17

Consider the following:

struct A { /* ... */ };

A foo() {
  auto p = std::make_pair(A{}, 2);
  // ... do something
  return p.first;
}

auto a = foo();

Will p.first be copied, moved or RVO-ed?

11
  • That may depend on compiler implementation, but in general I'd expect RVO. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 11:14
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ I don't think it's allowed if an expression from a return statement is anything else than a plain identifier Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 11:24
  • @PiotrSkotnicki Good point, seems I've missed that. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 11:42
  • 1
    I like guarantees, and as far as I know, in general, RVO is not guaranteed by the standard, only allowed, right? So I prefer using e.g. non-const reference args, pointer args or smart pointers to be 100% sure no unnecessary copying is done. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 11:53
  • @PiotrSkotnicki: That's not true. There are several other cases where it's allowed, most importantly unnamed objects. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 12:56

4 Answers 4

11

I've found in Visual Studio 2010 and in gcc-5.1 RVO is not applied (see for example http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/17666dd9e532da76).

The relevant section of the standard is 12.8.31.1 [class.copy]. It states that copy elision is permitted (my highlighting):

in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function parameter or a variable introduced by the exception-declaration of a handler ([except.handle])) with the same type (ignoring cv-qualification) as the function return type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the automatic object directly into the function's return value

Since p.first is not the name of an object, RVO is prohibited.

20
  • 2
    p.first is absolutely not the name of an object. :-) Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 11:48
  • 2
    @rozina: Actually it functions as a name for the referent. This is the whole purpose of references, as distinct from pointers. But I'm not sure how much of that is according to standard terminology as opposed to being English terminology derived from usage. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 12:43
  • 2
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit gcc-5.1 considers returning a reference even to a simple local object is enough to switch off RVO (coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/84e5744d0a68f6dd). Interesting!
    – atkins
    Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 12:50
  • 2
    In 8.3.2.1 [dcl.ref], there is this "Note": A reference can be thought of as a name of an object. Do we take that as "can be thought of, but in fact is not"?!
    – atkins
    Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 13:00
  • 1
    @atkins: If the C++ standard did not want us to think of references as names for objects, then it would not include this informative note. Commented Oct 26, 2015 at 13:07
10

Just to add a little more fuel, how would this function if RVO were in play? The caller has put an instance of A somewhere in memory and then calls foo to assign to it (even better, let's assume that that A was a part of a larger struct, and let's assume that it is correctly aligned such that the next member of the struct is immediately after that instance of A). Assuming RVO were in play, the first portion of p is located where the caller wanted it, but where does the int that is second get placed? It has to go right after the instance of A in order to keep the pair functioning correctly, but at the source location, there's some other member right after that instance of A.

I would expect that RVO would not be happening in this place as you are only returning a portion of a larger object. A move could happen as first would have to be left in a destructible state.

4

@atkins got here first with the answer. Just adding this little test program which you may find useful in future when tracking move/assign behaviour.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std::string_literals;

struct A {
    A()
    : history("created")
    {
    }

    A(A&& r)
    : history("move-constructed,"s + r.history)
    {
        r.history = "zombie: was "s + r.history;
    }
    A(const A& r)
    : history("copied from: " + r.history)
    {
    }
    ~A() {
        history = "destroyed,"s + history;
        std::cout << history << std::endl;
    }
    A& operator=(A&& r) {
        history = "move-assigned from " + r.history + " (was "s + history + ")"s;
        r.history = "zombie: was "s + r.history;
        return *this;
    }
    A& operator=(const A&r ) {
        history = "copied from " + r.history;
        return *this;
    }
    std::string history;
};

A foo() {
    auto p = std::make_pair(A{}, 2);
    // ... do something
    return p.first;
}



auto main() -> int
{
    auto a = foo();
    return 0;
}

example output:

destroyed,zombie: was created
destroyed,move-constructed,created
destroyed,copied from: move-constructed,created
0

Consider following code:

struct A {};
struct B {};
struct C { B c[100000]; };

A callee()
{
    struct S
    {
        A a;
        C c;
    } s;
    return s.a;
}

void caller()
{
    A a = callee();
    // here should lie free unused spacer of size B[100000]
    B b;
}

"Partial" RVO should result in excessive stack usage bloating in caller, because (I think) S can be constructed only entirely in caller stack frame.

Another issue is ~S() behaviour:

// a.hpp
struct A {};
struct B {};
struct C { A a; B b; ~C(); };
// a.cpp
#include "a.hpp"
~C() { /* ... */; }
// main.cpp
#include "a.hpp"
A callee()
{
    C c;
    return c.a;
} // How to destruct c partially, having the user defined ~C() in another TU?
// Even if destructor is inline and its body is visible,
// how to automatically change its logic properly?
// It is impossible in general case.
void caller() { A a = callee(); }
2
  • 1) "should result in excessive stack usage bloating in caller" bad argument: the optimisation will not be applied when it causes ridiculous memory overhead; -1 for this one. 2) "How to destruct c partially" There is no such thing as partial destruction. +1 for this argument.
    – curiousguy
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 14:10
  • @curiousguy I revised first argument, but the answer remains partially invalid for the history :). Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 14:46

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