7

Coming from Java, I am used to doing this:

void setColor(String color) {
    this.color = color;
}

However, I recently switched to C++, and I see a lot of this instead:

void setColor(string c) {
    color = c;
}

Why not this? Is this not recommended?

void setColor(string color) {
    this->color = color;
}
  • 4
    Its less typing. You don't have to use this in c++ but there is nothing stopping you from using it. – NathanOliver Oct 28 '15 at 16:11
  • 1
    @NathanOliver what he said. But also you don't need to use this if they aren't the same name. – 3kings Oct 28 '15 at 16:12
  • 2
    I see, I do like to use this for clarity reasons obviously. As long there is no penalty for this. – user1529412 Oct 28 '15 at 16:13
  • 1
    There's no penalty per se, but it's not the usual coding style C++ programmers use. Typically parameter names are usually made to be different in C++ from member names and local variables. – GreatAndPowerfulOz Oct 28 '15 at 16:15
  • 2
    @user1529412: There is a massive penalty in readability, and your coworkers keying your car for making such a mess of their code base. In general, asking about the "correct" syntax for writing getters/setters is a bit like asking whether it's better to cut off your leg with a chainsaw or an ax. Better to not cut off your leg (or write a getter/setter) at all. – Jerry Coffin Oct 28 '15 at 16:17
13

It's the exact same thing. In Java if you had named your parameter c instead of color, you would not have any shadowing and you could easily write

void setColor(String c) {
    color = c;
}

The this in Java (or C++ for that matter) is only needed to specify exactly which color you are referring to: the member variable or the local variable.

1

There is no need to use this, because there is no conflict between local and member variable and no fields are hidden. Generally you don't want this conflict to happen at all by not having same variable as an constructor parameter and also as local variable (despite so many books teach you exactly this). I find this is much more smooth(and also more readable even if you don't have background from particular language):

private String localColor;
void setColor(String color) {
localColor = color;
}

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