36

I can't find the answer anywhere.

I would like to calculate new variable of data frame which is based on mean of rows.

For example:

data <- data.frame(id=c(101,102,103), a=c(1,2,3), b=c(2,2,2), c=c(3,3,3))

I want to use mutate to make variable d which is mean of a,b and c. And I would like to be able to make that by selecting columns in way d=mean(a,b,c), and also I need to use range of variables (like in dplyr) d=mean(a:c).

And of course

mutate(data, c=mean(a,b)) 

or

mutate(data, c=rowMeans(a,b)) 

doesn't work.

Can you give me some tip?

Regards

4
  • 1
    rowMeans is for a matrix, not a vector of args. I'd suggest data %>% mutate(c = Reduce("+",.)/length(.))
    – Frank
    Oct 28 '15 at 23:43
  • Thanks - it works, but how to select only specific rows (for ex. p1 to p32)? And how to deal with NAs? Oct 29 '15 at 17:15
  • Could you modify your question to illustrate what you mean?
    – Frank
    Oct 29 '15 at 17:16
  • Ok, I did it. Is it clear now? ;-) Oct 29 '15 at 17:47
40

You're looking for

data %>% 
    rowwise() %>% 
    mutate(c=mean(c(a,b)))

#      id     a     b     c
#   (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)
# 1   101     1     2   1.5
# 2   102     2     2   2.0
# 3   103     3     2   2.5

or

library(purrr)
data %>% 
    rowwise() %>% 
    mutate(c=lift_vd(mean)(a,b))
1
  • 6
    Ah. Not bad at all. Unfortunately the documentation of rowwise is terrible (“rowwise does something under some situations. Here’s an undescriptive example for a single special case that cannot be generalised.”) so I end up never using it. :-( Oct 30 '15 at 15:22
17

dplyr is badly suited to operate on this kind of data because it assumes tidy data format and — for the problem in question — your data is untidy.

You can of course tidy it first:

tidy_data = tidyr::gather(data, name, value, -id)

Which looks like this:

   id name value
1 101    a     1
2 102    a     2
3 103    a     3
4 101    b     2
5 102    b     2
6 103    b     2
    …

And then:

tidy_data %>% group_by(id) %>% summarize(mean = mean(value))
    name  mean
  (fctr) (dbl)
1      a     2
2      b     2
3      c     3

Of course this discards the original data. You could use mutate instead of summarize to avoid this. Finally, you can then un-tidy your data again:

tidy_data %>%
    group_by(id) %>%
    mutate(mean = mean(value)) %>%
    tidyr::spread(name, value)
     id     mean     a     b     c
  (dbl)    (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)
1   101 2.000000     1     2     3
2   102 2.333333     2     2     3
3   103 2.666667     3     2     3

Alternatively, you could summarise and then merge the result with the original table:

tidy_data %>%
    group_by(id) %>%
    summarize(mean = mean(value)) %>%
    inner_join(data, by = 'id')

The result is the same in either case. I conceptually prefer the second variant.

3
  • Incidentally: reshaping the data can be inefficient for very big tables but I use equivalent code with a data.frame that has several million rows, and it still works fine. Oct 29 '15 at 18:23
  • I forgot about that for dplyr data should be tidy - but in fact, for my purposes that kind of transformation seems to be very oblique way... But now i get it! :) Oct 29 '15 at 20:43
  • It would seem to me that OP's issue has more to do with mean.default's awkward signature (dots after defaults) interacting with dplyr's argument mapping than dplyr's inability to work with 'untidy' data. Oct 30 '15 at 15:10
9

I think the answer suggesting using data.frame or slicing on . is the best, but could be made simpler and more dplyr-ish like so:

data %>% mutate(c = rowMeans(select(., a,b)))

Or if you want to avoid ., with the penalty of having two inputs to your pipeline:

data %>% mutate(c = rowMeans(select(data, a,b)))
1
  • Yes. Use of select does increase the flexibility for choosing variables to be summed.
    – JWilliman
    May 28 '19 at 21:58
7

