100

I found this code in Python for removing emojis but it is not working. Can you help with other codes or fix to this?

I have observed all my emjois start with \xf but when I try to search for str.startswith("\xf") I get invalid character error.

emoji_pattern = r'/[x{1F601}-x{1F64F}]/u'
re.sub(emoji_pattern, '', word)

Here's the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 52, in <module>
    re.sub(emoji_pattern,'',word)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/re.py", line 151, in sub
    return _compile(pattern, flags).sub(repl, string, count)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/re.py", line 244, in _compile
    raise error, v # invalid expression
sre_constants.error: bad character range

Each of the items in a list can be a word ['This', 'dog', '\xf0\x9f\x98\x82', 'https://t.co/5N86jYipOI']

UPDATE: I used this other code:

emoji_pattern=re.compile(ur" " " [\U0001F600-\U0001F64F] # emoticons \
                                 |\
                                 [\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF] # symbols & pictographs\
                                 |\
                                 [\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF] # transport & map symbols\
                                 |\
                                 [\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF] # flags (iOS)\
                          " " ", re.VERBOSE)

emoji_pattern.sub('', word)

But this still doesn't remove the emojis and shows them! Any clue why is that? enter image description here

4

28 Answers 28

85

On Python 2, you have to use u'' literal to create a Unicode string. Also, you should pass re.UNICODE flag and convert your input data to Unicode (e.g., text = data.decode('utf-8')):

#!/usr/bin/env python
import re

text = u'This dog \U0001f602'
print(text) # with emoji

emoji_pattern = re.compile("["
        u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
        u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
        u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
        u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
                           "]+", flags=re.UNICODE)
print(emoji_pattern.sub(r'', text)) # no emoji

Output

This dog ๐Ÿ˜‚
This dog 

Note: emoji_pattern matches only some emoji (not all). See Which Characters are Emoji.

17
  • so if you have the flag you don't need to decode you data using `.decode('utf-8') ?
    – Mona Jalal
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 16:58
  • 1
    @MonaJalal: no, .decode() converts a bytestring into Unicode string. You should prefer Unicode strings while working with text (type(text) == unicode on Python 2)
    – jfs
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 17:03
  • 1
    @MonaJalal: Linux uses a wide python2 build by default and therefore the code in the answer should work as is there. You might need the try/except only on a narrow python2 build e.g., on Windows (You could update to Python 3, to avoid thinking about narrow/wide builds -- the code in the answer works on Python 3 too).
    – jfs
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 19:55
  • 1
    @MonaJalal: edit your question and put the necessary info there. Try to limit your questions to a single issue so that the question might be useful to somebody else too (you had "sre_constants.error: bad character range" issue that is explained in Bryan Oakley's answer, I've shown how to properly write emoji_pattern without `ur" " " ...\` (I haven't try to find valid emoji ranges). Unfortunately, neither directly answer the question in the title of your question. Also, don't encode to bytes
    – jfs
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 20:31
  • 3
    It didnt work on เน€เธšเธญเธฃเนŒ10!! เธชเน‰เธกเธชเธงเธข 01เนเธเธ”เธ‚เธญเธ‡08 เธžเธฃเน‰เธญเธกเธชเนˆเธ‡!๐Ÿ’‹๐Ÿ’‹ string which is \xF0\x9F\x92\x8B\xF0\x9F
    – Umair Ayub
    Commented Oct 10, 2017 at 10:10
77

