2

I'm handling a Bluetooth connection with Android and I'd like to read the InputStream buffer until I get some specific character like '\n' (new line) or any other character and leave the buffer as it is, then read the following bytes again until the same character is read in order to place them in separate strings. I tried several ways with no success, can anybody help me?

The code I'm using to get the data is the following

public String getData() {
    try {
        inStream = btSocket.getInputStream();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }


    try {
        inStream.read(inString);
    }
    catch (IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    String str= new String(inString, StandardCharsets.UTF_8);

    return str;
}
3
  • Google for readLine() of reader classses and you are done.
    – greenapps
    Nov 1 '15 at 20:38
  • Thanks. I see this is specifically for the '\n'. But how about any other specific char?
    – mialver
    Nov 1 '15 at 20:41
  • Then make your own readline(). It's very simple. Make a loop in which you read bytes one by one and check if the byte contains that char. Add the bytes to a buffer which you return.
    – greenapps
    Nov 1 '15 at 20:43
2

If you want to read until you find a specific char, one solution could be something like this:

public static String readUntilChar(InputStream stream, char target) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    try {
        BufferedReader buffer=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(stream));

        int r;
        while ((r = buffer.read()) != -1) {
            char c = (char) r;

            if (c == target)
                break;

            sb.append(c);
        }

        System.out.println(sb.toString());
    } catch(IOException e) {
        // Error handling
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
1
  • However you write you want to "read the following bytes again until the same character is read in order to place them in separate strings", sounds more like a need for String.split after reading the full buffer (?). Maybe I'm just crazy :] Or is your goal to read a stream say here&comestext&somemore and read from & until & giving you comestext ? Nov 1 '15 at 22:19
0

Finally, I got a solution. I don't know if it's the most optimum, but it works fine. I post the code in case it's useful for someone else. Thanks for your responses.

Function to get the input stream char by char:

    public char getData() {
    try {
        inStream = btSocket.getInputStream();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }


    try {
        inStream.read(inString,0,1);
    }
    catch (IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    String str= new String(inString, StandardCharsets.UTF_8);

    inChar=str.charAt(0);

    return inChar;
   }

Function to get the desired strings when the character '&' appears:

public void procesChar(char inChar){
        if(inChar=='&'){
            String str=new String(charBuffer);
            countBytes=0;
            Arrays.fill(charBuffer,(char)-1);
        }
        else {
            charBuffer[countBytes] = inChar;
            countBytes++;
        }
    }
2
  • ' inStream.read(inString,0,1);'. What is inString? Why isn't it declared locally? If it is a String then you are asking for problems. 'String str= new String(inString, StandardCharsets.UTF_8);'. Do not convert one readed byte or char to a String. And certainly not to utf-8 which is impossible all the way. You are asking for problems. Maybe the code works for you. But it is very bad code. Also using the Array class and char class is bad as you are receiving bytes.
    – greenapps
    Nov 2 '15 at 10:42
  • inString is a byte[], and yes, I should have declared it locally (changed it already). The String creation with the defined charset is something I saw in an example from input stream data, it also works without it.
    – mialver
    Nov 3 '15 at 0:46

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