1

I keep getting the following syntax error " syntax error near unexpected token `case'" in vi when trying to run the following:

 #!/bin/bash
if [ -z $1 ]
then
        NAME="Person"
elif [ -n $1 ]
then
        NAME=$1
fi

for NAME
case $NAME in
        "Alice") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Bob") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Charlie") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Quan") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Brandon") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        *) echo "Sorry, That $NAME is not a member of the name group.";;
esac
  • That worked thank you – Hector Gaston Oct 24 '15 at 2:06
  • 1
    Whenever you're faced with shell syntax errors, paste your code at shellcheck.net. – mklement0 Oct 24 '15 at 2:44
1

just syntax error, try this

#!/bin/bash
if [ -z $1 ]
then
        NAME="Person"
elif [ -n $1 ]
then
        NAME=$1
fi

case $NAME in
        "Alice") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Bob") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Charlie") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Quan") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        "Brandon") echo "$NAME is a member of the name group.";;
        *) echo "Sorry, That $NAME is not a member of the name group.";;
esac
1
#!/bin/bash
#Will also work with dash (/bin/sh)

#Shorter default-value assignment
#+ no need for an all-cap variable
name="$1" 
: "${name:=Person}"

#`for name` doesn't belong here
case "$name" in
        "Alice") echo "$name is a member of the name group.";;
        "Bob") echo "$name is a member of the name group.";;
        "Charlie") echo "$name is a member of the name group.";;
        "Quan") echo "$name is a member of the name group.";;
        "Brandon") echo "$name is a member of the name group.";;
        *) echo "Sorry, That $name is not a member of the name group.";;
esac

All-cap variables are generally used for:

  • variables exported to or inherited from the environment
  • variables that configure the shell

No need to go all caps if neither applies.

It's a good practice to quote "$variables" by default, unless you specifically want splitting on whitespace (or more accurately $IFS).

0

The for loop condition is incomplete.

See this as an example:

The for loop is a little bit different from other programming languages. Basically, it let's you iterate over a series of 'words' within a string.

An example:

for i in $( ls ); do
    echo item: $i
done

You will need an iteration over NAME in your script.


EDIT Actually, as a comment pointed out, you do not even need the for loop in your code at all. You can take it out. But if you need to write a proper for, take this into consideration.

  • 1
    thank you for this. I am just learning these linux commands. I fixed the problem. by removing the for loop – Hector Gaston Oct 24 '15 at 2:07
  • @HectorGaston glad it helped (don't forget to accept if it did)! And welcome to the StackOverflow community! – Jonathan Lam Oct 24 '15 at 2:08
  • 1
    Parsing the output of ls is generally a bad idea. $( ls ) will break on filenames with whitespace characters in them. for i in *; do won't. – PSkocik Oct 24 '15 at 2:12
  • @PSkocik That wasn't my code; it was from the link. But it's a good point. – Jonathan Lam Oct 24 '15 at 2:13
  • 1
    As you can glean from @PSkocik's comments: the page you link to promotes bad habits (and grammar); I suggest you neither link to it nor quote from it. In the future, consider linking to mywiki.wooledge.org instead - such as to why you shouldn't use for to parse command output. – mklement0 Oct 24 '15 at 2:41

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.