Complete Version of remove Emojis
โœ ๐ŸŒท ๐Ÿ“Œ ๐Ÿ‘ˆ๐Ÿป ๐Ÿ–ฅ

import re
def remove_emojis(data):
    emoj = re.compile("["
        u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
        u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
        u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
        u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
        u"\U00002500-\U00002BEF"  # chinese char
        u"\U00002702-\U000027B0"
        u"\U000024C2-\U0001F251"
        u"\U0001f926-\U0001f937"
        u"\U00010000-\U0010ffff"
        u"\u2640-\u2642" 
        u"\u2600-\u2B55"
        u"\u200d"
        u"\u23cf"
        u"\u23e9"
        u"\u231a"
        u"\ufe0f"  # dingbats
        u"\u3030"
                      "]+", re.UNICODE)
    return re.sub(emoj, '', data)
4
  • It works well, thank you. But for me it didn't remove this icon: โช.
    – Abdel
    Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 10:55
  • 1
    this removes some arabic letters. Thus messing up Arabic text. Please advise
    – R.A
    Commented Dec 5, 2021 at 12:30
  • 4
    this works, but: u"\U00002702-\U000027B0" is duplicated, u"\U000024C2-\U0001F251" already includes ranges u"\U00002500-\U00002BEF" and u"\U00002702-\U000027B0". Also u"\U00010000-\U0010ffff" already includes everything with 5+ digits before it and u"\u2600-\u2B55" already includes u"\u2640-\u2642". So this answer could be shorter and more concise.
    – lateus
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 20:28
  • Tested on my data and at first attempt got a missing ALARM CLOCK (โฐ) emoji, had to add it to a list :) The best way to cover all of them would be to parse a list of them from unicode site (link is given in a first comment under the question post) Commented Feb 9 at 9:53
59

I am updating my answer to this by @jfs because my previous answer failed to account for other Unicode standards such as Latin, Greek etc. StackOverFlow doesn't allow me to delete my previous answer hence I am updating it to match the most acceptable answer to the question.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import re

text = u'This is a smiley face \U0001f602'
print(text) # with emoji

def deEmojify(text):
    regrex_pattern = re.compile(pattern = "["
        u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
        u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
        u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
        u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
                           "]+", flags = re.UNICODE)
    return regrex_pattern.sub(r'',text)

print(deEmojify(text))

This was my previous answer, do not use this.

def deEmojify(inputString):
    return inputString.encode('ascii', 'ignore').decode('ascii')
10
  • 38
    This strips all non-ASCII characters, and does so very inefficiently (why not just inputString.encode('ascii', 'ignore').decode('ascii') and be done with it in one single step?) . There is more to the larger Unicode standard than just Emoji, you can't just strip Latin, Greek, Hangul, Myanmar, Tibetan, Egyptian or any of the other Unicode-supported scripts just to remove the Emoji.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 11:10
  • this is the only solution that worked for text = 'This dog \xe2\x80\x9d \xe2\x80\x9c'
    – Mona Jalal
    Commented Mar 25, 2019 at 0:15
  • 2
    @MonaJalal: That string isn't actually Unicode (it's the raw bytes representing the UTF-8 encoding of actual Unicode). Even decoded, it has no emoji at all (those bytes decode to right and left "smart quotes"). If this solves your problem, your problem wasn't what your question was asking about; this removes all non-ASCII characters (including simple stuff like accented e, é), not just emoji. Commented Sep 13, 2019 at 15:56
  • This removes other language characters apart from emoji. Is there any other way to remove only the emojis? @MartijnPieters Commented Nov 27, 2019 at 13:45
  • 2
    @IsharaMalaviarachchi: I wrote an answer to a different question that removes emoji: Remove Emoji's from multilingual Unicode text
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Nov 27, 2019 at 16:55
26

If you are not keen on using regex, the best solution could be using the emoji python package.

Here is a simple function to return emoji free text (thanks to this SO answer):

import emoji
def give_emoji_free_text(text):
    allchars = [str for str in text.decode('utf-8')]
    emoji_list = [c for c in allchars if c in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI]
    clean_text = ' '.join([str for str in text.decode('utf-8').split() if not any(i in str for i in emoji_list)])
    return clean_text

If you are dealing with strings containing emojis, this is straightforward

>> s1 = "Hi ๐Ÿค” How is your ๐Ÿ™ˆ and ๐Ÿ˜Œ. Have a nice weekend ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ‘ญ๐Ÿ‘™"
>> print s1
Hi ๐Ÿค” How is your ๐Ÿ™ˆ and ๐Ÿ˜Œ. Have a nice weekend ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ‘ญ๐Ÿ‘™
>> print give_emoji_free_text(s1)
Hi How is your and Have a nice weekend

If you are dealing with unicode (as in the exmaple by @jfs), just encode it with utf-8.

