75

I'm tring the ES6 syntax in React, and write the components like:

export default class Loginform extends React.Component {
    getInitialState() {
        return {
          name: '',
          password: ''
        };
    };
}

but the browser throws me a waring about:

Warning: getInitialState was defined on Loginform, a plain JavaScript class. This is only supported for classes created using React.createClass. Did you mean to define a state property instead?

I can handle it with the traditional syntax var Loginform = React.createClass but what's correct ES6 syntax?

Another little thing, I think in traditional syntax React.createClass is an object, so the functions in it is separated by comma, but with the extends class it require semicolon, I don't understand it well.

148

You don't need semicolons or commas between ES6 class method declarations.

For ES6 classes, getInitialState has been deprecated in favor of declaring an initial state object in the constructor:

export default class Loginform extends React.Component {
  constructor(props, context) {
    super(props, context);

    this.state = {
      name: '',
      password: ''
    };
  };
}
  • With this, when console.log(this.state.name), it throws an error about Cannot read property 'state' of null – Brick Yang Oct 31 '15 at 2:05
  • 4
    Where are you trying to call it? In ES6 classes this is not automatically bound, which might be part of the problem: facebook.github.io/react/blog/2015/01/27/… – max Oct 31 '15 at 2:08
  • yes, it works, thx, accepted! – Brick Yang Oct 31 '15 at 2:17
  • 2
    Quoting from the linked article: "One of the niceties provided by React's createClass functionality was that it automatically bound your methods to a component instance. For example, this meant that within a click callback this would be bound to the component. With the move to ES6 classes, we must handle this binding ourselves. The React team recommends prebinding in the constructor." newmediacampaigns.com/blog/… – Con Antonakos Oct 31 '15 at 5:11
  • 1
    I kinda liked it the way it was with ES5 - and getInitialState() – Alexander Mills Jan 22 '17 at 2:28
6

ES6 example: state, defaultProps, propTypes

import React from 'react'
import ReactDom from 'react-dom';
export default class Item extends React.Component{
    constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.state = {
            check:false,
        };
        this.click=this.click.bind(this);
    }
    click(){
       this.setState({check:true});
    }
    render(){
        const text=this.state.check?'yes':'no';
        return(<div onClick={this.click}>{this.props.name} : <b>{text}</b></div>)
    }

}

Item.defaultProps={
    comment:"default comment",
};
Item.propTypes={
    name:React.PropTypes.string.isRequired,
};
1

If we use class field, following is working.

state = {
      name: '',
      password: ''
}

This can be used instead of

constructor(props, context) {
    super(props, context);

    this.state = {
      name: '',
      password: ''
    };
  };

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