317

It seems that PHP's === operator is case sensitive? So is there any reason to use strcmp()? Is it safe to do something like:

if ( $password === $password2 ) { ... }
  • 9
    What's case-sensitivity have to do with strcmp? – kennytm Jul 26 '10 at 8:50
  • 1
    @KennyTM: strcmp is case-sensitive. In some languages, like VB, string comparison may not be, and thus would return a different result. This isn't the case in PHP, though. – cHao Jul 26 '10 at 8:56
  • 11
    @jie: You may want to use === instead of == because '0XAB' == '0xab' is true. – kennytm Jul 26 '10 at 9:01
  • 15
    to use === instead of == is important, because comparing any string to 0 with == will return true which is obviously false... – Karl Adler Jan 27 '13 at 8:37
  • 3
    @Kenny Also '0xAB' == '171' – Antimony Dec 1 '14 at 6:52

12 Answers 12

314

The reason to use it is because strcmp

returns < 0 if str1 is less than str2; > 0 if str1 is greater than str2, and 0 if they are equal.

=== only returns true or false, it doesn't tell you which is the "greater" string.

  • 9
    icic tho in my current case, i dont need to know which string is greater :) – Jiew Meng Jul 26 '10 at 9:11
  • 146
    strcmp with matching strings took 0.207852 seconds strcmp with non-matching strings took 0.215276 seconds === with matching strings took 0.067122 seconds === with non-matching strings took 0.057305 seconds snipplr.com/view/758 – user503853 Apr 22 '13 at 17:00
  • 3
    The other usage for strcmp it shows the sorting. To be more clear about sorting. strcmp() returns <0 if string1 sorts before string2, >0 if string2 sorts before string1 or 0 if they are the same. For example $string_first = "aabo"; $string_second = "aaao"; echo $n = strcmp($string_first,$string_second); will return greater than zero, as aaao is sorting before aabo. – HTML Man Aug 16 '13 at 18:00
  • 19
    Why does this answer get the most upvotes? I'm downvoting because although it's the answer that this question deserves but not the 'right' answer. Right answer should be 'Use ===' as a lot of people already said in other answers. – onur güngör Nov 8 '13 at 8:14
  • 2
    @onur güngör Actually, this does answers the op's question, which is So is there any reason to use strcmp() ?, while Postfuturist's answer doesn't. Oh, hell... no one answer seemed to compile at once the use of strcmp(), the performance of ===, and the bad reliability of == for string comparisons... so I added mine to the list. – Balmipour Aug 31 '17 at 17:19
212

You should never use == for string comparison. === is OK.

$something = 0;
echo ('password123' == $something) ? 'true' : 'false';

Just run the above code and you'll see why.

$something = 0;
echo ('password123' === $something) ? 'true' : 'false';

Now, that's a little better.

  • 19
    == isn't just a problem for differing types. It will sometimes give unexpected results even if both sides are a string. Try '1e3' == '1000' – Antimony Jun 21 '12 at 1:54
  • 3
    how does 0 == 'password123' ? – Andy Lobel Aug 10 '12 at 2:41
  • 23
    @AndyLobel PHP coerces 'password123' to a number using it's odd loose comparison rules since the other operand is a number, that string, like most, coerces to the number 0, and PHP returns true for the comparison. – postfuturist Aug 10 '12 at 5:15
  • 8
    A quick var_dump((int)'password123'); helped me fully understand why this happened...**embarrassed**...I really like the === operator – Carlton Nov 8 '12 at 11:49
  • 3
    this is beacuse using '==' if one of the two operands is castable to number, php casts both the operands to numbers, and more, if a not number string is casted to number, it takes value zero, resulting equals to zero, so the result of the comparison with simple '==' can something unwanted – Luca C. Aug 1 '14 at 6:29
96

Don't use == in PHP. It will not do what you expect. Even if you are comparing strings to strings, PHP will implicitly cast them to floats and do a numerical comparison if they appear numerical.

For example '1e3' == '1000' returns true. You should use === instead.

  • 15
    But you can just ===. – Roman Newaza Jan 25 '13 at 1:08
  • 11
    @Roman yes but a lot of PHP programmers don't know they have to do that. Hence the warning. – Antimony Jan 25 '13 at 4:36
  • 5
    @Antimony So why not tell them what they should do in your answer? – Tim Mar 8 '18 at 16:19
43

Well..according to this php bug report , you can even get 0wned.

<?php 
    $pass = isset($_GET['pass']) ? $_GET['pass'] : '';
    // Query /?pass[]= will authorize user
    //strcmp and strcasecmp both are prone to this hack
    if ( strcasecmp( $pass, '123456' ) == 0 ){
      echo 'You successfully logged in.';
    }
 ?>

It gives you a warning , but still bypass the comparison.
You should be doing === as @postfuturist suggested.

