19

I fitted a mutinomial model using nnet's multinom function using (in this case on data giving the diet preference of male and female and different size classes of alligators in different lakes) :

data=read.csv("https://www.dropbox.com/s/y9elunsbv74p2h6/alligator.csv?dl=1")
head(data)
  id size  sex    lake food
1  1 <2.3 male hancock fish
2  2 <2.3 male hancock fish
3  3 <2.3 male hancock fish
4  4 <2.3 male hancock fish
5  5 <2.3 male hancock fish
6  6 <2.3 male hancock fish

library(nnet)
fit=multinom(food~lake+sex+size, data = data, Hess = TRUE)

The overall significance of my factors I can get using

library(car)
Anova(fit, type="III")  # type III tests
Analysis of Deviance Table (Type III tests)

Response: food
     LR Chisq Df Pr(>Chisq)    
lake   50.318 12  1.228e-06 ***
sex     2.215  4   0.696321    
size   17.600  4   0.001477 ** 

And effect plots I got e.g. for factor "lake" using

library(effects)
plot(effect(fit,term="lake"),ylab="Food",type="probability",style="stacked",colors=rainbow(5))

enter image description here

In addition to the overall Anova tests I would also like to also carry out pairwise Tukey posthoc tests though to test for overall differences in the multinomial distribution of which prey items are eaten, e.g. across different pairs of lakes.

I first thought of using function glht in package multcomp but this does not appear to work, e.g. for factor lake:

library(multcomp)
summary(glht(fit, mcp(lake = "Tukey")))
Error in summary(glht(fit, mcp(lake = "Tukey"))) : 
  error in evaluating the argument 'object' in selecting a method for function 'summary': Error in glht.matrix(model = list(n = c(6, 0, 5), nunits = 12L, nconn = c(0,  : 
  ‘ncol(linfct)’ is not equal to ‘length(coef(model))’

Alternative was to use package lsmeans for this, for which I tried

lsmeans(fit, pairwise ~ lake | food, adjust="tukey", mode = "prob")
$contrasts
food = bird:
 contrast               estimate         SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock    -0.04397388 0.05451515 24  -0.807  0.8507
 george - oklawaha    0.03680712 0.03849268 24   0.956  0.7751
 george - trafford   -0.02123255 0.05159049 24  -0.412  0.9760
 hancock - oklawaha   0.08078100 0.04983303 24   1.621  0.3863
 hancock - trafford   0.02274133 0.06242724 24   0.364  0.9831
 oklawaha - trafford -0.05803967 0.04503128 24  -1.289  0.5786

food = fish:
 contrast               estimate         SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock    -0.02311955 0.09310322 24  -0.248  0.9945
 george - oklawaha    0.19874095 0.09273047 24   2.143  0.1683
 george - trafford    0.32066789 0.08342262 24   3.844  0.0041
 hancock - oklawaha   0.22186050 0.09879102 24   2.246  0.1396
 hancock - trafford   0.34378744 0.09088119 24   3.783  0.0047
 oklawaha - trafford  0.12192695 0.08577365 24   1.421  0.4987

food = invert:
 contrast               estimate         SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock     0.23202865 0.06111726 24   3.796  0.0046
 george - oklawaha   -0.13967425 0.08808698 24  -1.586  0.4053
 george - trafford   -0.07193252 0.08346283 24  -0.862  0.8242
 hancock - oklawaha  -0.37170290 0.07492749 24  -4.961  0.0003
 hancock - trafford  -0.30396117 0.07129577 24  -4.263  0.0014
 oklawaha - trafford  0.06774173 0.09384594 24   0.722  0.8874

food = other:
 contrast               estimate         SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock    -0.12522495 0.06811177 24  -1.839  0.2806
 george - oklawaha    0.03499241 0.05141930 24   0.681  0.9035
 george - trafford   -0.08643898 0.06612383 24  -1.307  0.5674
 hancock - oklawaha   0.16021736 0.06759887 24   2.370  0.1103
 hancock - trafford   0.03878598 0.08135810 24   0.477  0.9635
 oklawaha - trafford -0.12143138 0.06402725 24  -1.897  0.2560

