96

Given

let arr = [1,2,3];

function filter(num) {
  return new Promise((res, rej) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      if( num === 3 ) {
        res(num);
      } else {
        rej();
      }
    }, 1);
  });
 }

 function filterNums() {
   return Promise.all(arr.filter(filter));
 }

 filterNums().then(results => {
   let l = results.length;
   // length should be 1, but is 3
 });

The length is 3 because Promises are returned, not values. Is there a way to filter the array with a function that returns a Promise?

Note: For this example, fs.stat has been replaced with setTimeout, see https://github.com/silenceisgolden/learn-esnext/blob/array-filter-async-function/tutorials/array-filter-with-async-function.js for the specific code.

4
  • 3
    "Is there a way to filter the array with a function that returns a Promise?" Certainly not with using Array#filter. Oct 26, 2015 at 21:20
  • @FelixKling That is what I'm concluding as well, but can you explain the why behind this further? I'm not comprehending why this is the case; it does seem semi-logical to me.
    – ajklein
    Oct 26, 2015 at 21:40
  • 2
    because filter expects a function which returns a boolean, not a promise object Oct 26, 2015 at 21:40
  • @JonahWilliams Yes, I understand that. Changing the filter function to an async function produces the same results, so I'm guessing that also returns a promise instead of the await waiting for the returned boolean.
    – ajklein
    Oct 26, 2015 at 21:50

17 Answers 17

81

Here is a 2017 elegant solution using async/await :

Very straightforward usage:

const results = await filter(myArray, async num => {
  await doAsyncStuff()
  return num > 2
})

The helper function (copy this into your web page):

async function filter(arr, callback) {
  const fail = Symbol()
  return (await Promise.all(arr.map(async item => (await callback(item)) ? item : fail))).filter(i=>i!==fail)
}

Demo:

// Async IIFE
(async function() {
  const myArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

  // This is exactly what you'd expect to write 
  const results = await filter(myArray, async num => {
    await doAsyncStuff()
    return num > 2
  })

  console.log(results)
})()


// Arbitrary asynchronous function
function doAsyncStuff() {
  return Promise.resolve()
}


// The helper function
async function filter(arr, callback) {
  const fail = Symbol()
  return (await Promise.all(arr.map(async item => (await callback(item)) ? item : fail))).filter(i=>i!==fail)
}

I'll even throw in a CodePen.

6
  • 1
    This has a subtle difference in behaviour to normal Array.filter: if you try to filter an array in a way that includes undefined elements, you'll lose them. E.g. filter([1, 2, undefined, 3], (x) => x !== 1) will return [2, 3], not [2, undefined, 3], as it should.
    – Tim Perry
    Dec 4, 2017 at 10:48
  • @TimPerry correct, feel free to revise the answer so something that makes more sense :)
    – Gabe Rogan
    Dec 4, 2017 at 16:27
  • 1
    One option would be to return a Symbol sentinel value instead of undefined.
    – Tamlyn
    Apr 30, 2018 at 14:55
  • @Tamlyn added Symbol sentinel to fix undefined situation :)
    – Gabe Rogan
    Apr 30, 2018 at 15:30
  • Probably this function should be renamed into something different like filterAsync. I confess that, in my rash SO-and-paste workflow, have only read the first paragraph of your answer, sawn that you used filter(), and assumed Array.filter would support asynchronous callbacks ... 🙃 Sep 13, 2021 at 22:02
47

As mentioned in the comments, Array.prototype.filter is synchronous and therefore does not support Promises.

