121

Is there a way to specify the order of fields in a serialized JSON object using JSON.NET?

It would be sufficient to specify that a single field always appear first.

  • 7
    i think he's probably interested in showing the ID field (or similar) first, and then all the other fields. this is friendlier for end-users than looking for it after fields that begin with A..I – Michael Bahig Nov 14 '12 at 14:53
  • 2
    JSON properties are defined to be unordered. I think it's absolutely fine to force a particular OUTPUT order during serialization (for the sake of eyeballing the JSON perhaps), but it would be a bad decision to create a DEPENDENCY on any particular order on deserialization. – DaBlick Jun 30 '15 at 12:58
  • 5
    A couple of valid reasons: (1) faking a "$type" property which must be the first property in the JSON, (2) trying to generate JSON that compresses as much as possible – Stephen Chung Feb 13 '16 at 14:27
  • 4
    Another reason might be (3) a canonical representation which uses JSON syntax - the same object must be guaranteed to produce the same JSON string. A deterministic order of the attributes is a necessary prerequisite for this. – MarkusSchaber Mar 6 '18 at 14:58
  • 1
    Kevin, can you update the accepted answer on this question? – Millie Smith Jul 9 at 22:13

13 Answers 13

-6

I followed the JsonConvert.SerializeObject(key) method call via reflection (where key was an IList) and found that JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeList gets called. It takes a list and loops through via

for (int i = 0; i < values.Count; i++) { ...

where values is the IList parameter brought in.

Short answer is...No, there's no built in way to set the order the fields are listed in the JSON string.

  • 17
    Short answer, but possibly outdated. Check out Steve's answer (supported by James Newton-king) – Brad Bruce Aug 1 '15 at 13:41
229

The supported way is to use the JsonProperty attribute on the class properties that you want to set the order for. Read the JsonPropertyAttribute order documentation for more information.

Pass the JsonProperty an Order value and the serializer will take care of the rest.

 [JsonProperty(Order = 1)]

This is very similar to the

 DataMember(Order = 1) 

of the System.Runtime.Serialization days.

Here is an important note from @kevin-babcock

... setting the order to 1 will only work if you set an order greater than 1 on all other properties. By default any property without an Order setting will be given an order of -1. So you must either give all serialized properties and order, or set your first item to -2

  • 91
    Using the Order property of the JsonPropertyAttribute can be used to control the order in which fields are serialized/deserialized. However, setting the order to 1 will only work if you set an order greater than 1 on all other properties. By default any property without an Order setting will be given an order of -1. So you must either give all serialized properties and order, or set your first item to -2. – Kevin Babcock Feb 25 '14 at 11:23
  • This solution worked perfectly for me. ^5 – Michael Draper Jul 16 '15 at 21:58
  • 1
    It works for serialization, but the order is not being considered on deserialization. According to the documentation, the order attribute is used for both serialization and deserialization. Is there a workaround? – cangosta Dec 21 '15 at 18:46
  • Is there a similar property for the JavaScriptSerializer. – Shimmy Dec 31 '15 at 5:55
  • 2
    @cangosta The order for deserialization should not matter .. except in some very "odd" expectation cases. – user2864740 Dec 5 '16 at 6:08
120

You can actually control the order by implementing IContractResolver or overriding the DefaultContractResolver's CreateProperties method.

Here's an example of my simple implementation of IContractResolver which orders the properties alphabetically:

public class OrderedContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override System.Collections.Generic.IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(System.Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        return base.CreateProperties(type, memberSerialization).OrderBy(p => p.PropertyName).ToList();
    }
}

And then set the settings and serialize the object, and the JSON fields will be in alphabetical order:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
{
    ContractResolver = new OrderedContractResolver()
};

var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj, Formatting.Indented, settings);
  • 2
    worked perfectly for me – Michael Bahig Nov 14 '12 at 14:54
  • thanks! i was looking for that! – esskar Mar 16 '13 at 18:15
  • 8
    This is quite helpful (+1) but one caveat: it appears serialization of dictionaries doesn't use this CreateProperties customization. They serialize fine but don't end up sorted. I assume there's a different way to customize serialization of dictionaries, but I haven't found it. – solublefish Mar 6 '15 at 19:46
  • Perfect. Does just what I wanted. Thanks. – Wade Hatler Jun 7 '16 at 3:34
  • This is a great solution. Worked perfectly for me especially when putting 2 JSON objects side-by-side and having the properties line up. – Vince Apr 13 '17 at 19:29
15

In my case Mattias' answer didn't work. The CreateProperties method was never called.

