168

I want to be able to pass text with HTML tags, like so:

<MyComponent text="This is <strong>not</strong> working." />

But inside of MyComponent's render method, when I print out this.props.text, it literally prints out everything:

This is <strong>not</strong> working.

Is there some way to make React parse HTML and dump it out properly?

3
  • What is your actual render function?
    – Lucio
    Oct 28, 2015 at 1:17
  • 3
    The typical pattern would be to make your content children of your component <MyComponent>This is <strong>not</strong> working</MyComponent>, instead of passing them as props. Could you give more context on what you are actually trying to accomplish? Oct 28, 2015 at 1:23
  • Almost the same question: Reactjs convert to html.
    – totymedli
    Sep 28, 2017 at 12:24

22 Answers 22

185

You can use mixed arrays with strings and JSX elements (see the docs here):

<MyComponent text={["This is ", <strong>not</strong>,  "working."]} />

There's a fiddle here that shows it working: http://jsfiddle.net/7s7dee6L/

Also, as a last resort, you always have the ability to insert raw HTML but be careful because that can open you up to a cross-site scripting (XSS) attack if aren't sanitizing the property values.

7
  • 11
    This works, except I now get a warning: Warning: Each child in an array or iterator should have a unique "key" prop. Check the render method of CTA. It was passed a child from Template1. See fb.me/react-warning-keys for more information.
    – ffxsam
    Oct 28, 2015 at 1:37
  • 3
    You can make this error go away by going through the array and adding the index as a key in MyComponent {text.map( textOrHTML, index) => <span key={index}>{textOrHTML}</span> )} Although, it's just so strange that we have to do this in the first place entirely.
    – HussienK
    Jul 6, 2016 at 16:09
  • 8
    You can also fix the warning by putting key="[some unique value]" on the <strong> element. Oct 24, 2017 at 22:23
  • Nice, working fine, I would like to know how could I use a variable inside strong instead of string 'not' Jul 26, 2018 at 6:07
  • 9
    In order to remove array key warning, it is also possible now to pass a single JSX like this. <MyComponent text={<>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</>} />
    – Arif
    Mar 13, 2020 at 17:03
157
+250

Actually, there are multiple ways to go with that.

You want to use JSX inside your props

You can simply use {} to cause JSX to parse the parameter. The only limitation is the same as for every JSX element: It must return only one root element.

myProp={<div><SomeComponent>Some String</div>}

The best readable way to go for this is to create a function renderMyProp that will return JSX components (just like the standard render function) and then simply call myProp={ this.renderMyProp() }

You want to pass only HTML as a string

By default, JSX doesn't let you render raw HTML from string values. However, there is a way to make it do that:

myProp="<div>This is some html</div>"

Then in your component you can use it like that:

<div dangerouslySetInnerHTML=myProp={{ __html: this.renderMyProp() }}></div>

Beware that this solution 'can' open on cross-site scripting forgeries attacks. Also beware that you can only render simple HTML, no JSX tag or component or other fancy things.

The array way

In react, you can pass an array of JSX elements. That means:

myProp={["This is html", <span>Some other</span>, "and again some other"]}

I wouldn't recommend this method because:

  • It will create a warning (missing keys)
  • It's not readable
  • It's not really the JSX way, it's more a hack than an intended design.

The children way

Adding it for the sake of completeness but in react, you can also get all children that are 'inside' your component.

So if I take the following code:

<SomeComponent>
    <div>Some content</div>
    <div>Some content</div>
</SomeComponent>

Then the two divs will be available as this.props.children in SomeComponent and can be rendered with the standard {} syntax.

This solution is perfect when you have only one HTML content to pass to your Component (Imagine a Popin component that only takes the content of the Popin as children).

However, if you have multiple contents, you can't use children (or you need at least to combine it with another solution here)

3
  • 1
    this.props.childrens - but this.props.children. Without 's' reactjs.org/docs/glossary.html#propschildren Jun 23, 2018 at 16:46
  • 2
    This is a far better answer and should be the one selected as such.
    – Des
    Aug 26, 2020 at 16:20
  • If you do not want to add more HTML wrap in <> .... </>
    – Nicholas
    Jun 3, 2021 at 7:11
24

From React v16.02 you can use a Fragment.

