5

Suppose I have the following two Lua files:

In a.lua:

local x = 5
f = dofile'b.lua'
f()

In b.lua:

local fun = function()
  print(x)
end
return fun

Then if I run luajit a.lua in shell it prints nil since x cannot be seen in the function defined in b.lua. The expected printing should be 5. However if I put everything in a single file then it's exactly what I want:

In aa.lua:

local x = 5
local f = function()
  print(x)
end
f()

Run luajit aa.lua it prints 5.

So why x cannot be seen in the first case?

3 Answers 3

5

As their name suggests, local variables are local to the chunk.

dofile() loads the chunk from another file. Since it's another chunk, it makes sense that the local variable x in the first chunk isn't seen by it.

1
  • Thanks for your answer! Just one more thing: if the body of the function fun is too large that I don't want to put it in the file a.lua but a separate file (as what I do in the first case which doesn't work), is there any good idiom to make it work?
    – peng sun
    Oct 26, 2015 at 3:02
3

I agree that it is somewhat unintuitive that this doesn't work.

You'd like to say, at any point in the code there is a clear set of variables that are 'visible' -- some may be local, some may be global, but there is some map that the interpreter can use to resolve names of either kind.

When you load a chunk using dofile, then it can see whatever global variables currently exist, but apparently it can't see any local variables. We know that 'dofile' is not like C/C++ inclusion macros, which would give exactly the behavior you describe for local variables, but still you might reasonably expect that this part of it would work the same.

Ultimately there's no answer but "that's just not how they specified the language". The only satisfying answer is probably along the lines 'because otherwise it would cause non-obvious problem X' or 'because then use-case Y would go slower'.

I think the best answer is that, if all names were dynamically rebound according to the scope in which they are loaded when you use loadfile / dofile, that would inhibit a lot of optimization and such when compiling chunks into bytecode. In the lua system, name resolution works like 'either it is local in this scope, and then it binds to that (known) object, or, it is a lookup in the (unique) global table.' This system is pretty simple, there are only a few options and not a lot of room for complexity.

I don't think that running byte code even keeps track of the names of local variables, it discards them after the chunk is compiled. They would have to undo that optimization if they wanted to allow dynamic name resolution at chunk loading time like you suggest.


If your question is not really why but how can I make it work anyways, then one way you can do it is, in the host script, put any local variables that you want to be visible in the environment of the script that is called. When you do this you need to split dofile into a few calls. It's slightly different in lua 5.1 vs lua 5.2.

In lua 5.1:
In a.lua:

local shared = { x = 5 }
temp = loadfile('b.lua')
setfenv(temp, shared)
f = temp()
f()

In lua 5.2:
In a.lua:

local shared = { x = 5 }
temp = loadfile('b.lua', 't', shared)
f = temp()
f()
2
  • Thanks for your lengthy and patient explanation! Just a related question that I also post below the other answer: if the body of the function fun is too large that I don't want to put it in the file a.lua but a separate file (as what I do in the first case which doesn't work), is there any good idiom to make it work?
    – peng sun
    Oct 26, 2015 at 3:05
  • @pengsun: I guess what I would suggest is to try to rewrite and refactor the whole function into many small functions. This lua style guide suggests to avoid large functions, and there's also a blog post about it. github.com/Olivine-Labs/lua-style-guide#functions I don't think lua has very good support for making an "inclusion macro" like you are sort of suggesting.
    – Chris Beck
    Oct 26, 2015 at 3:07
1

The x variable defined in module a.lua cannot be seen from b.lua because it was declared as local. The scope of a local variable is its own module.

If you want x to be visible from b.lua, just need to declare it global. A variable is either local or global. To declare a variable as global, just simply do not declare it as local.

a.lua

x = 5
f = dofile'b.lua'
f()

b.lua

local fun = function()
  print(x)
end
return fun

This will work.

Global variables live within the global namespace, which can be accessed at any given time via the _G table. When Lua cannot solve a variable, because it's not defined inside the module where is being used, Lua searches that variable in the global namespace. In conclusion, it's also possible to write b.lua as:

local fun = function()
  print(_G["x"])
end
return fun

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