60

So I've followed this tutorial but it doesn't seem to do anything. Simply nothing. It waits a few seconds and closes the program. What is wrong with this code?

import cv2
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture('Compton.mp4')
success,image = vidcap.read()
count = 0
success = True
while success:
  success,image = vidcap.read()
  cv2.imwrite("frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file
  if cv2.waitKey(10) == 27:                     # exit if Escape is hit
      break
  count += 1

Also, in the comments it says that this limits the frames to 1000? Why?

EDIT: I tried doing success = True first but that didn't help. It only created one image that was 0 bytes.

  • 1
    What's the value of success? – 101 Oct 23 '15 at 20:49
  • 1
    What is the value? The type may be boolean, but is it True or False? – That1Guy Oct 23 '15 at 20:50
  • 1
    Yes, but what is your value? It might be false in which case your program would simply "wait a few seconds and close". In other words, add a print success somewhere. – 101 Oct 23 '15 at 20:51
  • 1
    It doesn't make sense to force success; if it's false then that means the video read has failed for some reason. You need get that bit working first. – 101 Oct 23 '15 at 20:59
  • 1
    Your readh is failing. Have you built opencv with python and ffmpeg as instructed in the tutorial? brew install opencv --python27 --ffmpeg if you are using a different version of Python you will need to change it to your version. – Knells Oct 28 '15 at 2:01

10 Answers 10

108
+50

From here download this video so we have the same video file for the test. Make sure to have that mp4 file in the same directory of your python code. Then also make sure to run the python interpreter from the same directory.

Then modify the code, ditch waitKey that's wasting time also without a window it cannot capture the keyboard events. Also we print the success value to make sure it's reading the frames successfully.

import cv2
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture('big_buck_bunny_720p_5mb.mp4')
success,image = vidcap.read()
count = 0
while success:
  cv2.imwrite("frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file      
  success,image = vidcap.read()
  print('Read a new frame: ', success)
  count += 1

How does that go?

  • 4
    This saves an empty jpeg file, and it returns Read a new frame: False – GShocked Oct 28 '15 at 23:06
  • 2
    That means opencv can not read the video. Most likely it cannot access ffmpeg. what OS are you using? – fireant Oct 28 '15 at 23:10
  • 1
    Look at this: kronoskoders.logdown.com/posts/… – fireant Oct 28 '15 at 23:14
  • 2
    Google the instructions for your specific version of opencv and follow precisely on how to get ffmpeg and opencv-python working on Windows. – fireant Oct 28 '15 at 23:40
  • 2
    So I used this question to solve my problem with the compatibility. I had to rename the DLL to opencv_ffmpeg300.dll (as the Python-installation of OpenCV2 was 3.0.0). I placed it into my Python directory (C:\Python27). I didn't need to install the windows version of ffmpeg nor opencv, but I did need that DLL that comes with OpenCV, but I deleted the rest of OpenCV after that. Anyhow, I will select this as an answer, but anyone reading this must know about this ESSENTIAL DLL. – GShocked Oct 29 '15 at 0:33
27

So here was the final code that worked:

import cv2
print(cv2.__version__)
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture('big_buck_bunny_720p_5mb.mp4')
success,image = vidcap.read()
count = 0
success = True
while success:
  cv2.imwrite("frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file
  success,image = vidcap.read()
  print 'Read a new frame: ', success
  count += 1

So for this to work, you'll have to get some stuff. First, download OpenCV2. Then install this for Python 2.7.x. Go to the ffmpeg folder inside the 3rd party folder (something like C:\OpenCV\3rdparty\ffmpeg, but i'm not sure). Copy opencv_ffmpeg.dll (or the x64 version if your python version is x64) and paste it into your Python folder (probably C:\Python27). Rename it opencv_ffmpeg300.dll if your opencv version is 3.0.0 (you can find it here), and change accordingly to your version. Btw, you must have your python folder in your environment path.

