3

How do I pass a decorator's function into a job?

I have a decorator that would run a job using the function.

@job
def queueFunction(passedFunction, *args, **kwargs):
    # Do some stuff
    passedFunction(*args, **kwargs)

def myDecorator(async=True):
    def wrapper(function):
        def wrappedFunc(*args, **kwargs):
            data = DEFAULT_DATA
            if async:
                queueFunction.delay(function, *args, **kwargs)
            else:
                data = queueFunction(function, *args, **kwargs)
            return data
        return wrappedFunc
    return wrapper

I get an error when trying to use it.

Can't pickle <function Model.passedFunction at 0x7f410ad4a048>: it's not the same object as modelInstance.models.Model.passedFunction

Using Python 3.4

  • Warning: you can't use async as a variable name in Python 3.7 or newer. You may want to replace that with async_ or another name. – Martijn Pieters Jul 8 at 15:08
  • 1
    @Kareem, why is current answer not accepted? – Tarun Lalwani Jul 12 at 7:35
6
+25

What happens is that you are passing in the original function (or method) to the queueFunction.delay() function, but that's not the same function that it's qualified name says it is.

In order to run functions in a worker, Python RQ uses the pickle module to serialise both the function and its arguments. But functions (and classes) are serialised as importable names, and when deserialising the pickle module simply imports the recorded name. But it does first check that that will result in the right object. So when pickling, the qualified name is tested to double-check it'll produce the exact same object.

If we use pickle.loads as a sample function, then what roughly happens is this:

>>> import pickle
>>> import sys
>>> sample_function = pickle.loads
>>> module_name = sample_function.__module__
>>> function_name = sample_function.__qualname__
>>> recorded_name = f"{module_name}.{function_name}"
>>> recorded_name
'_pickle.loads'
>>> parent, obj = sys.modules[module_name], None
>>> for name in function_name.split("."):  # traverse a dotted path of names
...     obj = getattr(parent, name)
...
>>> obj is sample_function
True

Note that pickle.loads is really _pickle.loads; that doesn't matter all that much, but what does matter is that _pickle can be accessed and it has an object that can be found by using the qualified name, and it is the same object still. This will work even for methods on classes (modulename.ClassName.method_name).

But when you decorate a function, you are potentially replacing that function object:

>>> def decorator(f):
...     def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
...         return f, f(*args, **kwargs)
...     return wrapper
...
>>> @decorator
... def foo(): pass
...
>>> foo.__qualname__
'decorator.<locals>.wrapper'
>>> foo()[0].__qualname__  # original function
'foo'

Note that the decorator result has a very different qualified name from the original! Pickle won't be able to map that back to either the decorator result or to the original function.

You are passing in the original, undecorated function to queueFunction.delay(), and it's qualified name will not match that of the wrappedFunc() function you replaced it with; when pickle tries to import the fully qualified name found on that function object, it'll find the wrappedFunc object and that's not the same object.

There are several ways around this, but the easiest is to store the original function as an attribute on the wrapper, and rename it's qualified name to match. This makes the original function available

You'll have to use he @functools.wraps() utility decorator here to copy various attributes from the original, decorated function over to your wrapper function. This includes the original name.

Here is a version that alters the original function qualified name:

from functools import wraps

def myDecorator(async_=True):
    def wrapper(function):
        @wraps(function)
        def wrappedFunc(*args, **kwargs):
            data = DEFAULT_DATA
            if async:
                queueFunction.delay(function, *args, **kwargs)
            else:
                data = queueFunction(function, *args, **kwargs)
            return data

        # make the original available to the pickle module as "<name>.original"
        wrappedFunc.original = function
        wrappedFunc.original.__qualname__ += ".original"

        return wrappedFunc
    return wrapper

The @wraps(function) decorator makes sure that wrappedFunc.__qualname__ is set to that of function, so if function was named foo, so now is the wrappedFunc function object. The wrappedFunc.original.__qualname__ += ".original" statement then sets the qualified name of wrappedFunc.original to foo.original, and that's exactly where pickle can find it again!

Note: I renamed async to async_ to make the above code work on Python 3.7 and above; as of Python 3.7 async is a reserved keyword.

I also see that you are making the decision to run something synchronous or asynchronous at decoration time. In that case I'd re-write it to not check the aync_ boolean flag each time you call the function. Just return different wrappers:

from functools import wraps

def myDecorator(async_=True):
    def decorator(function):
        if async_:
            @wraps(function)
            def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
                queueFunction.delay(wrappedFunc.original, *args, **kwargs)
                return DEFAULT_DATA

            # make the original available to the pickle module as "<name>.original"
            wrapper.original = function
            wrapper.original.__qualname__ += ".original"
        else:
            @wraps(function)
            def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
                return queueFunction(function, *args, **kwargs)

        return wrapper
    return decorator

I also renamed the various inner functions; myDecorator is a decorator factory that returns the actual decorator, and the decorator returns the wrapper.

Either way, the result is that now the .original object can be pickled:

>>> import pickle
>>> @myDecorator(True)
... def foo(): pass
...
>>> foo.original
<function foo.original at 0x10195dd90>
>>> pickle.dumps(foo.original, pickle.HIGHEST_PROTOCOL)
b'\x80\x04\x95\x1d\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x8c\x08__main__\x94\x8c\x0cfoo.original\x94\x93\x94.'

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