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I am trying to get my head around how to handle relationships in REST.

I have read this question.

If I have Drivers and Cars in my api and a Driver can only exist if connected to a Car I would make Drivers a subresource in Cars. The relationship between a Car and a Driver contains a set of properties, say averageSpeed and timeOnTheRoad. One Car can have many Drivers, but a Driver can only have one Car.

How should I add a new driver? How should I add a relationship between a driver and a car?

If I add a resource Wunderbaums which is not a subresource to Cars, but a Car can contain Wunderbaums. How should I add a relationship between a Car and a Wunderbaum?

One way of adding a relationship between two entities is to POST to /entityA/{id}/entityB/{id} and send properties for the relationship in the body. This would work for my example with Cars and Wunderbaums since Wunderbaums is not a subresource of Cars, but it would not work in my example with Cars and Drivers since it would interfere with CRUD functionality for Drivers. The path cars/{id}/drivers{id} would be the same for creating a relationship between a Car and a Driver as for creating a Driver.

I also found this unanswered question on the subject.

Edit 1
@JB Nizet suggested that I put the relationship properties inside of the Driver, since its a one to many relationship. It would be a possible solution, but what if a Driver could have many Cars? Should we handle one to many relations different than many to many relations?

Edit 2
We could put relationship properties with the Driver in a many to many relationship scenario as well. The question then is if Driver has its own resource, is it ok that cars/2/drivers/4 returns a different set of properties than drivers/4? In the case where I get the Driver by its relation to Car I will include avrageSpeed and timeOnTheRoad in the response.

  • it would interfere with CRUD functionality for Drivers - could you clarify please? – Opal Oct 27 '15 at 6:39
  • I updated my answer. The problem is that the same path would be used for creating a relationship as for creating a Driver, which would not be possible. – David Berg Oct 27 '15 at 7:14
  • Great! Why then, don't you add a separate endpoint for managing cars (/cars/), drivers (/drivers/) and one to establish relation between each other /cars/{carID}/drivers/ or /drivers/{driverID}/cars/? – Opal Oct 27 '15 at 7:20
  • Because a Driver can only exist if connected to a Car, so I made it a subresource of Cars. This could be wrong... but the only way you should be able to get a Driver from my api is by a Car. – David Berg Oct 27 '15 at 7:26
  • And what is the problem then? You said: The path cars/{id}/drivers{id} would be the same for creating a relationship between a Car and a Driver as for creating a Driver: how is that a problem? A driver cannot exist without its car, so every time you create a driver, you MUST create the relationship between the driver and its car. – JB Nizet Oct 27 '15 at 7:30
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From a DDD perspective, I think perhaps you're asking the wrong question; the question is not 'how do Cars and Drivers relate in the database and thus how should they manifest in the API', but "what capabilities does my API expose and what behaviors does it support"?

In other words, what does the/each REST API call mean in the context of the business (or the user's mind)? If the request is "what cars have I driven?" then driver ->> car is the relationship for that API call. If the request is "assign Tim to drive the Minivan" then the relationship for that API call is Driving -> Driver,Car

Building a CRUD system out of REST can work fine, but it sounds like what you want is a step beyond that.

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