70

I'm new to Go and can't seem to find a way to delete all the contents of a directory when I don't know the contents.

I've tried:

os.RemoveAll("/tmp/*")
os.Remove("/tmp/*")

but get remove *: no such file or directory or invalid argument.

And of course if you do:

os.RemoveAll("/tmp/")

it deletes the tmp directory as well. Which is not what I want.

3
  • Ofc you use shell-commands to do that and call os.Exec. – 0x434D53 Oct 31 '15 at 12:49
  • 3
    @0x434D53: Shell commands are OS and shell dependent. Use Go package os OS and shell independent functions for portability. For example, I tested my Go solution on Linux and Windows. – peterSO Oct 31 '15 at 13:12
  • 1
    Ofc they are. Was just an additional suggestion that might fit his usecase. Had a reason i did not write it as an answer. – 0x434D53 Oct 31 '15 at 13:14
41

Write a simple RemoveContents function. For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "os"
    "path/filepath"
    "strings"
)

func RemoveContents(dir string) error {
    d, err := os.Open(dir)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    defer d.Close()
    names, err := d.Readdirnames(-1)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    for _, name := range names {
        err = os.RemoveAll(filepath.Join(dir, name))
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }
    return nil
}

func main() {
    dir := strings.TrimSuffix(filepath.Base(os.Args[0]), filepath.Ext(os.Args[0]))
    dir = filepath.Join(os.TempDir(), dir)
    dirs := filepath.Join(dir, `tmpdir`)
    err := os.MkdirAll(dirs, 0777)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    file := filepath.Join(dir, `tmpfile`)
    f, err := os.Create(file)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    f.Close()
    file = filepath.Join(dirs, `tmpfile`)
    f, err = os.Create(file)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    f.Close()

    err = RemoveContents(dir)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        os.Exit(1)
    }
}
2
  • thanks for this, I have actually gone with something similar but using ioutil.ReadDir to save opening the dir. Thanks – mattl Oct 31 '15 at 13:09
  • 4
    @mattl: That's not good. For package os, "Readdirnames reads and returns a slice of names from the directory." For package ioutil, "ReadDir reads the directory named by dirname and returns a list of sorted directory entries." Switching from os to ioutil, you added an unnecessary sort of the name list: func ReadDir: sort.Sort(byName(list)). – peterSO Nov 1 '15 at 22:13
109

It might be a stupid answer, but why not simply do?

os.RemoveAll("/tmp/")
os.MkdirAll("/tmp/",FileMode)
8
  • I'm not sure, either it didn't exist when this question was raised or it does something unexpected. – mattl May 30 '16 at 16:09
  • It most probably existed as he talked about removeall , so it might do something unexpected, but I'd like to know what as I use this method pretty often – Lomithrani May 30 '16 at 17:18
  • @Lomithrani RemoveAll says that it exits on the first encounter of an error. Individually removing each file would allow you to remove more in a case where multiple errors would be expected. That's all I could come up with after reading the documentation. – anon58192932 May 31 '16 at 16:29
  • 7
    oh hang on, I think we were trying to delete the contents of a directory but not the directory itself. As I said at the bottom of my question removeAll removes the parent directory as well. Making the directory again would work but would need to match the current permissions set on it. – mattl Jun 1 '16 at 17:22
  • 8
    This won't work if you don't have permission to remove /tmp. – aioobe Mar 2 '18 at 8:20
14

Just use ioutil.ReadDir to get a slice of os.FileInfo types, then iterate through and remove each child item using os.RemoveAll.

package main

import (
    "io/ioutil"
    "os"
    "path"
)

func main() {
    dir, err := ioutil.ReadDir("/tmp")
    for _, d := range dir {
        os.RemoveAll(path.Join([]string{"tmp", d.Name()}...))
    }
}

That way, you are removing only all the child items and not the parent /tmp folder itself.

I have used this pattern many times before (e.g. test logs, etc.).

1
func RemoveContents(dir string) error {
    files, err := filepath.Glob(filepath.Join(dir, "*"))
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    for _, file := range files {
        err = os.RemoveAll(file)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }
    return nil
}
1
  • No good. Pattern * doesn't match hidden files (names starting with a dot, like .config.yaml for example). OP asked to delete all teh contents of a directory. – kubanczyk Jan 21 '20 at 21:03

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