50

In the ngOnInit method of a component the @Input values will have been bound so you can check those properties on the component, but there doesn't seem to be a way to check @Output event bindings. I want to be able to know if the @Output was wired up on the component or not.

(using Angular and TypeScript)

import {Component, Output, EventEmitter} from '@angular/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'sample',
    template: `<p>a sample</p>`
})
export class SampleComponent {
    @Output() cancel = new EventEmitter();
    
    ngOnInit() {
        // would like to check and see if cancel was used
        // on the element <sample (cancel)="doSomething()"></sample> 
        // or not <sample></sample>
    }
}
0

5 Answers 5

77

Same approach as user1448982 but without using the ObservableWrapper that is meant to be platform code that is not exposed for use via the api.

(Using Angular 2 RC1 and TypeScript)
Note: This only started working from 2.0.0-beta.16 and greater

import {Component, Output, EventEmitter} from '@angular/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'sample',
    template: `<p>a sample</p>`
})
export class SampleComponent {
    @Output() cancel = new EventEmitter();
    private isCancelUsed = false;

    ngOnInit() {
        this.isCancelUsed = this.cancel.observers.length > 0;
    }
}

Plunker

The ObservableWrapper.hasSubscribers method does this line internally, so you can just do the same thing here.

When using TypeScript you will get a transpile time error if Angular ever ends up changing the EventEmitter from a Subject (which is part Observable, thus the .observers property).

Update (03 / 2022)

The observers attribute is deprecated since rxjs v7. Instead of checking the length of the observers array, you can now use a boolean that indicates if the subject is in use.

// Old approach
this.isCancelUsed = this.cancel.observers.length > 0;

// New approach
this.isCancelUsed = this.cancel.observed;
5

Angular 12 removed the EventEmitter#observables field so the accepted answer is no longer valid.

An alternative solution for now would be to cast to a Subject instead:

get hasOutputEventSubscriber() {
    return (this.cancel as Subject).observers;
}

Note that this property is also deprecated and will be removed in rxjs v8. A future-proof solution would be to write a custom wrapper class for the EventEmitter.

1
  • 5
    you can use this.cancel.observed, which is a getter property which wraps the now deprecated method Jun 11, 2021 at 15:16
3

The following code should work:

import {Component, Output, EventEmitter, OnInit} from 'angular2/core';
import {ObservableWrapper} from 'angular2/src/facade/async';

@Component({
    selector: 'sample',
    template: `<p>a sample</p>`
})
export class SampleComponent implements OnInit {
    @Output() cancel: EventEmitter<any> = new EventEmitter();

    private isCancelUsed: boolean;

    ngOnInit(): void {
        this.isCancelUsed = ObservableWrapper.hasSubscribers(this.cancel);
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Don't rely on this though. The Angular team doesn't make any guarantees that EventEmitter will continue to extends Observable May 10, 2016 at 11:20
  • However now we are in 2021 and it appears very highly unlikely that this will ever be changed. Observables are everywhere in Angular and are here to stay. They totally make sense as output event emitters. I think if they really wanted us to completely avoid using observable features they'd have exposed an Observable instance yes, but as a subsetted interface that only allows for emit/subscribe. Sep 17, 2021 at 13:28
1

Here is a future proof example that does not rely on any internals of Angular or rxjs. This is a simple wrapper around EventEmitter that exposes a subscriberCount property that is automatically incremented/decremented as subscribers are added/removed.

class WatchedEventEmitter extends EventEmitter<any> {
    private _subscriberCount = 0;
    get subscriberCount(): number {
        return this._subscriberCount;
    }

    subscribe(next?: (value: any) => void, error?: (error: any) => void, complete?: () => void): Subscription {
        ++this._subscriberCount;
        return super.subscribe(next, error, complete);
    }

    unsubscribe() {
        --this._subscriberCount;
        super.unsubscribe();
    }
}

Usage example:

@Component({template: `
    {{click.subscriberCount|json}}
    <span *ngIf="cancel.subscriberCount">
        <button mat-icon-button (click)="cancel.emit()">Click Me</button>
    </span>
    
    <span *ngIf="!cancel.subscriberCount">No Subscribers</span>
`})
export class SomeComponent {
    @Output() cancel = new WatchedEventEmitter();
}
0

as of now current version Angular 13 to check if is there any observer/callback is provided you can use this.cancel.observed which will return boolean

import {Component, Output, EventEmitter} from '@angular/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'sample',
    template: `<p>a sample</p>`
})
export class SampleComponent {
    @Output() cancel = new EventEmitter();
    private isCancelUsed = false;

    ngOnInit() {
        this.isCancelUsed = this.cancel.observed;
    }
}

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