7

I can see that that classes are treated as complex objects which are required for calling default constructor:

void QVector<T>::defaultConstruct(T *from, T *to)
{
    if (QTypeInfo<T>::isComplex) {
        while (from != to) {
            new (from++) T();
        }
    ...
}

But it's not clear why is it needed to construct objects in the 'hidden' area of QVector. I mean these objects are not accessible at all, so why not just to reserve the memory instead of the real object creation?

And as a bonus question, I would like to ask, if I want to have an array of non-default-constractible objects, can I safely replace QVector<T> with QVector<Wrapper<T>? where Wrapper is something like that:

class Wrapper {
public:
    union {
        T object;
        bool hack;
    };
    Wrapper() {}
    Wrapper(const T &t) : object { t }  {}
    Wrapper(const Wrapper &t) : object { t.object } {}

    Wrapper &operator=(const Wrapper &value) {
        object = value.object;
        return *this;
    }

    ~Wrapper() {}
};
12
  • If an object does not have a default constructor, it is usually for a reason. I'd advise against hacking. Maybe try storing std::unique_ptr in your wrapper. – Neil Kirk Oct 27 '15 at 23:42
  • 4
    The default constructor is used by QVector(int) and resize(int) for elements that are actually in the vector. – aschepler Oct 27 '15 at 23:46
  • 1
    @NeilKirk I don't see any advantages in usage of std::unique_ptr over this hack, while there is a huge disadvantage in grinding the memory which will bring to naught the advantages of QVector itself. Also, please don't forget, that std::vector doesn't have a requirement for having a default constructor. – Grief Oct 27 '15 at 23:51
  • 1
    No, placement new lets you put your object in a buffer of your choosing. It could be a member of your wrapper. If you try to use your object - including copying a new object into it - when it was created using the "default constructor" thanks to your hack, it is undefined behavior. – Neil Kirk Oct 27 '15 at 23:59
  • 1
    T QVector::value(int i) const also needs a default constructor because if index is out of bounds, you get a default value. – ymoreau Nov 17 '17 at 10:13
0

It's easy enough to make the QVector work for a non-default-constructible type T:

#define QVECTOR_NON_DEFAULT_CONSTRUCTIBLE(Type) \
template <> QVector<Type>::QVector(int) = delete; \
template <> void QVector<Type>::resize(int newSize) { \
   Q_ASSERT(newSize <= size()); \
   detach(); \
} \
template <> void QVector<Type>::defaultConstruct(Type*, Type*) { Q_ASSERT(false); }

The macro needs to be present right after MyType declaration - in the header file (if any), and it must be in namespace or global scope:

struct MyType { ... };
QVECTOR_NON_DEFAULT_CONSTRUCTIBLE(MyType)

struct A {
  struct MyType2 { ... };
};
QVECTOR_NON_DEFAULT_CONSTRUCTIBLE(A::MyType2);

No, the wrapper is not correct. It doesn't destruct the object member. It also doesn't offer move semantics, doesn't protect from being default-constructed, etc. The hack union member is not necessary. Nothing in a union will be default-constructed for you.

Here's a more correct wrapper - it pretty much resembles std::optional. See here to see how much nuance an optional needs :)

// https://github.com/KubaO/stackoverflown/tree/master/questions/vector-nodefault-33380402

template <typename T> class Wrapper final {
   union {
      T object;
   };
   bool no_object = false;
   void cond_destruct() {
      if (!no_object)
         object.~T();
      no_object = true;
   }
public:
   Wrapper() : no_object(true) {}
   Wrapper(const Wrapper &o) : no_object(o.no_object) {
      if (!no_object)
         new (&object) T(o.object);
   }
   Wrapper(Wrapper &&o) : no_object(o.no_object) {
      if (!no_object)
         new (&object) T(std::move(o.object));
   }
   Wrapper(const T &o) : object(o) {}
   Wrapper(T &&o) : object(std::move(o)) {}
   template <class...Args> Wrapper(Args...args) : object(std::forward<Args>(args)...) {}
   template <class U, class...Args> Wrapper(std::initializer_list<U> init, Args...args) :
      object(init, std::forward<Args>(args)...) {}
   operator T&      () &      { assert(!no_object); return object; }
   operator T&&     () &&     { assert(!no_object); return std::move(object); }
   operator T const&() const& { assert(!no_object); return object; }
   Wrapper &operator=(const Wrapper &o) & {
      if (no_object)
         ::new (&object) T(o);
      else
         object = o.object;
      no_object = false;
      return *this;
   }
   Wrapper &operator=(Wrapper &&o) & {
      if (no_object)
         ::new (&object) T(std::move(o.object));
      else
         object = std::move(o.object);
      no_object = false;
      return *this;
   }
   template<class... Args> T &emplace(Args&&... args) {
      cond_destruct();
      ::new (&object) T(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
      no_object = false;
      return object;
   }
   ~Wrapper() {
      cond_destruct();
   }
};

Since the assignment operators are ref-qualified, it disallows assigning to rvalues, so it has the IMHO positive property that the following won't compile:

Wrapper<int>() = 1   // likely Wrapper<int>() == 1 was intended
3
  • detach() ensures that the container doesn't share data with any other instance: if it did, a deep copy is made. – Kuba hasn't forgotten Monica Sep 10 '18 at 16:26
  • But then if I understood it correctly, the resize function won't actually resize anything. That would also mean that clear() won't clear the container, since if you look at the source code, clear() calls resize(0). – Donald Duck Sep 10 '18 at 17:09
  • That’s correct. As far as I can remember now, it is a limitation necessary to have QVector support those types: it doesn’t leave all functionality intact. It’s a shortcoming of the design of this class. I imagine that sometime soon, Qt’s Containers will become deprecated and retained for backwards compatibility — I may be wrong, but changes to extend their functionality are not accepted — the goal being not to back the API into some unwieldy corner. It’d be worth checking whether some firm roadmap decisions were made in that regard. – Kuba hasn't forgotten Monica Sep 11 '18 at 12:30

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