I am trying to convert the IP address range into the CIDR notation in Java. Can someone provide an example of how this can be achieved?

I used the SubnetUtils for converting the CIDR to IP address range, but I can't figure out the other way round.

For example: (using http://ip2cidr.com/)

Input 1: 5.10.64.0
Input 2: 5.10.127.255
Result: 5.10.64.0/18

Thanks, Dhaval

  • I think you'll find the info you're looking for in this post: networkengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/3697/… – Jared Dykstra Oct 30 '15 at 19:57
  • The real way to do it is address AND mask to get the subnet address, and subnet + NOT mask to get the broadcast address. Both an IP address and a mask are 32-bit unsigned integers, and you need to use those to do IP address manipulation.. – Ron Maupin Oct 30 '15 at 19:58
  • 1
    If you are always sure that you'll have the first (0) address and the last (broadcast address), then you can get an unambiguous answer for this. But if you just give it an arbitrary range, you will more than one answer. – RealSkeptic Oct 30 '15 at 20:23
  • Just to clarify - The list I have (github.com/client9/ipcat/blob/master/datacenters.csv) is the datacenter start and end ranges. So, I'll not always have the first (0) address and the last(broadcast address) – Dhaval Kotecha Oct 30 '15 at 20:30
  • Doing it properly by ANDing an address and mask will always give you the correct subnet,, and adding the subnet to the inverse of the mask will always give you the broadcast address for IPv4 (IPv6 doesn't have broadcast and can use every address in the subnet, including the subnet and last address). This method works despite which power of two the subnet starts on. This is how IP addresses work, and it works for IPv6, too, except that you need 128-bit unsigned integers for the IPv6 address and mask instead of the 32-bit unsigned integers for IPv4. – Ron Maupin Oct 31 '15 at 0:28
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class RangeToCidr {
    public static List<String> range2cidrlist( String startIp, String endIp ) {
        // check parameters
        if (startIp == null || startIp.length() < 8 ||
            endIp == null || endIp.length() < 8) return null;
        long start = ipToLong(startIp);
        long end = ipToLong(endIp);
        // check parameters
        if (start > end) return null;

        List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
        while (start <= end) {
            // identify the location of first 1's from lower bit to higher bit of start IP
            // e.g. 00000001.00000001.00000001.01101100, return 4 (100)
            long locOfFirstOne = start & (-start);
            int maxMask = 32 - (int) (Math.log(locOfFirstOne) / Math.log(2));

            // calculate how many IP addresses between the start and end
            // e.g. between 1.1.1.111 and 1.1.1.120, there are 10 IP address
            // 3 bits to represent 8 IPs, from 1.1.1.112 to 1.1.1.119 (119 - 112 + 1 = 8)
            double curRange = Math.log(end - start + 1) / Math.log(2);
            int maxDiff = 32 - (int) Math.floor(curRange);

            // why max?
            // if the maxDiff is larger than maxMask
            // which means the numbers of IPs from start to end is smaller than mask range
            // so we can't use as many as bits we want to mask the start IP to avoid exceed the end IP
            // Otherwise, if maxDiff is smaller than maxMask, which means number of IPs is larger than mask range
            // in this case we can use maxMask to mask as many as IPs from start we want.
            maxMask = Math.max(maxDiff, maxMask);

            // Add to results
            String ip = longToIP(start);
            result.add(ip + "/" + maxMask);
            // We have already included 2^(32 - maxMask) numbers of IP into result
            // So the next round start must add that number
            start += Math.pow(2, (32 - maxMask));
        }
        return result;
    }

    private static long ipToLong(String strIP) {
        String[] ipSegs = strIP.split("\\.");
        long res = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            res += Long.valueOf(ipSegs[i]) << (8 * (3 - i));
        }
        return res;
    }

    private static String longToIP(long longIP) {
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        sb.append(longIP >>> 24).append(".")
          .append((longIP & 0x00FFFFFF) >>> 16).append(".")
          .append(String.valueOf((longIP & 0x0000FFFF) >>> 8)).append(".")
          .append(String.valueOf(longIP & 0x000000FF));

        return sb.toString();
    }
}
  • I just replace the long static int array with start & - start, which is shortcur to find the first one. – 叶泰航 Sep 27 '16 at 17:25

