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I am trying to write a regex that selects everything between two characters.

For example, when the regex encounters a '§' I want it to select everything after the '§' sign, up until the point that the regex encounters a ';'. I tried with a lookbehind and lookahead, but they don't really do the trick.

So for example " § 1-2 bla; " should return " 1-2 bla".

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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  • 3
    Please specify the technology in which you are working, as regex has many "flavours" with slightly different syntaxes and capabilities.
    – Jay
    Jul 26, 2010 at 14:08
  • 1
    Wait, I missed this first time around... "I tried with a lookbehind and lookahead, but they don't really do the trick." -- why not? what went wrong? Is this JavaScript? Jul 26, 2010 at 14:54
  • 2
    Because I'm new to RegEx and couldn't really figure it out.. It's RegEx in Actionscript 3, and it does really weird things from time to time :) thanks for your answers everyone, I kind of got things working !
    – Jaaq
    Jul 27, 2010 at 7:50

4 Answers 4

72

How about

"§([^;]*);"

The selected characters between the § and ; are available as match group 1.

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  • 2
    This worked for me. But out of curiosity, it also worked without the trailing semi-colon. Why is it necessary? Jul 31, 2015 at 18:04
  • 2
    Yes, the trailing semi-colon isn't required. Works fine without that too.
    – MixCoded
    Nov 27, 2017 at 9:07
  • If using in VSCode, remove the trailing semi-colon and the quotes Jul 25, 2023 at 18:06
45

Use this regex

(?<=§).*?(?=;)
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20

For a simple case this should do:

§(.*);

It might need to be modified if you don't want to allow nesting:

§(.*?);
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  • 8
    This isn't quite correct - the .* is greedy, so the expression will match upto the last ; encountered, not the first one. Jul 26, 2010 at 14:30
  • @Peter: it might not be the issue for OP, and it might be what OP actually wants. Jul 26, 2010 at 14:31
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    Well based on "up until the point that the regex encounters a ';'" -- I take that to mean it shouldn't be greedy. Jul 26, 2010 at 14:53
  • @Peter: well based on given example it doesn't matter if quantifier is greedy or not. Jul 26, 2010 at 15:09
  • Exactly what I needed to clean out some extraneous decimal values.
    – monsto
    Mar 19, 2019 at 8:33
11

If you have multiple § (char example) use : §([^§]*)§

It will ignore everything between two § and only take what's between the 2 special char, so if you have something like §What§ kind of §bear§ is best, it will output: §what§ , §bear§

What happening? lets dissect the expression § then ([^§]*) then §

  1. 1- match § char
  2. 2- match anything but § [^§] 0 or more times *
  3. match § char

Hope it helps !

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