5

How can I replace the spaces in a JSON object's keys dynamically? For example, if I have the following object:

[{
    "FIRST NAME": "Philip",
    "LAST NAME": "Rivers",
    "NUMBER": "17",
    "GPA": "1.0",
    "OLD_FACTOR": "8",
    "NICENESS": "1"
}, {
    "FIRST NAME": "Peyton",
    "LAST NAME": "Manning",
    "NUMBER": "18",
    "GPA": "4.0",
    "OLD_FACTOR": "5000",
    "NICENESS": "5000"
}]

I want to be able to dynamically rename "FIRST NAME" and "LAST NAME" to "FIRST_NAME" and "LAST_NAME" respectively. Based on research so far, I have this function:

function replaceSpaces(data) {
    debugger;
    for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        var obj = data[i];
        for (var key in obj) {
            var replacedKey = key.split(' ').join('_');
            data[i][obj] = replacedKey;
        }
    }

    return data;
}

The "data" parameter being passed in is an object that has already had JSON.parse ran on it prior to entering this function.

My issue with this code is that it's looping through the keys just fine, and assigning the proper replaced string to "replacedKey", but it's not assigning that to the original data object.

3
  • 2
    data[i][replacedKey] = data[i][key];
    – Pointy
    Oct 30, 2015 at 14:56
  • Are you actually asking about JSON? That is, are you interested in transforming the text content of a JSON document/string, or are you merely interested in working with JavaScript objects?
    – apsillers
    Oct 30, 2015 at 14:58
  • I'm interested in modifying the key name of the JavaScript object (if I'm understanding you correctly). I've already parsed it into the object, so I'm not interested in changing the string prior to that. Oct 30, 2015 at 15:00

3 Answers 3

6

Here's complete code using forEach.

The steps are same as Quentin has stated in his answer

  1. Copy the value
  2. Remove the key-value from the object
  3. Add new item with new value in the object

var arr = [{
  "FIRST NAME": "Philip",
  "LAST NAME": "Rivers",
  "NUMBER": "17",
  "GPA": "1.0",
  "OLD_FACTOR": "8",
  "NICENESS": "1"
}, {
  "FIRST NAME": "Peyton",
  "LAST NAME": "Manning",
  "NUMBER": "18",
  "GPA": "4.0",
  "OLD_FACTOR": "5000",
  "NICENESS": "5000"
}];


// Iterate over array
arr.forEach(function(e, i) {
  // Iterate over the keys of object
  Object.keys(e).forEach(function(key) {
    
    // Copy the value
    var val = e[key],
      newKey = key.replace(/\s+/g, '_');
    
    // Remove key-value from object
    delete arr[i][key];

    // Add value with new key
    arr[i][newKey] = val;
  });
});

console.log(arr);
document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = JSON.stringify(arr, 0, 4);
<pre id="result"></pre>


Strictly if the JSON is get in the form of String from server:

Replace the spaces by _ from the keys.

JSON.parse(jsonString.replace(/"([\w\s]+)":/g, function (m) {
    return m.replace(/\s+/g, '_');
}));
9
  • Ok I think I understand you guys now. One sec and I'll try to fit it into mine. (I was trying to avoid the .forEach function due to performance concerns). Oct 30, 2015 at 15:09
  • @xboxremote Avoiding forEach? You should avoid for...in for better performance
    – Tushar
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:10
  • 1
    My colleague mentioned he had found some articles saying .forEach performs slower. However, in researching myself, it does look like that might be false due to confusion in testing. At any rate, this worked perfectly (and I ended up using the .forEach). Thank you! Oct 30, 2015 at 15:16
  • 1
    @DownVoter, at-least consider adding comment when down-voting a working and accepted answer. I'd be happy to improve answer.
    – Tushar
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:46
  • 1
    @Tushar, strictly speaking about objects - it will be much faster to create new object with new keys rather then adding new key and deleting old one from original object.
    – webduvet
    Oct 30, 2015 at 16:05
4

You need to:

  • Copy the value
  • Delete the old property
  • Modify the correct object. (data[i][obj] will convert obj to a string and try to use it as a property name).

Such:

    for (var original_property in obj) {
        var new_property = original_property.split(' ').join('_');
        obj[new_property] = obj[original_property];
        delete obj[original_property]
    }
1
  • Slight error here: key.split should be original_property.split.
    – Danmoreng
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:17
0

since it is JSON it is expected to come as string you could do it with a help of Regex.

var processedJson = yourJson.replace(/( +)(?=[(\w* *]*":)/g, "_");
var yourObj = JSON.parse(processedJson);

/( +)(?=[(\w* *]*":)/g will find all ocurances of within " ... ": which is a key on every JSON object.

5
  • Can you use .replace on an Object?
    – Tushar
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:44
  • Right, I think Tushar is right here. I could do this earlier in my logic before I parse the JSON, but it wouldn't make sense in the context of my app. At this point in the app, I don't believe this would work. Oct 30, 2015 at 15:46
  • regex works only with strings. but as I said JSON comes as string. or you however can use JSON.stringify() on every object in JS anytime you want
    – webduvet
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:47
  • @Tushar when your JSON comes as string (from ajax) using Regex is a valid method, I don't see any reason why would I avoid it.
    – webduvet
    Oct 30, 2015 at 15:52
  • I might have been unclear in my original question, but I was looking to avoid any manipulation of the string equivalent, because I'm already past that in my app's logic. This function was designed to take an object, and not a string. Stringifying and parsing again would be unnecessary if I already have an object I can loop through. I definitely understand your proposal though. Oct 30, 2015 at 16:23

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