And yet another couple of ways, useful if you have the numeric positions or vector names of the columns to be summarised:

data %>% mutate(d = rowMeans(.[, 2:4]))

or

data %>% mutate(d = rowMeans(.[, c("a","b","c")]))
2
  • pretty similar to my answer, but I like how you don't need to use data.frame() that kind of always bothered me. thanks. Mar 27 '18 at 20:16
  • 1
    this is the best solution, but made simpler by using select on the piped-in data frame. Have added an answer.
    – bjw
    May 28 '19 at 15:13
5

Another simple possibility with few code is:

data %>%
    mutate(c= rowMeans(data.frame(a,b)))

 #     id a b   c
 #  1 101 1 2 1.5
 #  2 102 2 2 2.0
 #  3 103 3 2 2.5

As rowMeans needs something like a matrix or a data.frame, you can use data.frame(var1, var2, ...) instead of c(var1, var2, ...). If you have NAs in your data you'll need to tell R what to do, for example to remove them: rowMeans(data.frame(a,b), na.rm=TRUE)

4

I think this is the dplyr-ish way. First, I'd create a function:

my_rowmeans = function(...) Reduce(`+`, list(...))/length(list(...))

Then, it can be used inside mutate:

data %>% mutate(rms = my_rowmeans(a, b))

#    id a b c rms
# 1 101 1 2 3 1.5
# 2 102 2 2 3 2.0
# 3 103 3 2 3 2.5

# or

data %>% mutate(rms = my_rowmeans(a, b, c))

#    id a b c      rms
# 1 101 1 2 3 2.000000
# 2 102 2 2 3 2.333333
# 3 103 3 2 3 2.666667

To deal with the possibility of NAs, the function must be uglified:

my_rowmeans = function(..., na.rm=TRUE){
  x = 
    if (na.rm) lapply(list(...), function(x) replace(x, is.na(x), as(0, class(x)))) 
    else       list(...)

  d = Reduce(function(x,y) x+!is.na(y), list(...), init=0)

  Reduce(`+`, x)/d
} 

# alternately...

my_rowmeans2 = function(..., na.rm=TRUE) rowMeans(cbind(...), na.rm=na.rm)

# new example

data$b[2] <- NA  
data %>% mutate(rms = my_rowmeans(a,b,na.rm=FALSE))

   id a  b c rms
1 101 1  2 3 1.5
2 102 2 NA 3  NA
3 103 3  2 3 2.5

data %>% mutate(rms = my_rowmeans(a,b))

   id a  b c rms
1 101 1  2 3 1.5
2 102 2 NA 3 2.0
3 103 3  2 3 2.5

The downside to the my_rowmeans2 is that it coerces to a matrix. I'm not certain that this will always be slower than the Reduce approach, though.

2
  • my_rowmeans = function(...) Reduce(+, list(...))/length(list(...)) this is the very close solution of my problem. But how to deal with NAs? na.rm parameter would be very useful ;-) Oct 29 '15 at 20:43
  • @TomaszWojtas Updated. It would be better if your initial post reflected this as well (rather than extending the question in comments).
    – Frank
    Oct 29 '15 at 21:02
0

If you'd like to use a pivot_longer()-style solution:

data%>%
pivot_longer(cols=-id)%>%
group_by(id)%>%
mutate(mean=mean(value))%>%
pivot_wider(names_from=name, values_from=value)

Note that this requires the tidyr package.

This is my preference for the fact that I only need to type the name of my ID column, and don't have to worry about column indices or names otherwise. Good for a quick copy-and-point-this-at-different-data solution, though the same can be said of other answers here. Also good for cases where you might have more than one column with categorical information and haven't created a single unique identifier column.

For what it's worth, I found that this solution is very easily modified to ignore NA values with simple addition of na.rm=TRUE in the mean calculation.

For example:

data <- data.frame(id=c(101,102,103), a=c(NA,2,3), b=c(2,2,2), c=c(3,3,3))


data%>%
pivot_longer(cols=-id)%>%
group_by(id)%>%
mutate(mean=mean(value,na.rm=TRUE))%>%
pivot_wider(names_from = name, values_from=value)

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