54

Goal

I want to make a custom keyboard that is only used within my app, not a system keyboard that needs to be installed.

What I have read and tried

Documentation

The first article above states:

Make sure a custom, systemwide keyboard is indeed what you want to develop. To provide a fully custom keyboard for just your app or to supplement the system keyboard with custom keys in just your app, the iOS SDK provides other, better options. Read about custom input views and input accessory views in Custom Views for Data Input in Text Programming Guide for iOS.

That is what led me to the second article above. However, that article did not have enough detail to get me started.

Tutorials

I was able to get a working keyboard from the second tutorial in the list above. However, I couldn't find any tutorials that showed how to make an in app only keyboard as described in the Custom Views for Data Input documentation.

Stack Overflow

I also asked (and answered) these questions on my way to answering the current question.

Question

Does anyone have a minimal example (with even one button) of an in app custom keyboard? I am not looking for a whole tutorial, just a proof of concept that I can expand on myself.

2
  • In how many places do you have to enter input with this keyboard? If it's just one and there isn't much stuff in the view, you could just make the keyboard part of the view.
    – Arc676
    Nov 2 '15 at 10:46
  • Eventually I would like to make a keyboard with 20 or 30 buttons. First, though, I would like to make a very simple keyboard with just a button or two to learn the process.
    – Suragch
    Nov 2 '15 at 13:13
79

enter image description here

This is a basic in-app keyboard. The same method could be used to make just about any keyboard layout. Here are the main things that need to be done:

  • Create the keyboard layout in an .xib file, whose owner is a .swift file that contains a UIView subclass.
  • Tell the UITextField to use the custom keyboard.
  • Use a delegate to communicate between the keyboard and the main view controller.

Create the .xib keyboard layout file

  • In Xcode go to File > New > File... > iOS > User Interface > View to create the .xib file.
  • I called mine Keyboard.xib
  • Add the buttons that you need.
  • Use auto layout constraints so that no matter what size the keyboard is, the buttons will resize accordingly.
  • Set the File's Owner (not the root view) to be the Keyboard.swift file. This is a common source of error. See the note at the end.

Create the .swift UIView subclass keyboard file

  • In Xcode go to File > New > File... > iOS > Source > Cocoa Touch Class to create the .swift file.
  • I called mine Keyboard.swift
  • Add the following code:

    import UIKit
    
    // The view controller will adopt this protocol (delegate)
    // and thus must contain the keyWasTapped method
    protocol KeyboardDelegate: class {
        func keyWasTapped(character: String)
    }
    
    class Keyboard: UIView {
    
        // This variable will be set as the view controller so that 
        // the keyboard can send messages to the view controller.
        weak var delegate: KeyboardDelegate?
    
        // MARK:- keyboard initialization
    
        required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
            super.init(coder: aDecoder)
            initializeSubviews()
        }
    
        override init(frame: CGRect) {
            super.init(frame: frame)
            initializeSubviews()
        }
    
        func initializeSubviews() {
            let xibFileName = "Keyboard" // xib extention not included
            let view = Bundle.main.loadNibNamed(xibFileName, owner: self, options: nil)![0] as! UIView
            self.addSubview(view)
            view.frame = self.bounds
        }
    
        // MARK:- Button actions from .xib file
    
        @IBAction func keyTapped(sender: UIButton) {
            // When a button is tapped, send that information to the 
            // delegate (ie, the view controller)
            self.delegate?.keyWasTapped(character: sender.titleLabel!.text!) // could alternatively send a tag value
        }
    
    }
    
  • Control drag from the buttons in the .xib file to the @IBAction method in the .swift file to hook them all up.

  • Note that the protocol and delegate code. See this answer for a simple explanation about how delegates work.

Set up the View Controller

  • Add a UITextField to your main storyboard and connect it to your view controller with an IBOutlet. Call it textField.
  • Use the following code for the View Controller:

    import UIKit
    
    class ViewController: UIViewController, KeyboardDelegate {
    
        @IBOutlet weak var textField: UITextField!
    
        override func viewDidLoad() {
            super.viewDidLoad()
    
            // initialize custom keyboard
            let keyboardView = Keyboard(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 0, height: 300))
            keyboardView.delegate = self // the view controller will be notified by the keyboard whenever a key is tapped
    
            // replace system keyboard with custom keyboard
            textField.inputView = keyboardView
        }
    
        // required method for keyboard delegate protocol
        func keyWasTapped(character: String) {
            textField.insertText(character)
        }
    }
    
  • Note that the view controller adopts the KeyboardDelegate protocol that we defined above.

