0

I'm trying to inject a dependency into my Silex Controller, because I need an object of type user in my controller and handle some stuff with it.

$app->mount("/users", new \MyApp\Controller\Provider\User($user));

And I implemented the controller by implementing the ControllerProviderInterface:

class User implements ControllerProviderInterface{
    protected $user;

    public function __construct($user){
        //...
    }

    public function connect(Application $app)
    {
        //...
    }
}

The routes and the methods are all set up in the controller. Without the dependency injection everything works fine. But as long as I edit the code and add the injection I get the following error:

Missing argument 1 for ...::__construct()

When I create the object, I send that parameter to it, but somehow Silex creates an instance before with a constructor without passing any argument.

4

Another approach is to use a ServiceController instead of a ControllerProvider. You can achieve a more familiar dependency injection feel this way.

$app->register(new Silex\Provider\ServiceControllerServiceProvider());

$app["user"] = function () {
    return new User();
};
$app["user.controller"] = function () use ($app) {
    return new UserController($app["user"]);
};

$app->get("/users/{id}", "user.controller:get");

...

class User implements UserInterface
{
    // ...
}

...

class UserController
{
    protected $user;

    public function __construct(UserInterface $user)
    {
        $this->user = $user;
    }

    public function get(Request $request, $id)
    {
        $this->user;

        // Do stuff
    }
}

Reference: http://silex.sensiolabs.org/doc/providers/service_controller.html

  • That looks way more familiar. I think I will use the ServiceController, because it feels more like dependency injection as we know it. Thanks for your answer and your help! – Tobias Nov 3 '15 at 11:01
1

Silex takes a different approach to dependency injection than you might be used to or might expect. Silex\Application is the dependency injection container that is available in almost any context in a Silex application. You register your dependencies with the $app and those dependencies are injected via the $app in any context you might need it. Here is an example of something you might do in your situation.

$app["user"] = function () {
    return new \MyApp\Service\User();
};

$app->mount("/users", new \MyApp\Controller\Provider\User());

...

class User implements ControllerProviderInterface
{
    public function connect(Application $app)
    {
        $controller = $app["controller_factory"];

        $controller->get("/{id}", array($this, "get"));

        return $controller;
    }

    public function get(Application $app, Request $request, $id)
    {
        $user = $app["user"];

        // Do stuff
    }
}

Dependency injection in Silex is different and it takes a little getting used to, but once you are comfortable with it, it's a pleasure to work with and it's very efficient.

  • Thank you so much! :) – Tobias Nov 2 '15 at 8:13
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This accepted answer is not the answer to the question. And the thing described in the answer is not dependency injection either, or a realy crude form of it. Its more like Hardcoding $app into your controllers.

The code in the question should work without changes. The code in the connect function and the constructor might be helpful to figure out, where your problem sits. Its not the call to mount, im sure.

  • What do you suggest? I can inject the dependency via the $app object, but yes, it's not the prettiest way. Maybe you can give an example how it should be done properly. My code doesn't work and I can not figure out where the bug is. Thanks – Tobias Nov 2 '15 at 23:30
  • @bloodstix, My goal was to present the idiomatic Silex way to do it. Like I said in my answer, Silex takes a different approach to injecting dependencies. It's not what most people think of when they think of dependency injection, but it serves the same purpose. You could argue that it's not strict dependency injection, but that really wasn't my point. – Jason Desrosiers Nov 2 '15 at 23:45
  • No it does not. It just does not present you with an automatic for this. Register your single dependencies in $app and give your classes, which need the dependencies, the concrete index on $app for the Component. That would be dependency injection. Ask for concrete things, not for containers. – bloodstix Jan 12 '16 at 14:43

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