<MyComponent text={<Fragment>This is an <strong>HTML</strong> string.</Fragment>} />

More info: https://reactjs.org/blog/2017/11/28/react-v16.2.0-fragment-support.html

2
  • This is the most useful answer if you are reading it in 2020
    – newbie
    Nov 2, 2020 at 22:45
  • 3
    This only works for HTML you're defining inline, right? You can't do <>{myHtml}</> or something like that?
    – Noumenon
    Jun 30, 2021 at 14:09
17

You can use dangerouslySetInnerHTML

Just send the html as a normal string

<MyComponent text="This is <strong>not</strong> working." />

And render in in the JSX code like this:

<h2 className="header-title-right wow fadeInRight"
    dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{__html: props.text}} />

Just be careful if you are rendering data entered by the user. You can be victim of a XSS attack

Here's the documentation: https://facebook.github.io/react/tips/dangerously-set-inner-html.html

1
  • works nicely as I have to use a variable to put HTML content. Jun 27 at 19:08
8
<MyComponent text={<span>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</span>} />

and then in your component you can do prop checking like so:

import React from 'react';
export default class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  static get propTypes() {
    return {
      text: React.PropTypes.object, // if you always want react components
      text: React.PropTypes.any, // if you want both text or react components
    }
  }
}

Make sure you choose only one prop type.

8

On a client-side react application, there are a couple of ways of rendering a prop as a string with some html. One safer than the other...

1 - Define the prop as jsx (my preference)

const someProps = {
  greeting: {<div>Hello<a href="/${name_profile}">${name_profile}</a></div>}
}


const GreetingComopnent = props => (
  <p>{props.someProps.greeting}</p>
)

• The only requirement here is that whatever file is generating this prop needs to include React as a dependency (in case you're generating the prop's jsx in a helper file etc).

2 - Dangerously set the innerHtml

const someProps = {
  greeting: '<React.Fragment>Hello<a href="/${name_profile}">${name_profile}</a></React.Fragment>'
}

const GreetingComponent = props => {
  const innerHtml = { __html: props.someProps.greeting }
  return <p dangerouslySetInnerHtml={innerHtml}></p>
}

• This second approach is discouraged. Imagine an input field whose input value is rendered as a prop in this component. A user could enter a script tag in the input and the component that renders this input would execute this potentially malicious code. As such, this approach has the potential to introduce cross-site scripting vulnerabilities. For more information, refer to the official React docs

8

You can use the <></> Fragments to pass the HTML in the props.

<MyComponent text={<>"This is <strong>not</strong> working."</>} />

Reference: https://reactjs.org/blog/2017/11/28/react-v16.2.0-fragment-support.html#jsx-fragment-syntax

1
  • fits perfect for me. Don't need double quotes, as long as you don't want to render them on the screen: <MyComponent text={<>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</>} />
    – Falco
    Jun 17 at 6:22
7

For me It worked by passing html tag in props children

<MyComponent>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</MyComponent>


var MyComponent = React.createClass({

   render: function() {
    return (
      <div>this.props.children</div>
    );
   },
7

Set the text prop type to any and do this:

<MyComponent text={
    <React.Fragment>
        <div> Hello, World!</div>
    </React.Fragment>
    } 
/>

Example

4

You can do it in 2 ways that I am aware of.

1- <MyComponent text={<p>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</p>} />

And then do this

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
   render () {
     return (<div>{this.props.text}</div>)
   }
}

Or second approach do it like this

2- <MyComponent><p>This is <strong>not</strong> working.</p><MyComponent/>

And then do this

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
   render () {
     return (<div>{this.props.children}</div>)
   }
}
1
  • 1
    I added a variable let vhtml = "<p>Test</p>" and used it on the prop like this text={vhtml} and it still rendered in plain text for some reason.
    – Si8
    Jul 10, 2019 at 0:53
4

You can successfully utilize React fragments for this task. Depending on the React version you use, you can use short syntax: <> or the full tag: <React.Fragment>. Works especially well if you don't want to wrap entire string within HTML tags.

<MyComponent text={<>Hello World. <u>Don't be so ruthless</u>.</>} />
3

Parser from html-react-parser is a good solution. You just have to

  • install it with npm or yarn
  • import Parser from 'html-react-parser';
  • call it with :

    <MyComponent text=Parser("This is <strong>not</strong> working.") />
    

    and it works well.