>> s2 = u'This dog \U0001f602'
>> print s2
This dog ๐Ÿ˜‚
>> print give_emoji_free_text(s2.encode('utf8'))
This dog

Edits

Based on the comment, it should be as easy as:

def give_emoji_free_text(text):
    return emoji.get_emoji_regexp().sub(r'', text.decode('utf8'))
4
  • 12
    The project does one better: it includes a regex generator function. Use emoji.get_emoji_regexp().sub(r'', text.decode('utf8')) and be done with it. Do not just iterate over all the characters one by one, that's.. very inefficient.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 11:25
  • This doesn't work with โ™• โ™”NAFSET โ™•. May be those characters arenot emojies.
    – heyxh
    Commented Jan 8, 2020 at 12:03
  • 11
    The code in Edits will throw an error if the text is already decoded. In that case, the return statement should be return emoji.get_emoji_regexp().sub(r'', text) where we drop the unnecessary .decode('utf8')
    – Pedram
    Commented Mar 14, 2020 at 6:52
  • 5
    emoji package has internal function dedicated to emoji replacement - emoji.replace_emoji(str, replace='')
    – Ernest
    Commented Jun 1, 2022 at 13:10
19

Complete version to remove emojies:

import re
def remove_emoji(string):
    emoji_pattern = re.compile("["
                           u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
                           u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
                           u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
                           u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
                           u"\U00002702-\U000027B0"
                           u"\U000024C2-\U0001F251"
                           "]+", flags=re.UNICODE)
    return emoji_pattern.sub(r'', string)
4
  • can you explain more specifically, what additional you give (by adding comments like other parts)
    – malioboro
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 6:52
  • 1
    It's not a perfect solution, because the Unicode 9.0 emoji are not included in the pattern. Nor are those for Unicode 10.0 or 11.0. You'll just have to keep updating the pattern.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 11:06
  • @MartijnPieters see my answer below! Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 19:16
  • @KevinTydlacka: that's not a good approach either. See my a recent answer of mine that relies on a 3rd-party library to provide updated regexes.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 24, 2018 at 19:15
18

If you're using the example from the accepted answer and still getting "bad character range" errors, then you're probably using a narrow build (see this answer for more details). A reformatted version of the regex that seems to work is:

emoji_pattern = re.compile(
    u"(\ud83d[\ude00-\ude4f])|"  # emoticons
    u"(\ud83c[\udf00-\uffff])|"  # symbols & pictographs (1 of 2)
    u"(\ud83d[\u0000-\uddff])|"  # symbols & pictographs (2 of 2)
    u"(\ud83d[\ude80-\udeff])|"  # transport & map symbols
    u"(\ud83c[\udde0-\uddff])"  # flags (iOS)
    "+", flags=re.UNICODE)
16

Accepted answer, and others worked for me for a bit, but I ultimately decided to strip all characters outside of the Basic Multilingual Plane. This excludes future additions to other Unicode planes (where emoji's and such live), which means I don't have to update my code every time new Unicode characters are added :).

In Python 2.7 convert to unicode if your text is not already, and then use the negative regex below (subs anything not in regex, which is all characters from BMP except for surrogates, which are used to create 2 byte Supplementary Multilingual Plane characters).

NON_BMP_RE = re.compile(u"[^\U00000000-\U0000d7ff\U0000e000-\U0000ffff]", flags=re.UNICODE)
NON_BMP_RE.sub(u'', unicode(text, 'utf-8'))
2
  • Thank you for sharing. The ranges above do not filter characters like this one: ๔ฐ€ I don't even know what this is because I cannot see it in my browser, hope it is not something insulting :D Commented May 15, 2017 at 19:01
  • This is the most robust answer. For Python 3, the last line becomes cleaned_text = NON_BMP_RE.sub(u"", text).
    – pir
    Commented Jun 4, 2021 at 17:59
9

I tried to collect the complete list of unicodes. I use it to extract emojis from tweets and it work very well for me.

# Emojis pattern
emoji_pattern = re.compile("["
                u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
                u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
                u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
                u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
                u"\U00002702-\U000027B0"
                u"\U000024C2-\U0001F251"
                u"\U0001f926-\U0001f937"
                u'\U00010000-\U0010ffff'
                u"\u200d"
                u"\u2640-\u2642"
                u"\u2600-\u2B55"
                u"\u23cf"
                u"\u23e9"
                u"\u231a"
                u"\u3030"
                u"\ufe0f"
    "]+", flags=re.UNICODE)
4
  • doesn't work for text = u'This dog \xe2\x80\x9d \xe2\x80\x9c'
    – Mona Jalal
    Commented Mar 25, 2019 at 0:10
  • >>> print "\xe2\x80\x9d".decode("utf-8") โ€ >>> print "\xe2\x80\x9c".decode("utf-8") โ€œ And you're asking about removing emojis ? or removing special characters ?
    – Chiheb.K
    Commented Mar 25, 2019 at 14:41
  • Doesn't remove โฐ Commented Sep 9, 2019 at 12:18
  • I used this to delete all emojis from Twitter Stream. What is your case ? input, output ?
    – Chiheb.K
    Commented Sep 10, 2019 at 13:09
9

