9

I know this can be easily done using regex like I answered on https://stackoverflow.com/a/33379831/3962126, however I need to do this in bash.

So the closest question on Stackoverflow I found is this one bash: extracting last two dirs for a pathname, however the difference is that if

DIRNAME = /a/b/c/d/e

then I need to extract

d
10
  • 1
    Does $(basename $(dirname "$DIRNAME")) meet your requirements? Failing that, does x=${DIRNAME%/*}; echo ${x##*/} do the job you require? Beware degenerate cases. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:06
  • I saw your comment after I posted my answer below. Yes, it does. I really don't understand how/why this command extracts the string between the last two slashes, but I don't care as far as it works for me.
    – Sasha
    Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:10
  • 1
    The dirname command drops the last component of the file name, removing the /e; the basename command drops all except the last component of the file name, removing the /a/b/c, leaving just d. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:12
  • @Jonathan, notice the solution x=${DIRNAME%/*}; echo ${x##*/} also matches d here: DIRNAME=a/b, and I think that's not what the OP wants.
    – whoan
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 10:04
  • @JonathanLeffler, that's a bit buggy as given -- you need quotes around the dirname expansion too. Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 14:06

6 Answers 6

12

This may be relatively long, but it's also much faster to execute than most preceding answers (other than the zsh-only one and that by j.a.), since it uses only string manipulations built into bash and uses no subshell expansions:

string='/a/b/c/d/e'  # initial data
dir=${string%/*}     # trim everything past the last /
dir=${dir##*/}       # ...then remove everything before the last / remaining
printf '%s\n' "$dir" # demonstrate output

printf is used in the above because echo doesn't work reliably for all values (think about what it would do on a GNU system with /a/b/c/-n/e).

5
  • This might be the best answer as it's also stricly POSIX-compliant. Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 8:38
  • The only problem with this @gniourf is that it matches also any string before the last slash (e.g. string="d/e" matches d) and the OP asked for the string between the last two slashes.
    – whoan
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 9:59
  • It even prints any string if there is no slashes (e.g.: string=hello -> prints hello).
    – whoan
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 10:38
  • @j.a., I don't read either case as a bug -- both fall outside the assumptions implicit in the specification. If one wanted to put in a if [[ $string = */*/* ]]; then ... fi wrapping this code to avoid them both, trivially done. Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 14:03
  • It should be noted that this solution performs significantly better than that of @j.a. at scale. Even with the above check in place, I see ~1.07 seconds for 1,000,000 iterations on the path /home/a/b/c/d/e/f/g.txt, vs. ~7.57 seconds for the regex replacement solution. Commented Dec 7, 2015 at 19:41
4

Here a pure bash solution:

[[ $DIRNAME =~ /([^/]+)/[^/]*$ ]] && printf '%s\n' "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"

Compared to some of the other answers:

  • It matches the string between the last two slashes. So, for example, it doesn't match d if DIRNAME=d/e.
  • It's shorter and fast (just uses built-ins and doesn't create subprocesses).
  • Support any character between last two slashes (see Charles Duffy's answer for more on this).

Also notice that is not the way to assign a variable in bash:

DIRNAME = /a/b/c/d/e
       ^ ^

Those spaces are wrong, so remove them:

DIRNAME=/a/b/c/d/e
3

Using awk:

echo "/a/b/c/d/e" | awk -F / '{ print $(NF-1) }' # d

Edit: This does not work when the path contains newlines, and still gives output when there are less than two slashes, see comments below.

3
  • This also matches d here: DIRNAME=a/b and the OP asked for the string between the last two slashes.
    – whoan
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 10:30
  • This even prints any string if there is no slashes (e.g.: echo hello | awk -F / '{ print $(NF-1) }' -> prints hello).
    – whoan
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 10:40
  • ...and gives incorrect results when the filename contains literal newlines. Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 15:12
1

Using sed

if you want to get the fourth element

DIRNAME="/a/b/c/d/e"
echo "$DIRNAME" | sed -r 's_^(/[^/]*){3}/([^/]*)/.*$_\2_g'

if you want to get the before last element

DIRNAME="/a/b/c/d/e"
echo "$DIRNAME" | sed -r 's_^.*/([^/]*)/[^/]*$_\1_g'
5
  • Wildly inefficient compared to using built-in string manipulation. (Though that's true of the awk answer and the basename/dirname one too). Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:26
  • Also, buggy due to lack of quotes -- look at what happens if your DIRNAME contains a glob expression that actually matches anything, or runs of whitespace. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:31
  • yes, is better string manipulation, only, sed is another solution ..... in which test case failure, a example? Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:37
  • Consider for instance DIRNAME='/a/b/c/ * d * /e', where the whitespace and literal asterisk are part of the directory name. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:42
  • 1
    Will also behave weirdly if there are newlines in DIRNAME. Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 8:36
1

OMG, maybe this was obvious, but not to me initially. I got the right result with:

dir=$(basename -- "$(dirname -- "$str")")
echo "$dir"
3
  • The correct way to write that would have been dir=$(basename "$(dirname "$str")"). Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:25
  • ...otherwise, you'll get bugs when your strings contain whitespace, glob expressions that match files, etc. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:25
  • ...also, this is slow enough that you wouldn't want to put it in an inner loop that's run hundreds or thousands of times; command substitutions (that is, the $(...) syntax) have a substantial performance penalty. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:29
0

Using zsh parameter substitution is pretty cool too

echo ${${DIRNAME%/*}##*/}

I think it's faster than the double $() as well, because it won't need any subprocesses.

Basically it slices off the right side first, and then all the remaining left side second.

1
  • 3
    Which version of Bash supports that nested substitution? zsh does, but not Bash AFAIK — but I'm here to learn too. Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 23:11

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