So, I was able to find the Java code here: In Java, given an IP Address range, return the minimum list of CIDR blocks that covers the range

public class IP2CIDR {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(range2cidrlist("5.104.109.160", "5.104.109.191"));
    }

    public static List<String> range2cidrlist( String startIp, String endIp ) {         
        long start = ipToLong(startIp);         
        long end = ipToLong(endIp);           

        ArrayList<String> pairs = new ArrayList<String>();         
        while ( end >= start ) {             
            byte maxsize = 32;             
            while ( maxsize > 0) {                 
                long mask = CIDR2MASK[ maxsize -1 ];                 
                long maskedBase = start & mask;                 

                if ( maskedBase != start ) {                     
                    break;                 
                }                 

                maxsize--;             
            }               
            double x = Math.log( end - start + 1) / Math.log( 2 );             
            byte maxdiff = (byte)( 32 - Math.floor( x ) );             
            if ( maxsize < maxdiff) {                 
                maxsize = maxdiff;             
            }             
            String ip = longToIP(start);             
            pairs.add( ip + "/" + maxsize);             
            start += Math.pow( 2, (32 - maxsize) );         
        }         
        return pairs;     
    }       

    public static final int[] CIDR2MASK = new int[] { 0x00000000, 0x80000000,             
        0xC0000000, 0xE0000000, 0xF0000000, 0xF8000000, 0xFC000000,             
        0xFE000000, 0xFF000000, 0xFF800000, 0xFFC00000, 0xFFE00000,             
        0xFFF00000, 0xFFF80000, 0xFFFC0000, 0xFFFE0000, 0xFFFF0000,             
        0xFFFF8000, 0xFFFFC000, 0xFFFFE000, 0xFFFFF000, 0xFFFFF800,             
        0xFFFFFC00, 0xFFFFFE00, 0xFFFFFF00, 0xFFFFFF80, 0xFFFFFFC0,             
        0xFFFFFFE0, 0xFFFFFFF0, 0xFFFFFFF8, 0xFFFFFFFC, 0xFFFFFFFE,             
        0xFFFFFFFF };       

    private static long ipToLong(String strIP) {         
        long[] ip = new long[4];         
        String[] ipSec = strIP.split("\\.");         
        for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++) {             
            ip[k] = Long.valueOf(ipSec[k]);         
        }         

        return (ip[0] << 24) + (ip[1] << 16) + (ip[2] << 8) + ip[3];     
    }       

    private static String longToIP(long longIP) {         
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer("");         
        sb.append(String.valueOf(longIP >>> 24));         
        sb.append(".");         
        sb.append(String.valueOf((longIP & 0x00FFFFFF) >>> 16));         
        sb.append(".");         
        sb.append(String.valueOf((longIP & 0x0000FFFF) >>> 8));         
        sb.append(".");         
        sb.append(String.valueOf(longIP & 0x000000FF));   

        return sb.toString();     
    }
}

Thanks everyone for your insights and help!

In case you haven't figured it out from my comments:

IP math must be done in binary. IP addresses and masks are unsigned integers (32 bits for IPv4, 128 bits for IPv6). All you need to know is an address and mask, and you can figure out everything else.

This is algorithm for what you want to accomplish, and it applies to both IPv4 and IPv6.

Based on your question, you are given the subnet (Input 1) and last address (Input 2).

  1. Subtract the unsigned integer of Input 1 from the unsigned integer of Input 2. The result is the inverse subnet mask. The inverse subnet mask must be 0, or the inverse subnet mask plus 1 must be a power of 2, else you have an error in one of the inputs (STOP, INPUT ERROR).
  2. The NOT of the inverse mask (result of Step 1) is the subnet mask.
  3. If Input 1 AND the subnet mask does not equal Input 1, you have an error in one of the inputs (STOP, INPUT ERROR).
  4. The mask length (CIDR number) is the number of 1 bits in the subnet mask. There are several ways to calculate the number of 1 bits in a binary number, but if the subnet mask is the maximum integer (or the inverse mask is 0), then the mask length is 32 (IPv4) or 128 (IPv6). You can loop, counting the number of loops and shifting the subnet mask to the left until it equals 0, loop counting the number of loops and shifting the inverse mask to the right until it equals 0 then adding 1 to the total and subtracting the total from 32 (IPv4) or 128 (IPv6), or subtract the exponent of the power of 2 of the total inverse mask plus 1 from 32 (IPv4) or 128 (IPv6).
  5. At this point, you have the verified Input 1 (subnet), Input 2 (last address), and calculated the mask length (CIDR number).
  6. The final result will be <Input 1>/<Mask Length>.

