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In our product, we are using angularjs 1.3 and we are having many different UI components with different styles like border, background-color, font size, font color, spacing, padding etc...

However, as part of productization, I would like all such different combination of UI components to be defined as standard directives so that it will be more easy, straight forward and component library based UI model for all pages across application.

As a solution for this I defined a generic custom directive as <tabloid which is a straight representation of <div. Also this directive will have optional dependent child as panel-header, panel-body, panel-footer and also a standard attribute as class. This class will represent the tabloid flavor from our standard template.less file to define its style and behavior in some cases. The advantage of this model is that we will have good css and html element coupled together in a very coding friendly manner and easy for any developer to pick and use these elements for any future developments thus making it as a standard library for our application. We decided to use <tabloid directive and avoid <div as a whole as an empty <tabloid is a straight representation of <div to avoid any confusion for developers to pick b/w these two elements. Since the inner contents of <tablod directive are optional, there are arguments that <div is more sensible than custom directive as it reduces angularjs overhead which we agreed to some extent.

Now the question is if I use custom directives everywhere in application instead of <div will it be a significant performance hit. We are any way pre-rendering all templates using "text/ng-template" on the landing page thus avoiding any run time rending of a custom directive which already helping us to improve lot of performance.

A simple example is given below for better understanding of this requirement...

HTML

<div class="summary">
   <div class="panel-heading green-heading">
      <label>{{MyTitle}}</label>
      <img class="pull-right" src="settings.ico" />
   </div>
   <div class="panel-body">
         <span class="green-font">{{MyVal}}</span>
   </div>
</div>

<div class="summary">
   <div class="panel-heading blue-heading">
      <label>{{MyTitle}}</label>
      <img class="pull-right" src="settings.ico" />
   </div>
   <div class="panel-body">
         <span class="blue-font">{{MyVal}}</span>
   </div>
</div>

Planning to implement it in one of these two different styles whichever is better. My personal choice is with 2nd model.

1st model: Angular JS Custom Directive UI Component Style

<tabloid class="green" tabloid-title="{{MyTitle}}">{{MyVal}}</tabloid>
<tabloid class="blue" tabloid-title="{{MyTitle}}">{{MyVal}}</tabloid>

Directive Declaration

 directive('tabloid', function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'E',
            replace: true,
            transclude: true,
            myTitle: '@',
            myVal: '@',
            template: '<div ng-transclude class="tabloid">
                          <div class="panel-heading">{{myTitle}}</div> 
                          <div class="panel-body">{{myVal}}</div>
                     </div>'
        }
    });

2nd model... (very generic directive will work with combination of other directives)

HTML with AngularJs

 <tabloid class="green" tabloid-title="{{MyTitle}}">
    <panel-heading>{{MyTitle}}</panel-heading>
    <panel-body>{{MyVal}}</panel-body>
 </tabloid>
 <tabloid class="blue" tabloid-title="{{MyTitle}}">
    <panel-heading>{{MyTitle}}</panel-heading>
    <panel-body>{{MyVal}}</panel-body>
 </tabloid>

Directive Declaration

 directive('tabloid', function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'E',
            replace: true,
            transclude: true,
            myTitle: '@',
            myVal: '@',
            template: '<div ng-transclude class="tabloid" />'
        }
    });
  • Show the directive. I think how much JavaScript/logic you have in the actual directive will determine how much of an impact it would be, cause in the end it will probably render the same (or close to it). – Hanlet Escaño Oct 28 '15 at 19:36
  • I just make changes to my questions to give it much clarity. Please have a look at it and any help would be greatly appreciated. – Sridhar Gudimela Oct 28 '15 at 20:02
  • I really don't see what you are trying to accomplish by using a custom directive in place of divs. What exactly do you mean by "...so that it will be more easy, straight forward and component library based UI model for all pages across application." ? – Fridjon Gudjohnsen Oct 28 '15 at 20:54
  • above one is an illustrative. A more complex directive may have many elements with combination of <div><span><label><h1> etc and we have css built using these elements in a specific hierarchal order. So to have a similar component reflect else where, we no need to have these huge combination of elements. Also, there are many similar elements with a slight difference in CSS like border, color, spacing change which can be easily addressed with a CSS class at directive (Directive prototype class) level instead of changing in individual html elements without impact on existing stuff. – Sridhar Gudimela Oct 28 '15 at 21:01
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It will certainly have some effect on performance, how much depends really on what code/functionality you put inside your directives. The overhead by the templating is not really anything very significant.

Ben Nadel had a blogpost on this a while ago when he dug a bit into this.

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