I was able to get rid of the emoji in the following ways.

emoji install https://pypi.org/project/emoji/

$ pip3 install emoji
import emoji

def remove_emoji(string):
    return emoji.get_emoji_regexp().sub(u'', string)

emojis = '(๏ฝ€ใƒ˜ยด) ๐Ÿค—โญ•๐Ÿค“๐Ÿค”๐Ÿค˜๐Ÿฆโญ๐Ÿ†—๐Ÿ†–๐Ÿˆฒ๐Ÿค๐Ÿค—๐Ÿค–๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿ†™โฉ'
print(remove_emoji(emojis))

## Output result
(๏ฝ€ใƒ˜ยด)
3
  • 1
    Got an error: AttributeError: module 'emoji' has no attribute 'get_emoji_regexp' Commented Jul 25, 2022 at 18:16
  • 1
    @FoundABetterName use emoji == 1.7.3. 'get_emoji_regexp' is deprecated in recent versions
    – ZooPanda
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 15:53
  • use emoji.replace_emoji(text, replace='') instead.
    – Raptor
    Commented Oct 17, 2023 at 1:55
8

The best solution to this will be to use an external library emoji . This library is continuosly updated with latest emojis and thus can be used to find them in any text. Unlike the ascii decode method which remove all unicode characters this method keeps them and only remove emojis.

  1. First install emoji library if you don't have: pip install emoji
  2. Next import it in your file/project : import emoji
  3. Now to remove all emojis use the statement: emoji.get_emoji_regexp().sub("", msg) where msg is the text to be edited

That's all you need.

8

Use the Demoji package, https://pypi.org/project/demoji/

import demoji

text="๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿค‘"
emoji_less_text = demoji.replace(text, "")
6

I found two libs to replace emojis:

Emoji: https://pypi.org/project/emoji/

import emoji
string = "๐Ÿฆ‘ ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Ÿ”ฅ"
emoji.replace_emoji(string, replace="!")

Demoji: https://pypi.org/project/demoji/

import demoji
string = "๐Ÿฆ‘ ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Ÿ”ฅ"
demoji.replace(string, repl="!")

Both of them have other useful methods.

4

this is my solution. This solution removes additional man and woman emoji which cant be renered by python ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚ and ๐Ÿคฆโ€โ™€

emoji_pattern = re.compile("["
                       u"\U0001F600-\U0001F64F"  # emoticons
                       u"\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF"  # symbols & pictographs
                       u"\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF"  # transport & map symbols
                       u"\U0001F1E0-\U0001F1FF"  # flags (iOS)
                       u"\U00002702-\U000027B0"
                       u"\U000024C2-\U0001F251"
                       u"\U0001f926-\U0001f937"
                       u"\u200d"
                       u"\u2640-\u2642" 
                       "]+", flags=re.UNICODE)
4

This is the easiest code for remove all emoji.

import emoji

def remove_emojis(text: str) -> str:
    return ''.join(c for c in text if c not in emoji.UNICODE_EMOJI)

pip install emoji

3
  • how can i remove :) , ;) like emojis
    – Sunil Garg
    Commented Feb 25, 2021 at 12:05
  • This is only support for this kind of emojis โ—๐Ÿ•™๐Ÿ™†๐Ÿ‘Œ๐Ÿ˜จ.
    – Nori
    Commented Feb 26, 2021 at 5:42
  • @SunilGarg Those aren't technically emojis. They are emoticons.
    – Asclepius
    Commented Mar 1, 2021 at 5:10
3

Because [...] means any one of a set of characters, and because two characters in a group separated by a dash means a range of characters (often, "a-z" or "0-9"), your pattern says "a slash, followed by any characters in the group containing x, {, 1, F, 6, 0, 1, the range } through x, {, 1, F, 6, 4, f or }" followed by a slash and the letter u". That range in the middle is what re is calling the bad character range.