  • 4
    Wow +1. Quote from the link: "It is established behavior for function that receive the wrong type of argument(s) to return null". That's amazing considering the manual just says this: "Returns < 0 if str1 is less than str2; > 0 if str1 is greater than str2, and 0 if they are equal". Null is not mentioned as a possibility, yet on pages such as the substr man page it is mentioned. sigh – Gerry Jul 4 '13 at 17:32
  • But does the same happens when the form method is post ...? – 3lokh Feb 28 '14 at 18:44
  • @NikhilGeorge It does, the function in question here is strcmp. It doesn't matter which inputs are being compared against. – Ajith Oct 11 '14 at 19:52
  • While the bug report says it was fine to return null, this is incorrect. All official PHP releases from PHP 4.3 to PHP 7.3 do not return null from these functions. I suspect it may've been an alpha or beta release, and regardless of the bug being closed is invalid, it was fixed. See 3v4l.org/Zq8tM for details, which show that it does affect HHVM 3.11 - 3.19. – Timo Tijhof Jun 26 '18 at 13:46
32

Always remember, when comparing strings, you should use === operator (strict comparison) and not == operator (loose comparison).

  • 7
    Actually, I think it's safe to say that you should use === when comparing anything. – rink.attendant.6 Jun 9 '15 at 22:37
20

Using == might be dangerous.

Note, that it would cast the variable to another data type if the two differs.

Examples:

  • echo (1 == '1') ? 'true' : 'false';
  • echo (1 == true) ? 'true' : 'false';

As you can see, these two are from different types, but the result is true, which might not be what your code will expect.

Using ===, however, is recommended as test shows that it's a bit faster than strcmp() and its case-insensitive alternative strcasecmp().

Quick googling yells this speed comparison: http://snipplr.com/view/758/

  • 1
    Sometimes it casts them to a different type even if they already have the same type. – Antimony Apr 25 '13 at 5:24
  • even when comparing two strings that represented an integer like "012" == "12" php changed the type of both strings to integer 12 == 12 and then returned true. – GoTo Sep 23 '14 at 18:09
20

Summing up all answers :

  • == is a bad idea for string comparisons.
    It will give you "surprising" results in many cases. Don't trust it.

  • === is fine, and will give you the best performance.

  • strcmp() should be used if you need to determine which string is "greater", typically for sorting operations.

10

strcmp() and === are both case sensitive but === is much faster

sample code: http://snipplr.com/view/758/

6

strcmp will return different values based on the environment it is running(Linux/Windows)!

The reason is the that it has a bug as the bug report says https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=53999

Please handle with care!!Thank you.

  • It will always return 0 if the strings are equal, though. +1 for being careful about caring about any other value than 0 though. – Prof. Falken Mar 26 '13 at 10:05
4

You can use strcmp() if you wish to order/compare strings lexicographically. If you just wish to check for equality then == is just fine.

  • 1
    Like in usort. In fact, it's pretty much made for sorting. – Charles Jul 26 '10 at 8:46
  • @Charles Thanks. Wikipedia made my eyes glaze over. – cbednarski Jul 26 '10 at 8:51
  • 6
    The first part is right, but == is not fine for equality. – postfuturist Dec 13 '11 at 19:21
  • 1
    To be more clear about sorting. strcmp() returns <0 if string1 sorts before string2, >0 if string2 sorts before string1 or 0 if they are the same. For example $string_first = "aabo"; $string_second = "aaao"; echo $n = strcmp($string_first,$string_second); will return greater than zero, as aaao is sorting before aabo. – HTML Man Aug 16 '13 at 17:58
  • @postfuturist I'm sure it's a typo and they meant ===. – ash Mar 29 '16 at 16:17
3

Also The function can help in sorting. To be more clear about sorting. strcmp() returns less than 0 if string1 sorts before string2, greater than 0 if string2 sorts before string1 or 0 if they are the same. For example

$first_string = "aabo";
$second_string = "aaao";
echo $n = strcmp($first_string,$second_string);

The function will return greater than zero, as aaao is sorting before aabo.

0

PHP Instead of using alphabetical sorting, use the ASCII value of the character to make the comparison. Lowercase letters have a higher ASCII value than capitals. It's better to use the identity operator === to make this sort of comparison. strcmp() is a function to perform binary safe string comparisons. It takes two strings as arguments and returns < 0 if str1 is less than str2; > 0 if str1 is greater than str2, and 0 if they are equal. There is also a case-insensitive version named strcasecmp() that first converts strings to lowercase and then compares them.

protected by miken32 Apr 8 at 20:53

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