6

I just stumbled into an issue with std::vector when adding new elements to it.

It seems when you try to add more elements to it, and it needs to allocate more space, it does so by copying last element all elements it currently holds. This seems to assume that any element in the vector is fully valid, and as such a copy will always succeed.

In our case, this is not necessarily true. Currently we might have some left over elements in the vector, because we chose not to remove them yet, which are valid objects, but their data doesn't guarantee valid behavior. The objects have guards, but I never considered adding guards to a copy constructor as I assumed we would never be copying an invalid object (which vector forces) :

CopiedClass::CopiedClass(const CopiedClass& other)
    : member(other.member)
{
    member->DoSomething();
}

It just so happened that "member" is nulled when we are done with the original object and leave it lying about in the vector, so when std::vector tries to copy it, it crashes.

Is it possible to prevent std::vector from copying that element? Or do we have to guard against possible invalid objects being copied? Ideally we'd like to keep assuming that only valid objects are created, but that seems to imply we immediately clean them from the vector, rather than waiting and doing it at some later stage.

11
  • 3
    So you have an object that during its lifetime can become uncopyable? Oct 28, 2015 at 17:45
  • std::vector always takes copies on push_back(), and no you can't prevent this behavior. Oct 28, 2015 at 17:45
  • @πάνταῥεῖ I don' think that part is the issue. I believe the problem is the copies when the vector goes through a reallocation. Oct 28, 2015 at 17:47
  • Initialize the vector via vector_member(filter_garbage(other.vector_member)) in affected copy constructors (and do similar in assignment operators (maybe copy/swap))
    – user2249683
    Oct 28, 2015 at 17:50
  • 5
    "It seems when you try to add more elements to it, and it needs to allocate more space, it does so by copying the last element it currently holds". Such behaviour would go right against both the standard and the common sense. Can you demonstrate it? Oct 28, 2015 at 17:52

3 Answers 3

7

It's actually a design flaw in your CopiedClass that needs to be fixed.

std::vector behaves as expected and documented.

From the little code you show

member->DoSomething();

this indicates you are going to take a shallow copy of a pointer to what ever.

in our case, this is not necessarily true. Currently we might have some left over elements in the vector, because we chose not to remove them yet, which are valid objects, but their data doesn't guarantee valid behavior.


It just so happened that "member" is nulled when we are done with the original object and leave it lying about in the vector, so when std::vector tries to copy it, it crashes.

As your copy constructor doesn't handle that situation correctly regarding following the Rule of Three your design of CopiedClass is wrong.

You should either care to create a deep copy of your member, or use a smart pointer (or a plain instance member), rather than a raw pointer.

The smart pointers should take care of the management for these members correctly.

Also for the code snippet from above, you should test against nullpointer before blindly dereferencing and calling DoSomething().

Is it possible to prevent std::vector from copying that element?

As you're asking for it's possible, but requires you never change the size of the vector, and provide a move constructor and assignment operator for CopiedClass.

Otherwise, std::vector explicitly requires copyable types (at least for certain operations):

T must meet the requirements of CopyAssignable and CopyConstructible.

It's your responsibility to meet these requirements correctly.


... it does so by copying the last element it currently holds.

Also note: In a situation the vector needs to be resized, all of the existing elements will be copied, not only the last one as you premise.

5
  • 7
    Since C++11, the requirement of copyable types only applies to certain operations. Otherwise, std::vector<std::unique_ptr<X>> would not be possible. Oct 28, 2015 at 18:14
  • 1
    @ChristianHackl Anyways it's not a question of the vector's behavior, but a faulty design of the class contained here. Oct 28, 2015 at 18:24
  • 1
    Absolutely. It should be refactored. (By the way, I did not downvote.) Oct 28, 2015 at 18:25
  • @ChristianHackl I also don't get the downvote (never suspected it was you beloved neighbor). People don't seem to get what I'm writing here. Oct 28, 2015 at 18:27
  • Very comprehensive answer. You're absolutely right, it is a design flaw and a bad assumption to make.. I was definitely more curious and confused as to why a previous element was being copied, which of course is the vector allocating a larger memory block and moving it's current data over... Back to data structures basics much... Thanks guys
    – Zepee
    Oct 29, 2015 at 9:49
2

If you know the vector's maximum size in advance, then a workaround for this issue would be calling reserve with that maximum size. When the vector's capacity is big enough, no reallocations occur and no copies of existing elements need to be made.

But that's really just a workaround. You should redesign your class such that copying cannot suddenly become an invalid operation, either by making copying safe or by disallowing it and perhaps replace it with moving, like std::unique_ptr. If you make the validity of copying dependent on some run-time status, then you don't even need a std::vector to get into trouble. A simple CopiedClass get(); will be a potential error.

2

It seems when you try to add more elements to it, and it needs to allocate more space, it does so by copying the last element it currently holds. This seems to assume that any element in the vector is fully valid, and as such a copy will always succeed.

Both sentences are not really correct. When vector runs out of space it, yes, performs reallocation, but of all the elements and these are copied to the new location or possibly moved. When you push_back or emplace_back, and reallocation is needed, the element will generally by copied: if an exception is thrown during that, it will be treated as if you had never added the element. If vector detects a noexcept user-defined move constructor ( MoveInsertable concept), elements are moved; if this constructor though is not noexcept, and an exception is thrown, the result is unspecified.

The objects have guards, but I never considered adding guards to a copy constructor as I assumed we would never be copying an invalid object (which vector forces) :

vector copies its value_type: it does not care whether what it contains is valid or invalid. You should take care of that in your copy control methods, whose scope is exactly to define how the object is passed around.


CopiedClass::CopiedClass(const CopiedClass& other)
    : member(other.member)
{
    member->DoSomething();
}

The obvious solution would be to check if member is valid and act thereby.

if (member.internalData.isValid())
    member->DoSomething()
// acknowledge this.member's data is invalid

We don't know how member is represented, but Boost.Optional is what you may be looking for.

Is it possible to prevent std::vector from copying that element?

Reallocation is something vector is expected to commit so, no, you can't. reserv-ing space could avoid that, but maintaining code to handle that would not really be painless. Rather, prefer a container like std::forward_list/std::list.

Other solutions:

  • Hold a unique_ptr<decltype(member)>, but pointers are not often a real solution
  • Define move semantics for your object, as described in other answers.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.