9

I am using CsvHelper to read/writer the data into Csv file. Now I want to parse the delimiter of the csv file. How can I get this please?

My code:

     var parser = new CsvParser(txtReader);
     delimiter = parser.Configuration.Delimiter;

I always got delimiter is "," but actually in the csv file the delimiter is "\t".

4 Answers 4

9

Since I had to deal with the possibility that, depending on the localization settings of the user, the CSV file (Saved in MS Excel) could contain a different delimiter, I ended up with the following approach :

public static string DetectDelimiter(StreamReader reader)
{
    // assume one of following delimiters
    var possibleDelimiters =  new List<string> {",",";","\t","|"};

    var headerLine = reader.ReadLine();

    // reset the reader to initial position for outside reuse
    // Eg. Csv helper won't find header line, because it has been read in the Reader
    reader.BaseStream.Position = 0;
    reader.DiscardBufferedData();

    foreach (var possibleDelimiter in possibleDelimiters)
    {
        if (headerLine.Contains(possibleDelimiter))
        {
            return possibleDelimiter;
        }
    }

    return possibleDelimiters[0];
}

I also needed to reset the reader's read position, since it was the same instance I used In the CsvReader constructor.

The usage was then as follows:

using (var textReader = new StreamReader(memoryStream))
{
    var delimiter = DetectDelimiter(textReader);

    using (var csv = new CsvReader(textReader))
    {
        csv.Configuration.Delimiter = delimiter;

        ... rest of the csv reader process

    }
}
0
4

I found this piece of code in this site

public static char Detect(TextReader reader, int rowCount, IList<char> separators)
{
    IList<int> separatorsCount = new int[separators.Count];

    int character;

    int row = 0;

    bool quoted = false;
    bool firstChar = true;

    while (row < rowCount)
    {
        character = reader.Read();

        switch (character)
        {
            case '"':
                if (quoted)
                {
                    if (reader.Peek() != '"') // Value is quoted and 
            // current character is " and next character is not ".
                        quoted = false;
                    else
                        reader.Read(); // Value is quoted and current and 
                // next characters are "" - read (skip) peeked qoute.
                }
                else
                {
                    if (firstChar)  // Set value as quoted only if this quote is the 
                // first char in the value.
                        quoted = true;
                }
                break;
            case '\n':
                if (!quoted)
                {
                    ++row;
                    firstChar = true;
                    continue;
                }
                break;
            case -1:
                row = rowCount;
                break;
            default:
                if (!quoted)
                {
                    int index = separators.IndexOf((char)character);
                    if (index != -1)
                    {
                        ++separatorsCount[index];
                        firstChar = true;
                        continue;
                    }
                }
                break;
        }

        if (firstChar)
            firstChar = false;
    }

    int maxCount = separatorsCount.Max();

    return maxCount == 0 ? '\0' : separators[separatorsCount.IndexOf(maxCount)];
}

With separators is the possible separators that you can have.

Hope that help :)

1
  • 1
    thanks for posting this and citing the reference. Yes CSV is Comma separated, but we all know that users will not always follow the rules and to validate correctly sometimes we need to write crazy stuff
    – agrath
    Commented Jul 24, 2017 at 23:16
4

There is (at least now) a DetectDelimiter value that is set to false. You can then add wish delimiters you wish to test, although the default is sensible

3

CSV is Comma Separated Values. I don't think you can reliably detect if there is a different character used a separator. If there is a header row, then you might be able to count on it.

You should know the separator that is used. You should be able to see it when opening the file. If the source of the files gives you a different separator each time and is not reliable, then I'm sorry. ;)

If you just want to parse using a different delimiter, then you can set csv.Configuration.Delimiter. http://joshclose.github.io/CsvHelper/#configuration-delimiter

12
  • 4
    @JoshClose While CSV stands for Comma Separated Values, different locales will have different separators. For example, in the Netherlands, we have a semicolon as list separator. I was wondering; why doesn't CsvHelper take the default Delimiter from the CultureInfo? This way you'd only need to override the default Delimiter if you do some custom CSV that ignores the locale.
    – Tom Lint
    Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 14:45
  • 1
    I think that would be an easy change if you want to log an issue for it. github.com/JoshClose/CsvHelper/issues
    – Josh Close
    Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 15:23
  • 1
    @JoshClose I created an issue on github
    – Tom Lint
    Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 15:46
  • 3
    Yeah, in Norway as in the Netherlands, as probably in all countries that use comma as decimal separator, the default delimiter for csv files is a semicolon. Excel, for example, will do that in a norwegian locale. So not handling that seems like the same kind of fairly typical culture blindness as not dealing with non-ascii characters.
    – Tor Haugen
    Commented Feb 8, 2018 at 9:20
  • 2
    I don't agree with this answer. Detecting a delimiter character in an unknown, user uploaded file is a valid problem.
    – Csati
    Commented Feb 28, 2020 at 9:51

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