1

I wrote a crawler application whose data is persisted to a PostgreSQL 9.4 database. The schema I wrote consists of two tables (relevant to the problem):

  • sources, a list of web domains
  • webpages, a list of web pages linked to their source

The crawler needs to be able to find the next n webpages row which fulfills these conditions:

  • the webpage's next column value must be inferior to now()
  • the webpage's locked column value must be at FALSE
  • the webpage's source's next column value must be inferior to now()

Also:

  • each matching webpage row has to be updated so that the locked column value is set to TRUE. (The value of the next column is updated by the app after the HTTP)
  • each source row linked to a matching webpage row has to be updated so that the next column value is set to now() + frequency. Where frequency is just custom integer variable.

It's a concurrent system so updates must be done with locks otherwise some webpages will be returned multiple times on concurrent queries.

The issues I have with my current query is that:

  • the query is relatively slow (hundreds of ms on 130k sources and 21M webpages)
  • duplicate webpages are returned in concurrent queries
  • also looking for general improvements

Here are the two queries I tried:

Query n°1:

WITH ssss AS (
    UPDATE sources sss
    SET
        next = now() + interval '1 milliseconds' * frequency,
    FROM (
        SELECT s.domain, s.compression
        FROM (
            SELECT id, domain, compression
            FROM sources
            WHERE
                next <= now()
            ORDER BY next ASC
            LIMIT limit,
            OFFSET 0
        ) s
        WHERE
            pg_try_advisory_xact_lock(s.id)
    ) ss
    WHERE sss.domain = ss.domain
    RETURNING sss.domain, sss.compression
)
UPDATE webpages www
SET
    locked = TRUE
FROM (
    SELECT w.url, ssss.compression
    FROM webpages w
    INNER JOIN ssss
    ON w.domain = ssss.domain
    WHERE
        next <= now()
        AND
        locked = FALSE
    LIMIT limit,
) ww
WHERE www.url = ww.url
RETURNING www.refreshpow, www.url, www.type, www.domain, ww.compression;

Query n°2:

WITH ssss AS (
    UPDATE sources sss
    SET
        next = now() + interval '1 milliseconds' * frequency,
    FROM (
        SELECT s.domain, s.compression
        FROM (
            SELECT id, domain, compression
            FROM sources
            WHERE
                next <= now()
            ORDER BY next ASC
            LIMIT limit,
            OFFSET 0
        ) s
        WHERE
            pg_try_advisory_xact_lock(s.id)
    ) ss
    WHERE sss.domain = ss.domain
    RETURNING sss.domain, sss.compression
)
UPDATE webpages wwww
SET
    locked = TRUE
FROM (
    SELECT ww.id, ww.url, ww.compression
    FROM (
        SELECT w.id, w.url, ssss.compression
        FROM webpages w
        INNER JOIN ssss
        ON w.domain = ssss.domain
        WHERE
            next <= now()
            AND
            locked = FALSE
        LIMIT limit,
        OFFSET 0
    ) ww
    WHERE
            pg_try_advisory_xact_lock(ww.id)
) www
WHERE wwww.url = www.url
RETURNING wwww.refreshpow, wwww.url, wwww.type, wwww.domain, www.compression;

Below listed are a few issues I encountered during the development of the SQL query so that you can understand why I arrived at this query:

  • PostgreSQL doesn't have an UPDATE ... LIMIT 1 which means you have to do a subquery or CTE (see: UPDATE ... LIMIT 1 answer)
  • Since this subqueries / CTEs introduce race-conditions, row's matched by the inner SELECT need to be locked with FOR UPDATE or pg_try_advisory_xact_lock (see: UPDATE ... LIMIT 1 answer)
  • PostgreSQL's optimiser doesn't respect operator associativity order. e.g: in the statement (a = b) AND (c = d), (c = d) could get executed before (a = b). So if you want to only lock matching rows until a LIMIT limit, you need to put the SELECT in another subquery / CTE inside the already embedded subquery / CTE SELECT. (see: UPDATE ... LIMIT 1 answer)
  • OFFSET 0 is used to prevent inlining

Here are my table schemas:

The sources table schema:

CREATE TABLE sources
(
  id serial NOT NULL,
  domain text NOT NULL,
  created timestamp with time zone,
  topic character varying(255),
  last timestamp with time zone,
  next timestamp with time zone NOT NULL,
  compression boolean DEFAULT true,
  CONSTRAINT sources_pkey PRIMARY KEY (domain)
)

CREATE INDEX next_index
  ON sources
  USING btree
  (next);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX sources_domain
  ON sources
  USING btree
  (domain COLLATE pg_catalog."default");

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX sources_id
  ON sources
  USING btree
  (id);

The webpages table:

CREATE TABLE webpages
(
  id serial NOT NULL,
  url text NOT NULL,
  created timestamp with time zone,
  locked boolean DEFAULT false,
  type enum_webpages_type,
  last timestamp with time zone,
  next timestamp with time zone NOT NULL,
  refreshpow integer NOT NULL DEFAULT 2,
  locale character varying(255),
  title text,
  image text,
  date timestamp with time zone,
  tags text[],
  authors text[],
  summary text,
  html text,
  domain text,
  parent text,
  error uuid,
  CONSTRAINT webpages_pkey PRIMARY KEY (url),
  CONSTRAINT webpages_domain_fkey FOREIGN KEY (domain)
      REFERENCES sources (domain) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT webpages_error_fkey FOREIGN KEY (error)
      REFERENCES errors (id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE NO ACTION,
  CONSTRAINT webpages_parent_fkey FOREIGN KEY (parent)
      REFERENCES webpages (url) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE NO ACTION
)

CREATE INDEX webpages_domain
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (domain COLLATE pg_catalog."default");

CREATE INDEX webpages_error
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (error);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX webpages_id
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (id);

CREATE INDEX webpages_last
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (last);

CREATE INDEX webpages_next_locked
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (next, locked);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX webpages_url
  ON webpages
  USING btree
  (url COLLATE pg_catalog."default");

This is based on my limited understanding of SQL and PostgreSQL so I'm happy to get any help I can.

3
  • You'd be lucky if someone reviews the above text, because although it genuinely looks like you've done your research and attempts, a too long question with open questions generally doesn't get correct / required answers. – Robins Tharakan Nov 2 '15 at 0:13
  • 2
    While you're at it, if it isn't too late, you may want to try the SKIP LOCKED feature of 9.5 (almost out any time now) which should help you a great deal in such scenarios. – Robins Tharakan Nov 2 '15 at 0:14
  • 2
    Attempts at writing a DIY queuing system almost always fail, either with race conditions like in the above, or with false concurrency where you think it's parallel, but everything just lands up queuing on a lock. Writing a queue in a RDBMs is annoyingly hard. PostgreSQL 9.5's SKIP LOCKED will help a lot with this. For older versions consider using an existing, established queue system, or read some of the numerous articles about using advisory locking for task queueing. (Haven't read full code, so just leaving a note.) – Craig Ringer Nov 2 '15 at 2:15

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