  • Its not working for python 3. How can I use this with python 3? – Anmol Monga Feb 13 '17 at 9:32
  • 1
    I am not accustomed to Python 3 syntax; You would need to change the code to Python 3 syntax. This is assuming OpenCV2 and ffmpeg would be compatible with Python 3 in this use case. – GShocked Feb 14 '17 at 21:27
  • 1
    You may need to check the success variable returned from vidcap.read() method. Otherwise, it will throw an error when reach to the end of the video file. – Mingjiang Shi Jan 23 '18 at 6:09
17

To extend on this question (& answer by @user2700065) for slightly different case, if anyone does not want to extract every frame but wants to extract frame every one second. So 1 minute video will give 60 frames(images).

import sys
import argparse

import cv2
print(cv2.__version__)

def extractImages(pathIn, pathOut):
    count = 0
    vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(pathIn)
    success,image = vidcap.read()
    success = True
    while success:
      vidcap.set(cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_MSEC,(count*1000))    # added this line 
      success,image = vidcap.read()
      print ('Read a new frame: ', success)
      cv2.imwrite( pathOut + "\\frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file
      count = count + 1

if __name__=="__main__":
    print("aba")
    a = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    a.add_argument("--pathIn", help="path to video")
    a.add_argument("--pathOut", help="path to images")
    args = a.parse_args()
    print(args)
    extractImages(args.pathIn, args.pathOut)
  • I am using opencv-2.4.9, so instead of cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_MSEC I had to use cv2.cv.CAP_PROP_POS_MSEC – Pratik Kumar Mar 20 '18 at 8:32
  • How to change the code if I want frames every say 5 seconds ? – Soumya Boral Jul 19 '18 at 18:57
  • @SoumyaBoral count = count + 5 – Bhushan Babar Oct 26 '18 at 10:13
6

After a lot of research on how to convert frames to video I have created this function hope this helps. We require opencv for this:

import cv2
import numpy as np
import os

def frames_to_video(inputpath,outputpath,fps):
   image_array = []
   files = [f for f in os.listdir(inputpath) if isfile(join(inputpath, f))]
   files.sort(key = lambda x: int(x[5:-4]))
   for i in range(len(files)):
       img = cv2.imread(inputpath + files[i])
       size =  (img.shape[1],img.shape[0])
       img = cv2.resize(img,size)
       image_array.append(img)
   fourcc = cv2.VideoWriter_fourcc('D', 'I', 'V', 'X')
   out = cv2.VideoWriter(outputpath,fourcc, fps, size)
   for i in range(len(image_array)):
       out.write(image_array[i])
   out.release()


inputpath = 'folder path'
outpath =  'video file path/video.mp4'
fps = 29
frames_to_video(inputpath,outpath,fps)

change the value of fps(frames per second),input folder path and output folder path according to your own local locations

  • files.sort(key = lambda x: int(x[5:-4])) ADDING THE ABOVE LINE which helps to sort the frames according to the number and not the string eg: initially frame1.jpg was followed by frame10.jpg not frame2.jpg ,the line above sorts the files according to the numbers in it . – Puja Sharma May 5 '17 at 5:12
  • Question was from video to frame – Santhosh Dhaipule Chandrakanth Nov 30 '18 at 5:35
6

This is a tweak from previous answer for python 3.x from @GShocked, I would post it to the comment, but dont have enough reputation

import sys
import argparse

import cv2
print(cv2.__version__)

def extractImages(pathIn, pathOut):
    vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(pathIn)
    success,image = vidcap.read()
    count = 0
    success = True
    while success:
      success,image = vidcap.read()
      print ('Read a new frame: ', success)
      cv2.imwrite( pathOut + "\\frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file
      count += 1

if __name__=="__main__":
    print("aba")
    a = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    a.add_argument("--pathIn", help="path to video")
    a.add_argument("--pathOut", help="path to images")
    args = a.parse_args()
    print(args)
    extractImages(args.pathIn, args.pathOut)
4

The previous answers have lost the first frame. And it will be nice to store the images in a folder.