1
  • can you look at the update and tell why the code is wrong?
    – Mona Jalal
    Commented Oct 29, 2015 at 2:54
3

Here's a Python 3 script that uses the emoji library's get_emoji_regexp() - as suggested by kingmakerking and Martijn Pieters in their answer/comment.

It reads text from a file and writes the emoji-free text to another file.

import emoji
import re


def strip_emoji(text):

    print(emoji.emoji_count(text))

    new_text = re.sub(emoji.get_emoji_regexp(), r"", text)

    return new_text


with open("my_file.md", "r") as file:
    old_text = file.read()

no_emoji_text = strip_emoji(old_text)

with open("file.md", "w+") as new_file:
    new_file.write(no_emoji_text)
2

Converting the string into another character set like this might help:

text.encode('latin-1', 'ignore').decode('latin-1')

Kind regards.

1
  • Simple is better than complex
    – wrivas
    Commented Jan 24, 2023 at 14:24
2

I know this may not be directly related to question asked but It is helpful in solving the parent problem that is removing emojis from text. There is a module named demoji in python which does this task very accurately and removes almost all types of emojis. It also updates regularly to provide up to date emoji removal support. For removing an emoji demoji.replace(text, '') is used.

1

Tried all the answers, unfortunately, they didn't remove the new hugging face emoji ๐Ÿค— or the clinking glasses emoji ๐Ÿฅ‚or ๐Ÿค”, ๐Ÿค˜and a lot more.

Ended up with a list of all possible emoji, taken from the python emoji package on github, and I had to create a gist because there's a 30k character limit on stackoverflow answers and it's over 70k characters.

3
  • When i tried your list i got this error TypeError: compile() got multiple values for argument 'flags' on python3 Commented Jun 22, 2018 at 7:38
  • @bro-grammer just remove the extra "," and it will work. Commented Aug 21, 2018 at 17:33
  • try this result = re.sub('[(\U0001F600-\U0001F92F|\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF|\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF|\U0001F190-\U0001F1FF|\U00002702-\U000027B0|\U0001F926-\U0001FA9F|\u200d|\u2640-\u2642|\u2600-\u2B55|\u23cf|\u23e9|\u231a|\ufe0f)]+','', text_with_emojis) This removes almost all the emojis Commented Apr 24, 2020 at 10:57
1

I simply removed all the special characters using regex and this worked for me.

sent_0 = re.sub('[^A-Za-z0-9]+', ' ', sent_0)
0
1

If you are asking for:

  1. python2.7
  2. Chinese, EN letters, numbers
def filter_str(desstr):
    # ่ฟ‡ๆปค้™คไธญ่‹ฑๆ–‡ๅŠๆ•ฐๅญ—ไปฅๅค–็š„ๅ…ถไป–ๅญ—็ฌฆ
    return ''.join(re.findall(u'[\u4e00-\u9fa5a-zA-Z0-9]', desstr))
0

For me the following worked in python 3.8 for substituting emojis:

import re
result = re.sub('[(\U0001F600-\U0001F92F|\U0001F300-\U0001F5FF|\U0001F680-\U0001F6FF|\U0001F190-\U0001F1FF|\U00002702-\U000027B0|\U0001F926-\U0001FA9F|\u200d|\u2640-\u2642|\u2600-\u2B55|\u23cf|\u23e9|\u231a|\ufe0f)]+','','A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿคฏ')

Its a much simplified version of the answers given here. I tested this code for i18n support, tested with english,russian,chinese and japanese. only emojis were removed.

This is not an exhaustive list , may have missed some emojis, but works for most of the common emojis

0

For those still using Python 2.7, this regex might help:

