With a single property this is fairly easy:


var jsonobj = {
    "test": "ok"
}
var propname = "test";
// Will alert "ok"
alert(jsonobj[propname]);

But what I want to do is use a nested property:


var jsonobj = {
    "test": {
        "test2": "ok"
    }
}
var propname = "test.test2";
// Alerts undefined
alert(jsonobj[propname]);

Is there any way of selecting a nested "dynamic" property? I know I can do jsonobj.test.test2, but the problem is that propname can change to a property that goes 1,2 or 3 levels deep. (e.g test, test.test2, ...)

  • Do you mean JSON, or a JavaScript object? They're not the same. – Matt Ball Jul 27 '10 at 14:16
up vote 12 down vote accepted
function resolve(cur, ns) {

    var undef;

    ns = ns.split('.');

    while (cur && ns[0])
        cur = cur[ns.shift()] || undef;

    return cur;

}

E.g.

// 1:
resolve({
    foo: { bar: 123 }
}, 'foo.bar'); // => 123


// 2:
var complex = {
    a: {
        b: [
            document.createElement('div')
        ]
    }
};

resolve(complex, 'a.b.0.nodeName'); // => DIV

The benefit in using this is that it won't throw an error if you try accessing something that doesn't exist -- it'll gracefully return undefined.


EDIT:

In the comment, Andy mentioned that this doesn't throw errors where one might expect it to. I agree that getting undefined is a little bit generic and there is no way to tell whether your value was really resolved. So, to remedy that, try this:

var resolve = (function(){

    var UNRESOLVED = resolve.UNRESOLVED = {};
    return resolve;

    function resolve(cur, ns) {

        var undef;

        ns = ns.split('.');

        while (cur && ns[0])
            cur = cur[ns.shift()] || undef;

        if (cur === undef || ns[0]) {
            return UNRESOLVED;
        }

        return cur;

    }

}());

It'll return an UNRESOLVED object that can be checked like so:

var result = resolve(someObject, 'a.b.c');

if (result === resolve.UNRESOLVED) {...}

It's not perfect, but it is (IMO) the best way to determine an unresolved namespace without having to throw errors. If you want errors, then just go ahead with:

someObject.a.b.c; //...
  • 1
    Gotta say, I quite like this. +1 – karim79 Jul 27 '10 at 14:16
  • This method is working fine for me, thanks a lot! – user403428 Jul 27 '10 at 14:21
  • +1 Nicely done! I liked the undefined edit as well :) – Josh Stodola Jul 27 '10 at 14:27
  • The major downside to this is there's no error control. If I mistype something in the node path, undefined is returned and you're none the wiser. It's akin to using PHP's @ operator for the same ends. – Andy E Jul 27 '10 at 14:35
  • 1
    Won't this code return undef if the property value is "falsy" i.e 0 or false or '' or null? This may (or may not) be what is required. – HBP Jul 27 '10 at 15:22

I also just implemented this using an inner recursive function like so:

function get(obj, ns) {            

    function recurse(o, props) {
        if (props.length === 0) {
            return o;
        }
        if (!o) {
            return undefined;
        }
        return recurse(o[props.shift()], props);
    }

    return recurse(obj, ns.split('.'));
}

This will return the deep value of the property specified by the ns param, otherwise will always return undefined if it doesn't exist or there are any problems along the way.

  • note that the recursive approach although prettier is slower than an iterative approach (at least in my tests) – sym3tri Sep 21 '11 at 6:56

You can write a little function to split the string and then access each piece in turn. For example:

function getProperty(propname, object)
{
    var props = propname.split('.');
    var obj = object;
    for (var i=0; i<props.length; i++)
    {
       obj = obj[props[i]];
    }
    return obj;
}

Obviously it nees a little extra coding to check for null objects, valid properties, etc.

This works, but rather suckily uses eval so I'm not recommending it's use:

var jsonobj = {
    "test": {
        "test2": "ok"
    }
}
var propname = "test.test2";
alert(eval("jsonobj." + propname));
​

Try it here: http://jsfiddle.net/TAgsU/

  • You'll still get a TypeError if you try accessing a property of a null/undefined value. – James Jul 27 '10 at 14:10
  • ...in addition to other potential catastrophes the above could lead to. That's why I've disrecommended it ;) – karim79 Jul 27 '10 at 14:14

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