# create a folder to store extracted images
import os
folder = 'test'  
os.mkdir(folder)
# use opencv to do the job
import cv2
print(cv2.__version__)  # my version is 3.1.0
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture('test_video.mp4')
count = 0
while True:
    success,image = vidcap.read()
    if not success:
        break
    cv2.imwrite(os.path.join(folder,"frame{:d}.jpg".format(count)), image)     # save frame as JPEG file
    count += 1
print("{} images are extacted in {}.".format(count,folder))

By the way, you can check the frame rate by VLC. Go to windows -> media information -> codec details

  • Is there a way to increase frame rate while extraction? – Pratik Khadloya Aug 19 '18 at 0:41
  • No. When a video is made, the frame rate is fixed. You can't extract more than that. – Yuchao Jiang Aug 20 '18 at 21:43
4

This code extract frames from the video and save the frames in .jpg formate

import cv2
import numpy as np
import os

# set video file path of input video with name and extension
vid = cv2.VideoCapture('VideoPath')


if not os.path.exists('images'):
    os.makedirs('images')

#for frame identity
index = 0
while(True):
    # Extract images
    ret, frame = vid.read()
    # end of frames
    if not ret: 
        break
    # Saves images
    name = './images/frame' + str(index) + '.jpg'
    print ('Creating...' + name)
    cv2.imwrite(name, frame)

    # next frame
    index += 1
  • 1
    this doesn't work with ".mov" format video files – anu Sep 28 '18 at 3:06
4

This is Function which will convert most of the video formats to number of frames there are in the video. It works on Python3 with OpenCV 3+

import cv2
import time
import os

def video_to_frames(input_loc, output_loc):
    """Function to extract frames from input video file
    and save them as separate frames in an output directory.
    Args:
        input_loc: Input video file.
        output_loc: Output directory to save the frames.
    Returns:
        None
    """
    try:
        os.mkdir(output_loc)
    except OSError:
        pass
    # Log the time
    time_start = time.time()
    # Start capturing the feed
    cap = cv2.VideoCapture(input_loc)
    # Find the number of frames
    video_length = int(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT)) - 1
    print ("Number of frames: ", video_length)
    count = 0
    print ("Converting video..\n")
    # Start converting the video
    while cap.isOpened():
        # Extract the frame
        ret, frame = cap.read()
        # Write the results back to output location.
        cv2.imwrite(output_loc + "/%#05d.jpg" % (count+1), frame)
        count = count + 1
        # If there are no more frames left
        if (count > (video_length-1)):
            # Log the time again
            time_end = time.time()
            # Release the feed
            cap.release()
            # Print stats
            print ("Done extracting frames.\n%d frames extracted" % count)
            print ("It took %d seconds forconversion." % (time_end-time_start))
            break

if __name__=="__main__":

    input_loc = '/path/to/video/00009.MTS'
    output_loc = '/path/to/output/frames/'
    video_to_frames(input_loc, output_loc)

It supports .mts and normal files like .mp4 and .avi. Tried and Tested on .mts files. Works like a Charm.

2

I am using Python via Anaconda's Spyder software. Using the original code listed in the question of this thread by @Gshocked, the code does not work (the python won't read the mp4 file). So I downloaded OpenCV 3.2 and copied "opencv_ffmpeg320.dll" and "opencv_ffmpeg320_64.dll" from the "bin" folder. I pasted both of these dll files to Anaconda's "Dlls" folder.

Anaconda also has a "pckgs" folder...I copied and pasted the entire "OpenCV 3.2" folder that I downloaded to the Anaconda "pckgs" folder.

Finally, Anaconda has a "Library" folder which has a "bin" subfolder. I pasted the "opencv_ffmpeg320.dll" and "opencv_ffmpeg320_64.dll" files to that folder.

After closing and restarting Spyder, the code worked. I'm not sure which of the three methods worked, and I'm too lazy to go back and figure it out. But it works so, cheers!

2

This function extracts images from video with 1 fps, IN ADDITION it identifies the last frame and stops reading also:

import cv2
import numpy as np

def extract_image_one_fps(video_source_path):

    vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(video_source_path)
    count = 0
    success = True
    while success:
      vidcap.set(cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_MSEC,(count*1000))      
      success,image = vidcap.read()

      ## Stop when last frame is identified
      image_last = cv2.imread("frame{}.png".format(count-1))
      if np.array_equal(image,image_last):
          break

      cv2.imwrite("frame%d.png" % count, image)     # save frame as PNG file
      print '{}.sec reading a new frame: {} '.format(count,success)
      count += 1

protected by eyllanesc Jul 30 '18 at 11:08

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