After some debugging of Newtonsoft.Json internals, I came up with another solution.

public class JsonUtility
{
    public static string NormalizeJsonString(string json)
    {
        // Parse json string into JObject.
        var parsedObject = JObject.Parse(json);

        // Sort properties of JObject.
        var normalizedObject = SortPropertiesAlphabetically(parsedObject);

        // Serialize JObject .
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(normalizedObject);
    }

    private static JObject SortPropertiesAlphabetically(JObject original)
    {
        var result = new JObject();

        foreach (var property in original.Properties().ToList().OrderBy(p => p.Name))
        {
            var value = property.Value as JObject;

            if (value != null)
            {
                value = SortPropertiesAlphabetically(value);
                result.Add(property.Name, value);
            }
            else
            {
                result.Add(property.Name, property.Value);
            }
        }

        return result;
    }
}
  • 2
    This was the required fix for us when using dicts. – noocyte Jun 3 '15 at 8:39
  • This adds overhead of additional deserialization and serialization. I've added a solution which'll work for normal classes, dictionaries and ExpandoObject (dynamic object) as well – Jay Shah Mar 13 at 18:00
9

In my case niaher's solution did not work because it didn't handle objects in arrays.

Based on his solution this is what I came up with

public static class JsonUtility
{
    public static string NormalizeJsonString(string json)
    {
        JToken parsed = JToken.Parse(json);

        JToken normalized = NormalizeToken(parsed);

        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(normalized);
    }

    private static JToken NormalizeToken(JToken token)
    {
        JObject o;
        JArray array;
        if ((o = token as JObject) != null)
        {
            List<JProperty> orderedProperties = new List<JProperty>(o.Properties());
            orderedProperties.Sort(delegate(JProperty x, JProperty y) { return x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name); });
            JObject normalized = new JObject();
            foreach (JProperty property in orderedProperties)
            {
                normalized.Add(property.Name, NormalizeToken(property.Value));
            }
            return normalized;
        }
        else if ((array = token as JArray) != null)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < array.Count; i++)
            {
                array[i] = NormalizeToken(array[i]);
            }
            return array;
        }
        else
        {
            return token;
        }
    }
}
  • This adds overhead of additional deserialization and serialization. – Jay Shah Mar 13 at 17:59
  • Excellent solution. Thank you. – MaYaN May 31 at 11:03
3

As Charlie noted, you can somewhat control the ordering of the JSON properties by ordering the properties in the class itself. Unfortunately, this approach doesn't work for properties inherited from a base class. The base class properties will be ordered as they are laid out in code, but will appear before the base class properties.

And for anyone wondering why you might want to alphabetize JSON properties, it's a whole lot easier to work with raw JSON files, particularly for classes with lots of properties, if they are ordered.

3

This will work for normal classes, dictionaries and ExpandoObject (dynamic object) as well.

class OrderedPropertiesContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
    {
        protected override IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(System.Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
        {
            var props = base.CreateProperties(type, memberSerialization);
            return props.OrderBy(p => p.PropertyName).ToList();
        }
    }



class OrderedExpandoPropertiesConverter : ExpandoObjectConverter
    {
        public override bool CanWrite
        {
            get { return true; }
        }

        public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
        {
            var expando = (IDictionary<string, object>)value;
            var orderedDictionary = expando.OrderBy(x => x.Key).ToDictionary(t => t.Key, t => t.Value);
            serializer.Serialize(writer, orderedDictionary);
        }
    }



var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            ContractResolver = new OrderedPropertiesContractResolver(),
            Converters = { new OrderedExpandoPropertiesConverter() }
        };

var serializedString = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj, settings);
  • Wasn't this the default ordering behavior during serialization? – mr5 Sep 26 at 2:48
0

The following recursive method uses reflection to sort the internal token list on an existing JObject instance rather than creating a brand new sorted object graph. This code relies on internal Json.NET implementation details and should not be used in production.