Since you can now (theoretically) subclass built-in types with ES6, you should be able to add your own asynchronous method which wraps the existing filter function:

Note: I've commented out the subclassing, because it's not supported by Babel just yet for Arrays

class AsyncArray /*extends Array*/ {
  constructor(arr) {
    this.data = arr; // In place of Array subclassing
  }

  filterAsync(predicate) {
     // Take a copy of the array, it might mutate by the time we've finished
    const data = Array.from(this.data);
    // Transform all the elements into an array of promises using the predicate
    // as the promise
    return Promise.all(data.map((element, index) => predicate(element, index, data)))
    // Use the result of the promises to call the underlying sync filter function
      .then(result => {
        return data.filter((element, index) => {
          return result[index];
        });
      });
  }
}
// Create an instance of your subclass instead
let arr = new AsyncArray([1,2,3,4,5]);
// Pass in your own predicate
arr.filterAsync(async (element) => {
  return new Promise(res => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      res(element > 3);
    }, 1);
  });
}).then(result => {
  console.log(result)
});

Babel REPL Demo

4
  • This is invalid since super() must be called before any assignment to this inside constructor Apr 21, 2017 at 17:05
  • 1
    @FarzadYZ The implementation of subclass was just an example. You wouldn't need a constructor with true subclassing, as you would be using the base Array constructor and not using your own data store Apr 21, 2017 at 17:13
  • 1
    You're right, I was just warning for the folks who blindly copy-paste the accepted answer :) Apr 21, 2017 at 17:15
  • @FarzadYZ Ah good point, it does look like you can just uncomment that block and have it work... Apr 21, 2017 at 17:17
33

For typescript folk (or es6 just remove type syntax)

function mapAsync<T, U>(array: T[], callbackfn: (value: T, index: number, array: T[]) => Promise<U>): Promise<U[]> {
  return Promise.all(array.map(callbackfn));
}

async function filterAsync<T>(array: T[], callbackfn: (value: T, index: number, array: T[]) => Promise<boolean>): Promise<T[]> {
  const filterMap = await mapAsync(array, callbackfn);
  return array.filter((value, index) => filterMap[index]);
}

es6

function mapAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  return Promise.all(array.map(callbackfn));
}

async function filterAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  const filterMap = await mapAsync(array, callbackfn);
  return array.filter((value, index) => filterMap[index]);
}

es5

function mapAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  return Promise.all(array.map(callbackfn));
}

function filterAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  return mapAsync(array, callbackfn).then(filterMap => {
    return array.filter((value, index) => filterMap[index]);
  });
}

edit: demo

function mapAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  return Promise.all(array.map(callbackfn));
}

function filterAsync(array, callbackfn) {
  return mapAsync(array, callbackfn).then(filterMap => {
    return array.filter((value, index) => filterMap[index]);
  });
}

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 4];

function isThreeAsync(number) {
  return new Promise((res, rej) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      res(number === 3);
    }, 1);
  });
}

mapAsync(arr, isThreeAsync).then(result => {
  console.log(result); // [ false, false, true, false ]
});

filterAsync(arr, isThreeAsync).then(result => {
  console.log(result); // [ 3 ]
});

2
  • 3
    This is a great answer. Only tweak I made was to add readonly to the array parameter types.
    – Will Stone
    Nov 5, 2019 at 9:55
  • 1
    Needs a demonstration of how to call it Apr 13, 2020 at 15:13
31

Here's a way:

var wait = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
var filter = num => wait(1).then(() => num == 3);

var filterAsync = (array, filter) =>
  Promise.all(array.map(entry => filter(entry)))
  .then(bits => array.filter(entry => bits.shift()));

filterAsync([1,2,3], filter)
.then(results => console.log(results.length))
.catch(e => console.error(e));

The filterAsync function takes an array and a function that must either return true or false or return a promise that resolves to true or false, what you asked for (almost, I didn't overload promise rejection because I think that's a bad idea). Let me know if you have any questions about it.

var wait = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
var filter = num => wait(1).then(() => num == 3);

var filterAsync = (array, filter) =>
  Promise.all(array.map(entry => filter(entry)))
  .then(bits => array.filter(entry => bits.shift()));

filterAsync([1,2,3], filter)
.then(results => console.log(results.length))
.catch(e => console.error(e));

var console = { log: msg => div.innerHTML += msg + "<br>",
                error: e => console.log(e +", "+ (e.lineNumber-25)) };
<div id="div"></div>

0
11

Promise Reducer to the rescue!

