23

Just to clarify, I have this working using dynamic and MakeGenericType. But I cant help but think there is a better way to do this. What I am trying to do is create a "plug-in" loader, using Unity. I will just explain it as I post the code so you can get a sense for what I am doing.

First I'll just post the plug-in itself:

[RegisterAction("MyPlugin", typeof(bool), typeof(MyPlugin))]
public class MyPlugin: IStrategy<bool>
{
    public IStrategyResult<bool> Execute(ISerializable info = null)
    {
        bool result;
        try
        {
           // do stuff
           result = true;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            result = false;
        }

        return new StrategyResult<bool>
        {
            Value = result
        };
    }
}

Couple things to note here. First is the RegisterActionAttribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public sealed class RegisterActionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public StrategyAction StrategyAction { get; }

    public RegisterActionAttribute(string actionName, Type targetType, Type returnType, params string[] depdencies)
    {
        StrategyAction = new StrategyAction
        {
            Name = actionName,
            StrategyType = targetType,
            ResponseType = returnType,
            Dependencies = depdencies
        };
    }
}

Then the interfaces:

public interface IStrategy<T>
{
    IStrategyResult<T> Execute(ISerializable info = null);
}

public interface IStrategyResult<T>
{
    bool IsValid { get; set; }
    T Value { get; set; }
}

All fairly straight forward. The goal here is just to attach some meta-data to the class when it is loaded. The loading happens via unity using a wrapper that simply loads the assemblies in the bin directory using a file search pattern and adds it to a singleton class with a collection of StrategyActions. I don't need paste all the unity code here as I know it works and registers and resolves the assemblies.

So now to the meat of the question. I have a function on the singleton that executes actions. These are applied with Unity.Interception HandlerAttributes and passed a string like so (I can post the code for this but I didn't think it was relevant):

[ExecuteAction("MyPlugin")]

The handler calls the following execute function on the singleton class to "execute" functions that are registered (added to the collection).

public dynamic Execute(string action, params object[] parameters)
{
    var strategyAction = _registeredActions.FirstOrDefault(a => a.Name == action);
    if (strategyAction == null)
        return null;

    var type = typeof (IStrategy<>);
    var generic = type.MakeGenericType(strategyAction.StrategyType);

    var returnType = typeof (IStrategyResult<>);
    var genericReturn = returnType.MakeGenericType(strategyAction.ResponseType);

    var instance = UnityManager.Container.Resolve(generic, strategyAction.Name);
    var method = instance.GetType().GetMethod("Execute");

    return method.Invoke(instance, parameters);
}

This execute is wrapped in an enumerator call which returns a collection of results, which sorts to manage dependencies and what not (see below). These values are referenced by the caller using the Value property of ISTrategyResult{T} to do various things defined by other business rules.

public List<dynamic> ExecuteQueuedActions()
    {
        var results = new List<dynamic>();
        var actions = _queuedActions.AsQueryable();
        var sortedActions = TopologicalSort.Sort(actions, action => action.Dependencies, action => action.Name);
        foreach(var strategyAction in sortedActions)
        {
            _queuedActions.Remove(strategyAction);
            results.Add(Execute(strategyAction.Name));
        }
        return results;
    }

Now mind you, this works, and I get the return type that is specified by the plugins RegisterAction attribute. As you can see I am capturing the Type of the plugin and the return type. I am using the "generic" variable to resolve the type with unity through the use of MakeGenericType, which works fine. I am also creating a generic representing the return type based on the type from the collection.

What I don't like here is having to use dynamic to return this value to a function. I can't figure out a way to return this as a IStrategyResult{T} because obviously the caller to "dynamic Execute(..." can not, at run-time, imply return type of the function. I mulled around with making the call to Execute with a MakeGenericMethod call as I actually have the expected type the StrategyAction. It would be cool if I could some how figure out away to return a strongly typed result of IStrategyResult{T} while determining the type of T during the call.

I do understand why I cannot do this with my current implementation I am just trying to find a way to wrap all this functionality without using dynamic. And was hoping somebody could provide some advice that might be useful. If that means wrapping this with other calls to non-generic classes or something like that, that would be fine as well if that is the only solution.

