I have read several articles on this subject, but it is still not clear to me if there is a difference between Promise.reject vs. throwing an error. For example,

Using Promise.reject

return asyncIsPermitted()
    .then(function(result) {
        if (result === true) {
            return true;
        }
        else {
            return Promise.reject(new PermissionDenied());
        }
    });

Using throw

return asyncIsPermitted()
    .then(function(result) {
        if (result === true) {
            return true;
        }
        else {
            throw new PermissionDenied();
        }
    });

My preference is to use throw simply because it is shorter, but was wondering if there is any advantage of one over the other.

  • 3
    Both methods produce the exact same response. The .then() handler catches the thrown exception and turns it into a rejected promise automatically. Since I've read that thrown exceptions are not particularly fast to execute, I would guess that returning the rejected promise might be slightly faster to execute, but you'd have to devise a test in multiple modern browsers if that was important to know. I personally use throw because I like the readability. – jfriend00 Oct 30 '15 at 22:11
  • @webduvet not with Promises - they are designed to work with throw. – joews Oct 30 '15 at 22:16
  • 8
    One downside to throw is that it wouldn't result in a rejected promise if it was thrown from within an asynchronous callback, such as a setTimeout. jsfiddle.net/m07van33 @Blondie your answer was correct. – Kevin B Oct 30 '15 at 22:24
  • @joews it doesn't mean it is good ;) – webduvet Oct 30 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    Ah, true. So a clarification to my comment would be, "if it was thrown from within an asynchronous callback that wasn't promisified". I knew there was an exception to that, i just couldn't remember what it was. I too prefer to use throw simply because i find it to be more readable, and allows me to omit reject it from my param list. – Kevin B Oct 30 '15 at 22:35
up vote 194 down vote accepted

There is no advantage of using one vs the other, but, there is a specific case where throw won't work. However, those cases can be fixed.

Any time you are inside of a promise callback, you can use throw. However, if you're in any other asynchronous callback, you must use reject.

For example,

new Promise(function() {
  setTimeout(function() {
    throw 'or nah';
    // return Promise.reject('or nah'); also won't work
  }, 1000);
}).catch(function(e) {
  console.log(e); // doesn't happen
});

won't trigger the catch, instead you're left with an unresolved promise and an uncaught exception. That is a case where you would want to instead use reject. However, you could fix this by promisifying the timeout:

function timeout(duration) { // Thanks joews
  return new Promise(function(resolve) {
    setTimeout(resolve, duration);
  });
}

timeout(1000).then(function() {
  throw 'worky!';
  // return Promise.reject('worky'); also works
}).catch(function(e) {
  console.log(e); // 'worky!'
});

  • 31
    Worth mentioning that the places inside a non-promisified async callback that you can't use throw error, you also can't use return Promise.reject(err) which is what the OP was asking us to compare. This is basically why you should not put async callbacks inside of promises. Promisify everything that's async and then you don't have these restrictions. – jfriend00 Oct 30 '15 at 23:00
  • 6
    "However, if you're in any other kind of callback" really should be "However, if you're in any other kind of asynchronous callback". Callbacks can be synchronous (e.g. with Array#forEach) and with those, throwing inside them would work. – Félix Saparelli Feb 16 '17 at 23:25
  • 1
    @KevinB reading these lines "there is a specific case where throw won't work." and "Any time you are inside of a promise callback, you can use throw. However, if you're in any other asynchronous callback, you must use reject." I get a feeling that the example snippets will show cases where throw will not work and instead Promise.reject is a better choice. However the snippets are unaffected with any of those two choices and give same result irrespective of what you choose. Am I missing something? – Anshul May 2 '17 at 13:25
  • 1
    @KevinB Yeah, but those snippets have exactly same behaviour irrespective of whether you throw or return a Promise.reject. I can't see the difference :( – Anshul May 3 '17 at 3:43
  • 1
    @KevinB What I meant was, for any of the snippets, it doesn't matter whether you are using throw or Promise.reject, you get exactly same behavior. For example Snippet 1, which doesn't catch the error, will not catch it irrespective of whether you used throw 'or nah' or did return Promise.reject('or nah'). – Anshul May 3 '17 at 13:31

Another important fact is that reject() DOES NOT terminate control flow like a return statement does. In contrast throw does terminate control flow.