void SortProperties(JToken token)
{
    var obj = token as JObject;
    if (obj != null)
    {
        var props = typeof (JObject)
            .GetField("_properties",
                      BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
            .GetValue(obj);
        var items = typeof (Collection<JToken>)
            .GetField("items", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
            .GetValue(props);
        ArrayList.Adapter((IList) items)
            .Sort(new ComparisonComparer(
                (x, y) =>
                {
                    var xProp = x as JProperty;
                    var yProp = y as JProperty;
                    return xProp != null && yProp != null
                        ? string.Compare(xProp.Name, yProp.Name)
                        : 0;
                }));
    }
    foreach (var child in token.Children())
    {
        SortProperties(child);
    }
}
0

Actually, since my Object was already a JObject, I used the following solution:

public class SortedJObject : JObject
{
    public SortedJObject(JObject other)
    {
        var pairs = new List<KeyValuePair<string, JToken>>();
        foreach (var pair in other)
        {
            pairs.Add(pair);
        }
        pairs.OrderBy(p => p.Key).ForEach(pair => this[pair.Key] = pair.Value);
    }
}

and then use it like this:

string serializedObj = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(new SortedJObject(dataObject));
0

If you control (i.e. write) the class, put the properties in alphabetical order and they will serialize in alphabetical order when JsonConvert.SerializeObject() is called.

0

I want to serialize an comblex object and keep the order of the properties as they where defined in code. I can't just add [JsonProperty(Order = 1)] because the class itself is out of my scope.

This solution also takes into account that properties which are defined in a base class should have a higher priority.

This may not be bulletproof, since nowhere is defined that the MetaDataAttribute ensures the correct order, but it seems to work. For my use case this is ok. since I only want to maintain human readability for an auto generated config file.

public class PersonWithAge : Person
{
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public string GetJson()
{
    var thequeen = new PersonWithAge { Name = "Elisabeth", Age = Int32.MaxValue };

    var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
    {
        ContractResolver = new MetadataTokenContractResolver(),
    };

    return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
        thequeen, Newtonsoft.Json.Formatting.Indented, settings
    );

}

public class MetadataTokenContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(
        Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        var props = type
           .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance
               | BindingFlags.Public
               | BindingFlags.NonPublic
           ).ToDictionary(k => k.Name, v =>
           {
               // first value: declaring type
               var classIndex = 0;
               var t = type;
               while (t != v.DeclaringType)
               {
                   classIndex++;
                   t = type.BaseType;
               }
               return Tuple.Create(classIndex, v.MetadataToken);
           });

        return base.CreateProperties(type, memberSerialization)
            .OrderByDescending(p => props[p.PropertyName].Item1)
            .ThenBy(p => props[p.PropertyName].Item1)
            .ToList();
    }
}

-1

If you want to globally configure your API with ordered fields, please combine Mattias Nordberg answer:

public class OrderedContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override System.Collections.Generic.IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(System.Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        return base.CreateProperties(type, memberSerialization).OrderBy(p => p.PropertyName).ToList();
    }
}

with my answer here:

How to force ASP.NET Web API to always return JSON?

-6

There's no order of fields in the JSON format so defining an order doesn't make sense.

{ id: 1, name: 'John' } is equivalent to { name: 'John', id: 1 } (both represent a strictly equivalent object instance)

  • 10
    @Darin - but there is an order in the serialization. "{ id: 1, name: 'John' }" and "{ name: 'John', id: 1 }" are different as strings, which is what I care about here. Of course, the objects are equivalent when deserialized. – Kevin Montrose Jul 25 '10 at 21:09
  • 1
    @Darin - no, not in this case. I'm serializing something and then passing it along as a string to a service that only deals in strings (not JSON aware), and it'd be convenient for a variety of reasons for one field to appear first in the string. – Kevin Montrose Jul 25 '10 at 21:27
  • 1
    its good for testing also, being able to just look at the strings rather than having to deserialize. – Steve Dec 26 '12 at 2:21
  • 7
    A stable serialization order is handy for cache validation too. It's trivial to take a checksum of a string - not true of a full object graph. – solublefish Mar 6 '15 at 19:25
  • 1
    Serialization order is also handy when doing unit tests so that you can easily say that expected vs actual response strings are equal even when the order of the json properties are different. – anon Apr 11 '17 at 15:55

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