5
  • 1
    What do you do with the results once you have them? It looks like you need some corresponding IHandler<T> interface for handling the results. Then you can just compose the Execute and Handle methods as Actions.
    – Lee
    Oct 26, 2015 at 17:10
  • I added a wrapper function that I can using to aggregate the results of the calls, hopefully that answers your question. Or maybe I am misunderstanding your response?
    – Brandon
    Oct 26, 2015 at 17:21
  • I think I see what you're saying, which makes sense. However, given that I need to return some of these values I think would run into the same issue of knowing the type of T in the caller. I know this is the inherent problem with doing it this way. I guess it is just the nature of the beast and the only thing I can do is add some checking/casting in the caller to appropriately deal with the results. The cool (but dangerous) thing about dynamic is that I don't need to cast to reference the result. But once its in a dynamic its sort of in a philosophically "gray" area.
    – Brandon
    Oct 26, 2015 at 17:41
  • How are you aggregating your results? are you checking the type of T in IStrategyResult<T>? if you could provide a sample it would be nice. Oct 28, 2015 at 18:28
  • Can you provide an example of what a caller of ExecuteQueuedActions is expecting to do with the results? Should T in IStrategy<T> be constrained somehow or limited to a fixed set of types? Oct 30, 2015 at 16:12

4 Answers 4

7
+75

You need a more sweeping refactor than just figure out how to call your plugin.

There's no need for the [RegisterAction] attribute to hold targetType and returnType, these parameters to the attribute can easily get out of sync with code, making them a potential hole to fall into.

Then think from the other side of your setup: how do you consume the data, what do you do with your IStrategyResult<> - does it really have to be generic or there is a specific way you could encapsulate the type of results? I can't quite imagine a plugin system that returns "anything" to the host. The hint is really in your dynamic Execute(...) - your parameters and your result have both lost their strong typing, showing you that strong-typing the plugin is not helping with anything. Just use object or - better - make a StrategyResult class instead of the current interface and provide whatever properties are necessary there (I've added a few frivolous examples), such as:

public class StrategyResult{
  public object Result{get;set;}
  public Type ResultType {get;set;}

  // frivolous examples
  public bool IsError {get;set;}
  public string ErrorMessage {get;set;}

  // really off-the-wall example
  public Func<StrategyHostContext,bool> ApplyResultToContext {get;set;}

  public StrategyResult(){
  }

  public StrategyResult FromStrategy(IStrategy strategy){
    return new StrategyResult{
      ResultType = strategy.ResultType
    } 
  }

  public StrategyResult FromStrategyExecute(IStrategy strategy, ISerializable info = null){
     var result = FromStrategy(strategy);
     try{
       strategy.Execute(info);
     } catch (Exception x){
       result.IsError = true;
       result.ErrorMessage = x.Message;
     }
  }
}

Then your IStrategy becomes:

public interface IStrategy{
  Type ResultType {get;}
  void Initialize(SomeContextClassMaybe context);
  StrategyResult Execute(ISerializable info = null); 
}

You can also change your attribute to make it more efficient to load large plugins:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Assembly)]
public sealed class AddinStrategyAttribute : Attribute
{
  public Type StategyType {get; private set;}
  public AddinStrategyAttribute(Type strategyType){
   StrategyType = strategyType;
  }
}

... and use the attribute like so:

[assembly:AddinStrategy(typeof(BoolStrategy))] // note it's outside the namespace
namespace MyNamespace{
    public class BoolStrategy: IStrategy{
      public Type ResultType { get{ return typeof(bool);}}
      public void Initialize (SomeContextClassMaybe context){
      }
      public StrategyResult Execute(ISerializable info = null){
        return StrategyResult.FromStrategyExecute(this,info);
      }
    }
}
3
  • So sorry for the late response everyone, I ended up getting put on another project for a bit. Now finally getting back to this.
    – Brandon
    Nov 9, 2015 at 14:56
  • The strong typing of the plugin was intended as a 'hint' so to speak to speed up processing. I didn't want to have to do a bunch of conditional blocks (which limits extensibility of the plugin without having to make changes to the core) or reflection in the caller (which could slow it down considering the volume of plugin calls that could be made. The way this plugin system should work, it could potentially be calling these things hundreds to thousands of times as it enumerates through the collection.
    – Brandon
    Nov 9, 2015 at 15:02
  • To achieve both (avoid lengthy ifs and performance) add a method inside the plugin that knows how to glue its own data to the context data - ApplyResultToContext is for that purpose specifically Nov 9, 2015 at 20:43
5