[1, 2, 3, 4].reduce((op, n) => {
    return op.then(filteredNs => {
        return new Promise(resolve => {
            setTimeout(() => {
                if (n >= 3) {
                    console.log("Keeping", n);
                    resolve(filteredNs.concat(n))
                } else {
                    console.log("Dropping", n);
                    resolve(filteredNs);
                }
            }, 1000);
        });
    });
}, Promise.resolve([]))
.then(filteredNs => console.log(filteredNs));

Reducers are awesome. "Reduce my problem to my goal" seems to be a pretty good strategy for anything more complex than what the simple tools will solve for you, i.e. filtering an array of things that aren't all available immediately.

7

asyncFilter method:

Array.prototype.asyncFilter = async function(f){
    var array = this;
    var booleans = await Promise.all(array.map(f));
    return array.filter((x,i)=>booleans[i])
}
2
  • just wondering, would it work if any of the callback rejects the promise/throws an error ?
    – sktguha
    Sep 4, 2020 at 20:00
  • @sktguha if any promise rejects or throws, asyncFilter will reject as well.
    – RedGuy11
    Jan 23 at 21:26
5

Late to the game but since no one else mentioned it, Bluebird supports Promise.map which is my go-to for filters requiring aysnc processing for the condition,

function filterAsync(arr) {
    return Promise.map(arr, num => {
        if (num === 3) return num;
    })
        .filter(num => num !== undefined)
}
1
4

In case someone is interested in modern typescript solution (with fail symbol used for filtering):

const failSymbol = Symbol();

export async function filterAsync<T>(
  itemsToFilter: T[],
  filterFunction: (item: T) => Promise<boolean>,
): Promise<T[]> {
  const itemsOrFailFlags = await Promise.all(
    itemsToFilter.map(async (item) => {
      const hasPassed = await filterFunction(item);

      return hasPassed ? item : failSymbol;
    }),
  );

  return itemsOrFailFlags.filter(
    (itemOrFailFlag) => itemOrFailFlag !== failSymbol,
  ) as T[];
}
4

Two lines, completely typesafe

export const asyncFilter = async <T>(list: T[], predicate: (t: T) => Promise<boolean>) => {
  const resolvedPredicates = await Promise.all(list.map(predicate));
  return list.filter((item, idx) => resolvedPredicates[idx]);
};
3

There is a one liner to to do that.

const filterPromise = (values, fn) => 
    Promise.all(values.map(fn)).then(booleans => values.filter((_, i) => booleans[i]));

Pass the array into values and the function into fn.

More description on how this one liner works is available here.

2
  • 1
    This is rather beautiful. I needed to filter an array of data by making an async HTTP request to validate each row against a third party system. This totally sorted it out. Thank you! (for the record, something like: filterPromise(rows, (row) => { return axios.get(blah blah returns a Promise).then( data => { return data.passes.the.boolean.test; }) }).then( resultRows => { resolve(resultRows); }) .. (in my case I was already in an async function that has a resolve function that would resolve the Promise returned by my function). Hope that helps someone :)
    – Neek
    Jan 21, 2021 at 8:42
  • 1
    Edit: used lodasync in the end, see Keller's post below, but still, it's nice to see the algorithm laid out in all its beauty :)
    – Neek
    Jan 21, 2021 at 9:17
2

For production purposes you probably want to use a lib like lodasync:

import { filterAsync } from 'lodasync'

const result = await filterAsync(async(element) => {
  await doSomething()
  return element > 3
}, array)

Under the hood, it maps your array by invoking the callback on each element and filters the array using the result. But you should not reinvent the wheel.