2

@matagus answer is fine for me, Hope below snippet is helped those who wish to use a variable inside.

const myVar = 'not';
<MyComponent text={["This is ", <strong>{`${myVar}`}</strong>,  "working."]} />
2

Do like this:

const MyText = () => {
     return (
          <>
               This is <strong>Now</strong> working.
          </>
     )
}

then pass it as a props as:

<MyComponent Text={MyText} />

now you can use it in your component:

const MyComponent = ({Text}) => {
     return (
          <>
               // your code
               {<Text />}
               // some more code
          </>
     )
 }
1

In my project I had to pass dynamic html snippet from variable and render it inside component. So i did the following.

defaultSelection : {
    innerHtml: {__html: '<strong>some text</strong>'}
}

defaultSelection object is passed to component from .js file

<HtmlSnippet innerHtml={defaultSelection.innerHtml} />

HtmlSnippet component

var HtmlSnippet = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <span dangerouslySetInnerHTML={this.props.innerHtml}></span>
    );
  }
});

Plunkr example

react doc for dangerouslySetInnerHTML

1

You could also use a function on the component to pass along jsx to through props. like:

 var MyComponent = React.createClass({

   render: function() {
    return (
      <OtherComponent
        body={this.body}
      />
    );
   },

   body() {
     return(
       <p>This is <strong>now</strong> working.<p>
     );
   }

});

var OtherComponent = React.createClass({

  propTypes: {
    body: React.PropTypes.func
  },

  render: function() {
     return (
        <section>
          {this.props.body()}
        </section>
     );
  },

});
1

Yes, you can it by using mix array with strings and JSX elements. reference

<MyComponent text={["This is ", <strong>not</strong>,  "working."]} />
1

Adding to the answer: If you intend to parse and you are already in JSX but have an object with nested properties, a very elegant way is to use parentheses in order to force JSX parsing:

const TestPage = () => (
  <Fragment>
    <MyComponent property={
    {
      html: (
        <p>This is a <a href='#'>test</a> text!</p>
      )
    }}>
    </MyComponent>
  </Fragment>
);
1

This question has already a lot of answers, but I had was doing something wrong related to this and I think is worth sharing:

I had something like this:

export default function Features() {
  return (
    <Section message={<p>This is <strong>working</strong>.</p>} />
  }
}

but the massage was longer than that, so I tried using something like this:

const message = () => <p>This longer message is <strong>not</strong> working.</p>;

export default function Features() {
  return (
    <Section message={message} />
  }
}

It took me a while to realize that I was missing the () in the function call.

Not working

<Section message={message} />

Working

<Section message={message()} />

maybe this helps you, as it did to me!

1

We can do the same thing in such a way.

const Child = () => {
  return (
     write your whole HTML here.
  )
}

now you want to send this HTML inside another component which name is Parent component.

Calling :-

<Parent child={<child/>} >
</Parent> 

Use Of Child:-

 const Parent = (props) => {
   const { child } = props; 
   return (
       {child}
    )
}

this work perfect for me.

0

Here is a solution that doesn't use the dangerouslySetInnerHTML which is dangerous as the name says.

import { IntlProvider, FormattedMessage } from "react-intl";

<FormattedMessage
          id="app.greeting"
          description="Bold text example"
          defaultMessage="Look here, I can include HTML tags in plain string and render them as HTML: <b>Bold</b>, <i>Italics</i> and <a>links too</a>."
          values={{
            b: (chunks) => <b>{chunks}</b>,
            i: (chunks) => <i>{chunks}</i>,
            a: (chunks) => (
              <a class="external_link" target="_blank" href="https://jiga.dev/">
                {chunks}
              </a>
            )
          }}
        />

This should be rendered as:

react jiga.dev

Full example in https://jiga.dev/react-render-string-with-html-tags-from-props/

-9

Have appended the html in componentDidMount using jQuery append. This should solve the problem.

 var MyComponent = React.createClass({
    render: function() {

        return (
           <div>

           </div>
        );
    },
    componentDidMount() {
        $(ReactDOM.findDOMNode(this)).append(this.props.text);
    }
});
1
  • 5
    This is down voted because you shouldn't be using jquery's direct DOM manipulation combined with react's indirect DOM manipulation, as it can lead to browser thrashing.
    – Allison
    Nov 4, 2016 at 14:19

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