Assuming that the caller of ExecuteActions does not have any knowledge about the T in any of the plugins or results and must work with dynamic or object anyway, then the following may work:

Infrastructure:

public interface IStrategy
{
    IStrategyResult Execute(ISerializable info = null);
}

public interface IStrategyResult
{
    bool IsValid { get; }
    dynamic Value { get; }
}

public class StrategyResult<T> : IStrategyResult
{
    public T Value { get; private set; }
    public StrategyResult(T value) { this.Value = value; }

    public bool IsValid { get { throw new NotImplementedException(); } }

    dynamic IStrategyResult.Value { get { return this.Value; } }

}

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public sealed class RegisterActionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public List<string> Dependencies { get; private set; }

    public RegisterActionAttribute(params string[] depdencies)
    {
        this.Dependencies = new List<string>(depdencies);
    }
}

public class StrategyAction
{
    public string Name;
    public List<string> Dependencies;
}

public abstract class BasePlugin<T> : IStrategy
{
    public IStrategyResult Execute(ISerializable info = null)
    {
        return new StrategyResult<T>(this.execute(info));
    }
    protected abstract T execute(ISerializable info);
}

Example plugin:

[RegisterAction]
public class MyFirstPlugin: BasePlugin<bool>
{
    protected override bool execute(ISerializable info = null)
    {
        try
        {
           // do stuff
           return true;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

[RegisterAction("MyFirstPlugin")]
public class MySecondPlugin: BasePlugin<string>
{
    protected override string execute(ISerializable info = null)
    {
        try
        {
           // do stuff
           return "success";
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return "failed";
        }
    }
}

Example execution engine:

public class Engine
{

    public  List<StrategyAction>    registeredActions   = new List<StrategyAction>();
    private List<StrategyAction>    queuedActions       = new List<StrategyAction>();

    public IStrategyResult Execute(string action, ISerializable info = null)
    {
        if (this.registeredActions.FirstOrDefault(a=>a.Name == action) == null) return null;

        // This code did not appear to be used anyway
        //var returnType = typeof (IStrategyResult<>);                                              //var genericReturn = returnType.MakeGenericType(strategyAction.ResponseType);

        var instance = (IStrategy) UnityManager.Container.Resolve(typeof(IStrategy), action);

        return instance.Execute(info);
    }

    public List<IStrategyResult> ExecuteQueuedActions()
    {
        var results         = new List<IStrategyResult>();
        var actions         = this.queuedActions.AsQueryable();
        var sortedActions = TopologicalSort.Sort(actions, action => action.Dependencies, action => action.Name);
        foreach(var strategyAction in sortedActions)
        {
            this.queuedActions.Remove(strategyAction);
            results.Add(Execute(strategyAction.Name));
        }
        return results;
    }

}

Note that when the plugins are loaded, the RegisterActionAttribute information along with the name of the plugin type loaded need to be combined into a StrategyAction instance and loaded into the registeredActions field of the engine.

The above allows the plugins to work with strong types but still allows the engine to deal with a variety of types. If you need the engine to work with more strongly typed data, then please provide an example of how the callers of ExecuteQueuedActions are expected to work with the results from ExecuteQueuedActions.

2

You got into this pickle by giving your RegisterActionAttribute constructor the returnType argument. Since you have only one Execute() method, you are forced to deal with the fact that the return type can be different types.

Using dynamic is about as good as it gets. You can make Execute() generic but then you'll have to deal with a mismatch between its type parameter and the attribute's ResponseType. Not one that the compiler can catch, this fails at runtime. It isn't generic.

Frankly, this strongly sounds like one flexibility too many. At the risk of interpreting the point of having a return type incorrectly, the outcome of a "registration action" is rather boolean. It worked or it didn't work. And is in fact the way you implemented it, your first plugin snippet does return bool.

With very high odds that you should not use bool either. Failure ought to make a bang, you'd throw an exception.

2

Why not define a super interface IStrategyResult like this:

interface IStrategyResult
{
    Type ReturnType { get; }
}

interface IStrategyResult<T> : IStrategyResult
{
    // your code here
}

Then define your execute like this:

public IStrategyResult Execute(string action, params object[] parameters)

And have your StrategyResult : IStrategyResult<T> class set the property to return typeof(T)

By convention you could assume (or enforce using inheritance on an abstract StrategyResult<T> : IStrategyResult<T> class) the T to be the same as the ReturnType property of the non-generic IStrategyResult interface.

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