(?:[\u2700-\u27bf]|(?:\ud83c[\udde6-\uddff]){2}|[\ud800-\udbff][\udc00-\udfff]|[\u0023-\u0039]\ufe0f?\u20e3|\u3299|\u3297|\u303d|\u3030|\u24c2|\ud83c[\udd70-\udd71]|\ud83c[\udd7e-\udd7f]|\ud83c\udd8e|\ud83c[\udd91-\udd9a]|\ud83c[\udde6-\uddff]|[\ud83c\ude01-\ude02]|\ud83c\ude1a|\ud83c\ude2f|[\ud83c\ude32-\ude3a]|[\ud83c\ude50-\ude51]|\u203c|\u2049|[\u25aa-\u25ab]|\u25b6|\u25c0|[\u25fb-\u25fe]|\u00a9|\u00ae|\u2122|\u2139|\ud83c\udc04|[\u2600-\u26FF]|\u2b05|\u2b06|\u2b07|\u2b1b|\u2b1c|\u2b50|\u2b55|\u231a|\u231b|\u2328|\u23cf|[\u23e9-\u23f3]|[\u23f8-\u23fa]|\ud83c\udccf|\u2934|\u2935|[\u2190-\u21ff])

So to use it in your code, it will somewhat look like this:

emoji_pattern = re.compile(
    u"(?:[\u2700-\u27bf]|(?:\ud83c[\udde6-\uddff]){2}|[\ud800-\udbff][\udc00-\udfff]|[\u0023-\u0039]\ufe0f?\u20e3|\u3299|\u3297|\u303d|\u3030|\u24c2|\ud83c[\udd70-\udd71]|\ud83c[\udd7e-\udd7f]|\ud83c\udd8e|\ud83c[\udd91-\udd9a]|\ud83c[\udde6-\uddff]|[\ud83c\ude01-\ude02]|\ud83c\ude1a|\ud83c\ude2f|[\ud83c\ude32-\ude3a]|[\ud83c\ude50-\ude51]|\u203c|\u2049|[\u25aa-\u25ab]|\u25b6|\u25c0|[\u25fb-\u25fe]|\u00a9|\u00ae|\u2122|\u2139|\ud83c\udc04|[\u2600-\u26FF]|\u2b05|\u2b06|\u2b07|\u2b1b|\u2b1c|\u2b50|\u2b55|\u231a|\u231b|\u2328|\u23cf|[\u23e9-\u23f3]|[\u23f8-\u23fa]|\ud83c\udccf|\u2934|\u2935|[\u2190-\u21ff])"
    "+", flags=re.UNICODE)

Why is this still needed when we actually don't use Python 2.7 that much anymore these days? Some systems/Python implementations still use Python 2.7, like Python UDFs in Amazon Redshift.

0

The code works for me, but before we need to install emoji package

pip install emoji==2.7.0

Code

import emoji


def delete_emojis(text):
    return emoji.replace_emoji(text)


import pytest

@pytest.mark.parametrize(
    "text, expected",
    [
        # ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ’จ๐Ÿฅ„๐Ÿšก
        ("Hello, World!", "Hello, World!"),
        ("Hello, World!๐Ÿ˜€", "Hello, World!"),
        ("Hello, World!๐Ÿšก๐Ÿฅ„", "Hello, World!"),
        ("Hello, World!๐Ÿ‘)", "Hello, World!)"),
        ("๐Ÿ•ถH๐Ÿฆดello, W๐ŸŽฒorld๐Ÿ˜‡!", "Hello, World!"),
    ],
)
def test_delete_emojis(text, expected):
    assert delete_emojis(text) == expected
1
  • emoji.replace_emoji() may be too aggressive. It will remove emoji even when rendered as text (using VS-15). It also removes any characters that default to text presentation but could be rendered as emoji. For instance copyright sign, etc, are usually rendered as text, but could be rendered as emoji using VS-16, but this code will strip out copyright, trademark, registered trademark signs when rendered as text. Many other text characters may be stripped as well.
    – Andj
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 5:59
0

This is the regex for Unicode V15 set of all emoji.

It is a ternary trie regex.
Constructed with regexformat. This regex has to be reconstructed
with each new Unicode version release every year.
Unfortunately, there is no other way to find the complete set of emoji.

Find and replace with nothing.