1

You can do something like this...

theArrayYouWantToFilter = await new Promise(async (resolve) => {
  const tempArray = [];

  theArrayYouWantToFilter.filter(async (element, index) => {
    const someAsyncValue = await someAsyncFunction();

    if (someAsyncValue) {
      tempArray.push(someAsyncValue);
    }

    if (index === theArrayYouWantToFilter.length - 1) {
      resolve(tempArray);
    }
  });
});

Wrapped within an async function...


async function filter(theArrayYouWantToFilter) {
  theArrayYouWantToFilter = await new Promise(async (resolve) => {
    const tempArray = [];

    theArrayYouWantToFilter.filter(async (element, index) => {
      const someAsyncValue = await someAsyncFunction();

      if (someAsyncValue) {
        tempArray.push(someAsyncValue);
      }

      if (index === theArrayYouWantToFilter.length - 1) {
        resolve(tempArray);
      }
    });
  });

  return theArrayYouWantToFilter;
}
0

A valid way to do this (but it seems too messy):

let arr = [1,2,3];

function filter(num) {
  return new Promise((res, rej) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      if( num === 3 ) {
        res(num);
      } else {
        rej();
      }
    }, 1);
  });
}

async function check(num) {
  try {
    await filter(num);
    return true;
  } catch(err) {
    return false;
  }
}

(async function() {
  for( let num of arr ) {
    let res = await check(num);
    if(!res) {
      let index = arr.indexOf(num);
      arr.splice(index, 1);
    }
  }
})();

Again, seems way too messy.

1
  • 1
    FYI the async/await keywords are ES7 (Candidate) not ES6 Oct 27, 2015 at 7:38
0

A variant of @DanRoss's:

async function filterNums(arr) {
  return await arr.reduce(async (res, val) => {
    res = await res
    if (await filter(val)) {
      res.push(val)
    }
    return res
  }, Promise.resolve([]))
}

Note that if (as in current case) you don't have to worry about filter() having side effects that need to be serialized, you can also do:

async function filterNums(arr) {
  return await arr.reduce(async (res, val) => {
    if (await filter(val)) {
      (await res).push(val)
    }
    return res
  }, Promise.resolve([]))
}
0

Late to the party, and I know that my answer is similar to other already posted answers, but the function I'm going to share is ready for be dropped into any code and be used. As usual, when you have to do complex operations on arrays, reduce is king:

const filterAsync = (asyncPred) => arr => 
  arr.reduce(async (acc,item) => {
    const pass = await asyncPred(item);
    if(pass) (await acc).push(item);
    return acc;
  },[]);

It uses modern syntax so make sure your target supports it. To be 100% correct you should use Promise.resolve([]) as the initial value, but JS just doesn't care and this way it is way shorter.

Then you can use it like this:

var wait = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
const isOdd = x => wait(1).then(()=>x%2);
(filterAsync(isOdd)([1,2,3,4,4])).then(console.log) // => [1,3]
1
  • If I understand it correctly, this version checks the predicates serially, so it's likely to be slower than @GabeRogan's parallel map() which I think is the best (and should be the accepted answer).
    – GaryO
    Mar 6, 2020 at 23:15
0

Here's a shorter version of @pie6k's Typescript version:

async function filter<T>(arr: T[], callback: (val: T) => Promise<Boolean>) {
  const fail = Symbol()
  const result = (await Promise.all(arr.map(async item => (await callback(item)) ? item : fail))).filter(i => i !== fail)
  return result as T[] // the "fail" entries are all filtered out so this is OK
}
1
  • You should use a type guard instead of a type assertion here. .filter((i): i is Awaited<T> => i !== fail);
    – tlt
    Nov 27, 2021 at 13:54
0

An efficient way of approaching this is by processing arrays as iterables, so you can apply any number of required operations in a single iteration.

The example below uses library iter-ops for that:

import {pipe, filter, toAsync} from 'iter-ops';

const arr = [1, 2, 3]; // synchronous iterable

const i = pipe(
    toAsync(arr), // make our iterable asynchronous
    filter(async (value, index) => {
        // returns Promise<boolean>
    })
);

(async function() {
    for await (const a of i) {
        console.log(a); // print values
    }
})();

All operators within the library support asynchronous predicates when inside an asynchronous pipeline (why we use toAsync), and you can add other operators, in the same way.

Use of Promise.all for this is quite inefficient, because you block the entire array from any further processing that can be done concurrently, which the above approach allows.

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