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How can I disable Octave from creating an octave-workspace file within the working directory when it crashes?

I don't see any option to disable it in octave_core_file_options(). Is this possible? Maybe through a hack by automatically removing the file at termination? (the problem is .octaverc runs at start)

Related (but not duplicate): Hide octave-workspace file from home directory

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What you're looking for is crash_dumps_octave_core:

Query or set the internal variable that controls whether Octave tries to save all current variables to the file 'octave-workspace' if it crashes or receives a hangup, terminate or similar signal.

Just for completeness, the reason why this family of functions (octave_core_file_limit, octave_core_file_name, and octave_core_file_options) have "octave_core" on the name instead of "octave_workspace", is that on older releases the default name of the file was "octave-workspace".

How could you have found this yourself?

  1. from your question, you already knew about octave_core_file_options. If you see the bottom of that function help text, you will find:

    See also: crash_dumps_octave_core, octave_core_file_name, octave_core_file_limit.

  2. Take a look at the manual section about this function by calling doc octave_core
  3. you can use the lookfor command to search functions:

    octave> lookfor octave_core
    crash_dumps_octave_core Query or set the internal variable that controls whethe
                        r Octave  tries to save all current variables to the file '
                        'octave-workspace'  if it crashes or receives a hangup, ter
                        rminate or similar signal.
    octave_core_file_limit Query or set the internal variable that specifies the ma
                        ximum  amount of memory (in kilobytes) of the top-level wor
                        rkspace that  Octave will attempt to save when writing data
                        a to the crash dump  file (the name of the file is specifie
                        ed by OCTAVE_CORE_FILE_NAME).
    octave_core_file_name Query or set the internal variable that specifies the nam
                        e of the  file used for saving data from the top-level work
                        kspace if Octave  aborts.
    octave_core_file_options Query or set the internal variable that specifies the 
                        options used  for saving the workspace data if Octave abort
                        ts.
    sighup_dumps_octave_core Query or set the internal variable that controls wheth
                        er Octave  tries to save all current variables to the file
                        'octave-workspace'  if it receives a hangup signal.
    sigterm_dumps_octave_core Query or set the internal variable that controls whet
                        her Octave  tries to save all current variables to the file
                        e 'octave-workspace'  if it receives a terminate signal.
    
  • Oh thanks. I am a long time Octave user and I was under the impression that the octave-workspace was created always, not just when you have errors. I guess I never make one script without some error hehe. The filename is very unintuitive. Thanks again! – Ricardo Cruz Oct 27 '15 at 17:56
  • @RicardoCruz it's not every time you get an error, it's when it crashes. If you always get one, you must be doing something wrong. What are you doing to exit Octave? – carandraug Oct 27 '15 at 18:02
  • ah!! I just close the terminal window while it is still running oh... that's why creates the core file... I feel embarrassed :P – Ricardo Cruz Oct 27 '15 at 18:04
  • @RicardoCruz there is an exit() function to actually exit Octave. You can also use <kbd>Ctrl-D</kbd> keyboard shortcut (sends EOF signal, not sure if it works in non-Linux) – carandraug Oct 27 '15 at 18:07
  • Yes, I know, it's just out of laziness. :) By the way, I have rephrased the question slightly to reflect the fact the file only gets created on crashes. – Ricardo Cruz Oct 27 '15 at 20:09

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