, api) at constructor. :( As I understand, MooseX::Aliases tries to create an attribute with the same value of the init_args parameter, so it fails. By the way, sometimes it happens, but sometimes it works fine, I haven't discovered when exactly it doesn't work.

Maybe I should have something like that:

has 'api' => (
    is          => 'ro',
    isa         => 'SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem::SomeComponent::API',
    reader      => '_get_api',
    writer      => '_set_api',
    required    => 1,
    handles     => {
        api => 'return_self' # It's supposed to have some method that only
                             # returns the reference to its own object
    }
);

? But it doesn't seem to be the best option too, because it helps me only if the attribute contains a reference some object for which I can define the return_self method. If the attribute contains a reference to some "foreign" object or some other value (e.g., a hash), it won't be possible to call that method. :(

Ugh... Sorry for such a long rant! I hope, you have managed to read to here. :)

I'll be very happy to get to know what do you thing and what would you suggest to do. Feel free to share any your ideas on this topic, any fresh ideas will be very appreciated!

Updated on 25.10.2015

As for the bigger question, let me see if I understood. There are an Apple and a Banana. The Fridge has both of them inside. But you want the Apple to know about the Fridge, and the Worm should know about the Apple, so that it can go from Worm up to Apple up to Fridge and turn the $fridge->light off when it wants to sleep. Is that correct? Sounds like a horrible idea that breaks all kinds of design patterns

Well, to be frank, I didn't think it's horrible. As for me, it's quite good when it's possible to have access from some class to some other class within the same framework. Why not? For example, let's imagine we have some class for the jobs-queue runner (let's call it SomeFramework::JobsQueue::Executor) and some class for jobs. Is it really bad to do something like:

package SomeFramework::JobsQueue::Executor;

use Moose;
use MooseX::Params::Validate;

has queue {
    isa      => 'SomeFramework::JobsQueue',
    required => 1,
    reader   => 'get_queue',
    writer   => '_set_queue'
}
# This attribute is being set by the framework when the framework
# creates the SomeFramework::JobsQueue::Executor-based object

sub execute {
    my($self, $job, $options) = validated_hash(
        \@_,
        job     => { isa => 'SomeFramework::JobsQueue::Job' },
        options => { isa => 'HashRef' }
    );
    my $queue = $self->get_queue;
    $queue->mark_as_running($job->get_id);
    $job->execute(options => $options);
    $queue->mark_as_completed($job->get_id);
}

? So, our queue-runner object is aware about the queue object it "belongs" to, so it can call some methods of this queue object.

Or let's look at much more simple example:

package SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem;

use Moose;

has 'some_framework' => {
    isa      => 'SomeFramework',
    required => 1,
    reader   => 'get_some_framework',
    writer   => '_set_some_framework'
}

sub some_method {
    my $self = shift;
    $self->get_some_framework->get_logger->log_trace("Hello, world!");
}

So, our object knows how to call methods of the framework's object that has initialized that object, moreover it can call some methods of the framework's object and even some methods of other objects initialized and stored by the framework's object.

If it's really bad, would you be so kind as to help me to understand why? Thank you!

  • Using MooseX::Aliases does not make using aliases mandatory. If you don't want an alias for the api attribute, don't put one. It will work fine. :) – simbabque Oct 23 '15 at 17:13
  • As for the bigger question, let me see if I understood. There are an Apple and a Banana. The Fridge has both of them inside. But you want the Apple to know about the Fridge, and the Worm should know about the Apple, so that it can go from Worm up to Apple up to Fridge and turn the $fridge->light off when it wants to sleep. Is that correct? Sounds like a horrible idea that breaks all kinds of design patterns. – simbabque Oct 23 '15 at 17:15
  • Thank you very much, @simbabque. I've added some explainations to the original post. I'll be glad to get your comments. – Volodymyr Melnyk Oct 25 '15 at 11:25
  • Regarding "If it's really bad ... why?", the answer is that it's really bad. To fully-understand why you should do a search for "Object Oriented Design Principles", but I'll do my best to to be more specific. SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem is figuratively being used as a bucket to hold functionality rather than to model something. SomeFramework is effectively a collection of global variables and methods (you can do a separate search if you don't know why globals are bad). get_some_framework exposes all of that global stuff to any consumers of the SomeFramework::SomeSubsystem class. – Jonathan Jan 22 '16 at 21:22

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