food = rep:
 contrast               estimate         SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock    -0.03971026 0.03810819 24  -1.042  0.7269
 george - oklawaha   -0.13086622 0.05735022 24  -2.282  0.1305
 george - trafford   -0.14106384 0.06037257 24  -2.337  0.1177
 hancock - oklawaha  -0.09115595 0.06462624 24  -1.411  0.5052
 hancock - trafford  -0.10135358 0.06752424 24  -1.501  0.4525
 oklawaha - trafford -0.01019762 0.07161794 24  -0.142  0.9989

Results are averaged over the levels of: sex, size 
P value adjustment: tukey method for comparing a family of 4 estimates 

This carries out tests for differences in the proportion of each specific type of food item though.

I was wondering if it would also be possible in one way or another to obtain Tukey posthoc tests in which the overall multinomial distributions are compared across the different lakes, i.e. where differences are tested for in the proportion of any of the prey items eaten? I tried with

lsmeans(fit, pairwise ~ lake, adjust="tukey", mode = "prob")

but that doesn't seem to work:

$contrasts
 contrast                 estimate           SE df t.ratio p.value
 george - hancock     3.252607e-19 1.879395e-10 24       0  1.0000
 george - oklawaha   -8.131516e-19 1.861245e-10 24       0  1.0000
 george - trafford   -1.843144e-18 2.504062e-10 24       0  1.0000
 hancock - oklawaha  -1.138412e-18          NaN 24     NaN     NaN
 hancock - trafford  -2.168404e-18          NaN 24     NaN     NaN
 oklawaha - trafford -1.029992e-18          NaN 24     NaN     NaN

Any thoughts?

Or would anyone know how glht could be made to work for multinom models?

3
  • 1
    Besides the fact you apparently asked the same question twice, there seems to be too much information on these questions. Can't you narrow down to the specific problem instead of posting everything you've done so far?
    – Molx
    Commented Oct 24, 2015 at 12:11
  • I didn't ask the same question twice - this question is about a multinomial model fit using nnet's multinom and the other question about a proportional odds cumulative logit model fit using MASS's polr - these are two completely different things! I've shortened my question a bit though.... (Just thought that the other info might have been useful to diagnose the problem with lsmeans) Commented Oct 24, 2015 at 15:24
  • Regarding the last part, I already tried to explain to you in earlier a personal communication that lsmeans of just lake involve averaging over food, which is your multinomial response. Those multinomial probabilities necessarily sum to 1 over food for any fixed setting of the other factors, so when you average over food you always will get $0.2$. So the flaky-looking comparisons are all just of rounding error. That is no way to compare the lakes. If you want pairwise comparisons, then formulate some kind of linear combination of the probabilities for each lake and compare those scores.
    – Russ Lenth
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 2:49

1 Answer 1

5

Just received a kind message of Russ Lenth, and he thought the syntax to do these pairwise comparisons among lakes to test for differences in the multinomial distribution of what food items the alligators eat would be

lsm = lsmeans(fit, ~ lake|food, mode = "latent")
cmp = contrast(lsm, method="pairwise", ref=1) 
test = test(cmp, joint=TRUE, by="contrast") 
There are linearly dependent rows - df are reduced accordingly
test
 contrast            df1 df2     F p.value
 george - hancock      4  24 3.430  0.0236
 george - oklawaha     4  24 2.128  0.1084
 george - trafford     4  24 3.319  0.0268
 hancock - oklawaha    4  24 5.820  0.0020
 hancock - trafford    4  24 5.084  0.0041
 oklawaha - trafford   4  24 1.484  0.2383

Thanks Russ!

2
  • Good point - I don't think so actually... But you could still apply some correction for multiple testing using p.adjust in the multcomp package... Commented Nov 3, 2017 at 15:36
  • Trying this now, with emmeans instead of lsmeans. Have you probed an interaction in a nnet::multinom() model with emmeans before? It's throwing me some errors.
    – Mark White
    Commented Feb 23, 2018 at 15:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.