Your example:

Step 1 (5.10.127.255 - 5.10.64.0 = 0.0.64.127):

101000010100111111111111111 - 01000010100100000000000000 = 11111111111111

Step 2 (NOT 0.0.64.255 = 255.255.192.0 is a power of two):

NOT 00000000000000000011111111111111 = 11111111111111111100000000000000

Step 3 (5.10.64.0 AND 255.255.192.0 = 5.10.64.0):

01000010100100000000000000 AND 11111111111111111100000000000000 = 01000010100100000000000000

Step 4 (0.0.64.255 + 1 = 0.0.65.0 = 2^14, exponent of 2^14 = 14, 32 - 14 = 18):

00000000000000000011111111111111 + 1 = 00000000000000000100000000000000 = 2^14, exponent of 2^14 = 14, 32 - 14 = 18

Step 5 (Input 1 = 5.10.64.0, Input 2 = 5.10.127.255, Mask Length = 18)

Step 6 (Final Result = 5.10.64.0/18)

  • This is quite insightful. Thanks for the detailed writeup! – Dhaval Kotecha Nov 3 '15 at 21:20
  • This handles the canonical cases. But doesn't explain how to handle a range such as 5.10.64.1 to 5.10.127.255 which results in 14 CIDRs: 5.10.64.1/32 5.10.64.2/31 5.10.64.4/30 5.10.64.8/29 5.10.64.16/28 5.10.64.32/27 5.10.64.64/26 5.10.64.128/25 5.10.65.0/24 5.10.66.0/23 5.10.68.0/22 5.10.72.0/21 5.10.80.0/20 5.10.96.0/19 – GreatAndPowerfulOz Jan 30 '17 at 21:05
  • Your example doesn't relate to the original question, which is what I was answering. – Ron Maupin Jan 30 '17 at 21:34

Something short and sweet in Python:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import ipaddress
import math

ip_from = '5.10.64.0'
ip_to = '5.10.127.255'
ip_from_long = int(ipaddress.ip_address(unicode(ip_from)))
ip_to_long = int(ipaddress.ip_address(unicode(ip_to)))
ip_range = ip_to_long - ip_from_long
ip_range +=1
# the clever line of code
cidr_range = math.log(4294967296/ip_range)/math.log(2)
# test for a zero/non-zero fractional part
if cidr_range % 1 == 0:
  # the output will be: 5.10.64.0/18
  print ip_from + '/' + str(int(cidr_range))
else:
  print "Error: Not an exact CIDR range - " + str(cidr_range)
public static int log2(int i) {
    int count = 0;
    i >>= 1;
    while(i > 0) {
        count++;
        i >>= 1;
    }
    return count;
}

public static List<String> range2CIDR(String startIp, String endIp) {
    List<String> res = new ArrayList<>();
    try {
        int start = ipS2I(startIp);
        int end = ipS2I(endIp);
        while(start <= end) {
            int firstNonZero = start & -start;
            int maxMask = 32 - log2(firstNonZero);
            maxMask = Math.max(maxMask, 32 - log2(end - start + 1));
            res.add(ipI2S(start) + "/" + maxMask);
            start += 1 << (32 - maxMask);
        }
    }catch(Exception e) {
        return res;
    }

    return res;
}

public static int ipS2I(String ip) throws Exception {
    String[] sa = ip.split("\\.");
    if (sa.length != 4) {
        throw new Exception("Bad ip address");
    }
    int res = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int t = Integer.valueOf(sa[i]);
        if (t < 0 || t > 255) {
            throw new Exception("Bad ip address");
        }
        res += t << ((3-i) << 3);
    }
    return res;
}

public static String ipI2S(int ip) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append((ip>>24) & 0xFF).append(".").append((ip>>16)&0xFF).append(".").append((ip>>8) & 0xFF).append(".").append(ip & 0xFF);
    return sb.toString();
}

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