-18

Why is the output of the following C code 0.000000?

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(float *);

int main()
{
    int i = 10, *p = &i;
    foo(&i);
}

void foo(float *p)
{
    printf("%f\n", *p);
}

Please explain your answer.

1
  • You got your types mixed up...
    – Matheus208
    Oct 28 '15 at 10:09
4

You are making printf() interpret the bits of an integer as if they were the bits of a float. This is undefined behavior.

What result did you expect?

4
  • Why there was no type casting. I expected 10.000000 Oct 28 '15 at 10:09
  • 3
    @user2653926 When would that happen? There is no way for foo() to know that you lied. You should be getting compiler warnings however, since you're calling foo() with an argument of the wrong type.
    – unwind
    Oct 28 '15 at 10:10
  • Sorry still dont get it. Oct 28 '15 at 10:14
  • To start with you are sending an int into a function that takes a float. What compiler warnings/errors are you getting? Always try to hear what the compiler is saying about your code. So change the type of i to float and you are on your way to a better place...
    – mattiash
    Oct 28 '15 at 10:28
1

First of all, when your code looks like it does in your question the line *p = &i; doesn't do anything at all.

Next - you are passing a pointer to your int variable to a function that expects float. Like @unwind mentioned in the comments there is no way for foo() to know that you lied. Typecasting is different thing from what you seem to consider it.

#include <stdio.h>
void foo(float *);
int main()
{
    int i = 10; //try this and see it fails, 
                //then switch this line with float i = 10; and try again
    foo(&i);
}
void foo(float *p)
{
    printf("%f\n", *p);
}

EDIT> If you insist on having a typecast somewhere...

#include <stdio.h>
void foo(float *);
int main()
{
    int i = 10;
    float p = (float)i;
    foo(&p);
    return 0;
}
void foo(float *p)
{
    printf("%f\n", *p);
}
0

Variadic functions in C and C++ take variable number of arguments while they don't know type of entry arguments.

In printf function, the first argument is a string which hopefully indicates the types of following arguments by format specifiers.

In your code, your specifier indicates that the following argument is an float (%f), but you've passed an integer. Since all this type checking is happening in run-time and compiler knows nothing about it, there is no automatic casting.

Your code invokes undefined behavior.

1
  • The actual parameter has static type float. Its runtime behavior is defined because of a strict aliasing rule violation. But the problem is not with the variadic function call. One could write float x = *p; and the problem would still be there.
    – Ben Voigt
    Apr 30 '18 at 6:39
0

Try this one:

#include <stdio.h>
void foo(int *);
int main()
{
    int i = 10;
    foo(&i);
}
void foo(int *p)
{
    printf("%f\n",(float) *p);
}

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