Example:

new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  throw "err";
  console.log("NEVER REACHED");
})
.then(() => console.log("RESOLVED"))
.catch(() => console.log("REJECTED"));

vs

new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  reject(); // resolve() behaves similarly
  console.log("ALWAYS REACHED"); // "REJECTED" will print AFTER this
})
.then(() => console.log("RESOLVED"))
.catch(() => console.log("REJECTED"));

  • 1
    thanks, very useful information – Fareed Alnamrouti Nov 7 '16 at 6:35
  • 31
    Well the point is correct but the comparison is tricky. Because normally you should return your rejected promise by writing return reject(), so the next line won't run. – AZ. Jan 26 '17 at 23:45
  • 3
    Why would you want to return it? – lukyer Jan 27 '17 at 16:07
  • 16
    In this case, return reject() is simply a shorthand for reject(); return i.e. what you want is to terminate flow. The return value of the executor (the function passed to new Promise) is not used, so this is safe. – Félix Saparelli Feb 16 '17 at 23:19
  • I was looking for a short answer to make me understand why my code wasn't working. Thanks. – Karla Danitza Duran Memijes Nov 24 '17 at 18:01

Yes, the biggest difference is that reject is a callback function that gets carried out after the promise is rejected, whereas throw cannot be used asynchronously. If you chose to use reject, your code will continue to run normally in asynchronous fashion whereas throw will prioritize completing the resolver function (this function will run immediately).

An example I've seen that helped clarify the issue for me was that you could set a Timeout function with reject, for example:

new Promise(_, reject) {
 setTimeout(reject, 3000);
});

The above could would not be possible to write with throw.

In your small example the difference in indistinguishable but when dealing with more complicated asynchronous concept the difference between the two can be drastic.

  • 2
    Thanks, @Blondie. That's a very clear description of the difference. – Naresh Oct 31 '15 at 13:17
  • @Naresh, glad I could help. – Blondie Oct 31 '15 at 20:11
  • This should have been the accepted answer, it is simple and not confusing – Lingaraju E V Feb 15 at 15:02

TLDR: A function is hard to use when it sometimes returns a promise and sometimes throws an exception. When writing an async function, prefer to signal failure by returning a rejected promise

Your particular example obfuscates some important distinctions between them:

Because you are error handling inside a promise chain, thrown exceptions get automatically converted to rejected promises. This may explain why they seem to be interchangeable - they are not.

Consider the situation below:

checkCredentials = () => {
    let idToken = localStorage.getItem('some token');
    if ( idToken ) {
      return fetch(`https://someValidateEndpoint`, {
        headers: {
          Authorization: `Bearer ${idToken}`
        }
      })
    } else {
      throw new Error('No Token Found In Local Storage')
    }
  }

This would be an anti-pattern because you would then need to support both async and sync error cases. It might look something like:

try {
  function onFulfilled() { ... do the rest of your logic }
  function onRejected() { // handle async failure - like network timeout }
  checkCredentials(x).then(onFulfilled, onRejected);
} catch (e) {
  // Error('No Token Found In Local Storage')
  // handle synchronous failure
} 

Not good and here is exactly where Promise.reject ( available in the global scope ) comes to the rescue and effectively differentiates itself from throw. The refactor now becomes:

checkCredentials = () => {
  let idToken = localStorage.getItem('some_token');
  if (!idToken) {
    return Promise.reject('No Token Found In Local Storage')
  }
  return fetch(`https://someValidateEndpoint`, {
    headers: {
      Authorization: `Bearer ${idToken}`
    }
  })
}

This now lets you use just one catch() for network failures and the synchronous error check for lack of tokens:

checkCredentials()
      .catch((error) => if ( error == 'No Token' ) {
      // do no token modal
      } else if ( error === 400 ) {
      // do not authorized modal. etc.
      }
  • 1
    Op's example always returns a promise, however. The question is referring to whether you should use Promise.reject or throw when you want to return a rejected promise (a promise that will jump to the next .catch()). – marcospgp Oct 19 '17 at 11:50
  • @maxwell - I like you example. In the same time if on the fetch you will add a catch and in it you throw the exception then you will be safe to use try ... catch... There is no perfect world on exception flow, but I think that using one single pattern makes sense, and combining the patterns is not safe (aligned with your pattern vs anti-pattern analogy). – user3053247 Nov 6 '17 at 0:12
  • Excellent answer but I find here a flaw - this pattern assume all errors are handled by returning a Promise.reject - what happens with all the unexpected errors that simply might be thrown from checkCredentials()? – chenop Sep 4 at 13:07
  • 1
    Yeah you're right @chenop - to catch those unexpected errors you would need to wrap in try/catch still – maxwell Sep 4 at 17:26

An example to try out. Just change isVersionThrow to false to use reject instead of throw.

const isVersionThrow = true

class TestClass {
  async testFunction () {
    if (isVersionThrow) {
      console.log('Throw version')
      throw new Error('Fail!')
    } else {
      console.log('Reject version')
      return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        reject(new Error('Fail!'))
      })
    }
  }
}

const test = async () => {
  const test = new TestClass()
  try {
    var response = await test.testFunction()
    return response 
  } catch (error) {
    console.log('ERROR RETURNED')
    throw error 
  }  
}

test()
.then(result => {
  console.log('result: ' + result)
})
.catch(error => {
  console.log('error: ' + error)
})

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