(?:[0-9#*]๏ธโƒฃ|[โ˜โœŠ-โœ๐ŸŽ…๐Ÿ‚๐Ÿ‡๐Ÿ‘‚๐Ÿ‘ƒ๐Ÿ‘†-๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘ซ-๐Ÿ‘ญ๐Ÿ‘ฒ๐Ÿ‘ด-๐Ÿ‘ถ๐Ÿ‘ธ๐Ÿ‘ผ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿ’…๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’‘๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿ•ด๐Ÿ•บ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ––๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ›€๐Ÿ›Œ๐ŸคŒ๐Ÿค๐Ÿค˜-๐ŸคŸ๐Ÿคฐ-๐Ÿคด๐Ÿคถ๐Ÿฅท๐Ÿฆต๐Ÿฆถ๐Ÿฆป๐Ÿง’๐Ÿง“๐Ÿง•๐Ÿซƒ-๐Ÿซ…๐Ÿซฐ๐Ÿซฒ-๐Ÿซธ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]?|โ›“(?:๏ธโ€๐Ÿ’ฅ)?|[โ›น๐Ÿ‹๐ŸŒ๐Ÿ•ต](?:๏ธโ€[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ|[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ](?:โ€[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ)?)?|โค(?:๏ธโ€[๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿฉน])?|๐Ÿ‡ฆ[๐Ÿ‡จ-๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ถ-๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ง[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฉ-๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฑ-๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ถ-๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡จ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ซ-๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฐ-๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ-๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ฉ[๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ช[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ท-๐Ÿ‡บ]|๐Ÿ‡ซ[๐Ÿ‡ฎ-๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ท]|๐Ÿ‡ฌ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฉ-๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ-๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ต-๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡พ]|๐Ÿ‡ญ[๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡บ]|๐Ÿ‡ฎ[๐Ÿ‡จ-๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฑ-๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ถ-๐Ÿ‡น]|๐Ÿ‡ฏ[๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ต]|๐Ÿ‡ฐ[๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ-๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ฑ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ-๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ท-๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡พ]|๐Ÿ‡ฒ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ-๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฐ-๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ณ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ช-๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฒ|๐Ÿ‡ต[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ช-๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฐ-๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ท-๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡พ]|๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ฆ|๐Ÿ‡ท[๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ผ]|๐Ÿ‡ธ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ-๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ-๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ท-๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฝ-๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡น[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ซ-๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฏ-๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡บ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ฟ]|๐Ÿ‡ป[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡บ]|๐Ÿ‡ผ[๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ธ]|๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ฐ|๐Ÿ‡พ[๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡น]|๐Ÿ‡ฟ[๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ผ]|๐Ÿ„(?:โ€๐ŸŸซ)?|๐Ÿ‹(?:โ€๐ŸŸฉ)?|[๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿšถ๐ŸงŽ](?:โ€(?:[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ(?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|โžก๏ธ)|[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ](?:โ€(?:[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ(?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|โžก๏ธ))?)?|[๐Ÿ„๐ŸŠ๐Ÿ‘ฎ๐Ÿ‘ฐ๐Ÿ‘ฑ๐Ÿ‘ณ๐Ÿ‘ท๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’‚๐Ÿ’†๐Ÿ’‡๐Ÿ™…-๐Ÿ™‡๐Ÿ™‹๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™Ž๐Ÿšฃ๐Ÿšด๐Ÿšต๐Ÿคฆ๐Ÿคต๐Ÿคท-๐Ÿคน๐Ÿคฝ๐Ÿคพ๐Ÿฆธ๐Ÿฆน๐Ÿง๐Ÿง๐Ÿง”๐Ÿง–-๐Ÿง](?:โ€[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ|[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ](?:โ€[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ)?)?|๐Ÿณ(?:๏ธโ€(?:โšง๏ธ|๐ŸŒˆ))?|๐Ÿด(?:โ€โ˜ ๏ธ|๓ ง(?:๓ ข(?:๓ ฅ๓ ฎ๓ ง|๓ ณ๓ ฃ๓ ด)๓ ฟ)?)?|๐Ÿˆ(?:โ€โฌ›)?|๐Ÿ•(?:โ€๐Ÿฆบ)?|๐Ÿฆ(?:โ€[โฌ›๐Ÿ”ฅ])?|๐Ÿป(?:โ€โ„๏ธ)?|๐Ÿ‘(?:๏ธโ€๐Ÿ—จ๏ธ)?|๐Ÿ‘จ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ|๐Ÿ‘ฆ(?:โ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ)?|๐Ÿ‘ง(?:โ€[๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง])?|[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ]โ€(?:๐Ÿ‘ฆ(?:โ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ)?|๐Ÿ‘ง(?:โ€[๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง])?)|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ])|๐Ÿป(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿผ-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿผ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป๐Ÿฝ-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿฝ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป๐Ÿผ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿพ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿฟ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿ‘จ[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿพ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?)?|๐Ÿ‘ฉ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ]|๐Ÿ’‹โ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ])|๐Ÿ‘ฆ(?:โ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ)?|๐Ÿ‘ง(?:โ€[๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง])?|๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€(?:๐Ÿ‘ฆ(?:โ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ)?|๐Ÿ‘ง(?:โ€[๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง])?)|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ])|๐Ÿป(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿผ-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿผ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป๐Ÿฝ-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿฝ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป๐Ÿผ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿพ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿฟ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€[๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ][๐Ÿป-๐Ÿพ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?)?|[๐Ÿ‘ฏ๐Ÿคผ๐Ÿงž๐ŸงŸ](?:โ€[โ™€โ™‚]๏ธ)?|๐Ÿ˜ฎ(?:โ€๐Ÿ’จ)?|๐Ÿ˜ต(?:โ€๐Ÿ’ซ)?|๐Ÿ˜ถ(?:โ€๐ŸŒซ๏ธ)?|๐Ÿ™‚(?:โ€[โ†”โ†•]๏ธ)?|๐Ÿง‘(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿง‘|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ„๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]|(?:๐Ÿง‘โ€)?๐Ÿง’(?:โ€๐Ÿง’)?)|๐Ÿป(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿง‘[๐Ÿผ-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿง‘[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ„๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿผ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿง‘[๐Ÿป๐Ÿฝ-๐Ÿฟ]|๐Ÿคโ€๐Ÿง‘[๐Ÿป-๐Ÿฟ]|[๐Ÿฆฏ๐Ÿฆผ๐Ÿฆฝ](?:โ€โžก๏ธ)?|[๐ŸŒพ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿผ๐ŸŽ„๐ŸŽ“๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽจ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿš’๐Ÿฆฐ-๐Ÿฆณ]))?|๐Ÿฝ(?:โ€(?:[โš•โš–โœˆ]๏ธ|โค๏ธโ€(?:๐Ÿ’‹โ€)?๐Ÿง‘[๐Ÿป๐Ÿผ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ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Python example : https://regex101.com/r/xJhw78/1

-1

This does more than filtering out just emojis. It removes unicode but tries to do that in a gentle way and replace it with relevant ASCII characters if possible. It can be a blessing in the future if you don't have for example a dozen of various unicode apostrophes and unicode quotation marks in your text (usually coming from Apple handhelds) but only the regular ASCII apostrophe and quotation.

unicodedata.normalize("NFKD", sentence).encode("ascii", "ignore")

This is robust, I use it with some more guards:

import unicodedata

def neutralize_unicode(value):
    """
    Taking care of special characters as gently as possible

    Args:
        value (string): input string, can contain unicode characters

    Returns:
        :obj:`string` where the unicode characters are replaced with standard
        ASCII counterparts (for example en-dash and em-dash with regular dash,
        apostrophe and quotation variations with the standard ones) or taken
        out if there's no substitute.
    """
    if not value or not isinstance(value, basestring):
        return value

    if isinstance(value, str):
        return value

    return unicodedata.normalize("NFKD", value).encode("ascii", "ignore")

This is python 2.

-1

I also wanted to remove emojis from a text file. But most of the solutions gave ranges of Unicode to remove emojis, it is not a very appropriate way to do. The remove_emoji method is an in-built method, provided by the clean-text library in Python. We can use it to clean data that has emojis in it. We need to install it from pip in order to use it in our programs:

pip install clean-text

We can use the following syntax to use it:

#import clean function
from cleantext import clean

#provide string with emojis
text = "Hello world!๐Ÿ˜€๐Ÿคฃ"

#print text after removing the emojis from it
print(clean(text, no_emoji=True))

Output:

Hello world!
1
  • Doesn't work when the text includes Persian.
    – j4hangir
    Commented Apr 14, 2023 at 20:33
-1

Use clean-text library:

  1. pip install clean-text
  2. text = clean(text, no_emoji=True)

Quick test:

text = "This sample text contains laughing emojis ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜ƒ ๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿคฉ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜‚ ๐Ÿคฃ"
text = clean(text, no_emoji=True)
print(text)

This library also has some other great methods to process text.

Source: https://www.educative.io/answers/how-to-remove-emoji-from-the-text-in-python.

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