Common error

If you are getting an EXC_BAD_ACCESS error, it is probably because you set the view's custom class as Keyboard.swift rather than do this for the nib File's Owner.

Select Keyboard.nib and then choose File's Owner.

enter image description here

Make sure that the custom class for the root view is blank.

enter image description here

22
  • When I click keys not call keyWasTapped method. any idea?
    – Piraba
    Sep 22 '16 at 7:27
  • 1
    @Piraba, Is @IBAction func keyTapped called? If no, then you probably didn't hook up the IBActions. If yes, then you probably didn't set up the delegate correctly.
    – Suragch
    Sep 22 '16 at 7:37
  • 1
    @Suragch, I had an issue with let keyboardView = Keyboard(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 0, height: 300)). I do not know if a recent update to Swift caused it. With the "width" initially set to 0, the buttons did not respond to touch up inside. Even though the view automatically resized to the full width and was visible. I changed the call to be the minimum size of the frame in XIB to include the buttons and everything worked perfectly. Thanks for the post! This was exactly what I was looking for.
    – McInvale
    Jun 27 '17 at 21:38
  • 1
    FWIW, I’d suggest using the existing UIKeyInput protocol, rather than defining your own.
    – Rob
    Jul 28 '19 at 21:06
  • 1
    @Greg, I haven't worked on iOS IMEs for a while but you can study the source code of this one that I did a while back: github.com/suragch/MongolianIPAKeyboardContainer That one is a system keyboard, though. This one includes an in app keyboard: github.com/suragch/Chimee-iOS
    – Suragch
    Oct 5 '20 at 3:10
29

The key is to use the existing UIKeyInput protocol, to which UITextField already conforms. Then your keyboard view need only to send insertText() and deleteBackward() to the control.

The following example creates a custom numeric keyboard:

class DigitButton: UIButton {
    var digit: Int = 0
}

class NumericKeyboard: UIView {
    weak var target: UIKeyInput?
    var useDecimalSeparator: Bool

    var numericButtons: [DigitButton] = (0...9).map {
        let button = DigitButton(type: .system)
        button.digit = $0
        button.setTitle("\($0)", for: .normal)
        button.titleLabel?.font = .preferredFont(forTextStyle: .largeTitle)
        button.setTitleColor(.black, for: .normal)
        button.layer.borderWidth = 0.5
        button.layer.borderColor = UIColor.darkGray.cgColor
        button.accessibilityTraits = [.keyboardKey]
        button.addTarget(self, action: #selector(didTapDigitButton(_:)), for: .touchUpInside)
        return button
    }

    var deleteButton: UIButton = {
        let button = UIButton(type: .system)
        button.setTitle("⌫", for: .normal)
        button.titleLabel?.font = .preferredFont(forTextStyle: .largeTitle)
        button.setTitleColor(.black, for: .normal)
        button.layer.borderWidth = 0.5
        button.layer.borderColor = UIColor.darkGray.cgColor
        button.accessibilityTraits = [.keyboardKey]
        button.accessibilityLabel = "Delete"
        button.addTarget(self, action: #selector(didTapDeleteButton(_:)), for: .touchUpInside)
        return button
    }()

    lazy var decimalButton: UIButton = {
        let button = UIButton(type: .system)
        let decimalSeparator = Locale.current.decimalSeparator ?? "."
        button.setTitle(decimalSeparator, for: .normal)
        button.titleLabel?.font = .preferredFont(forTextStyle: .largeTitle)
        button.setTitleColor(.black, for: .normal)
        button.layer.borderWidth = 0.5
        button.layer.borderColor = UIColor.darkGray.cgColor
        button.accessibilityTraits = [.keyboardKey]
        button.accessibilityLabel = decimalSeparator
        button.addTarget(self, action: #selector(didTapDecimalButton(_:)), for: .touchUpInside)
        return button
    }()

    init(target: UIKeyInput, useDecimalSeparator: Bool = false) {
        self.target = target
        self.useDecimalSeparator = useDecimalSeparator
        super.init(frame: .zero)
        configure()
    }

    required init?(coder: NSCoder) {
        fatalError("init(coder:) has not been implemented")
    }
}

// MARK: - Actions

extension NumericKeyboard {
    @objc func didTapDigitButton(_ sender: DigitButton) {
        target?.insertText("\(sender.digit)")
    }

    @objc func didTapDecimalButton(_ sender: DigitButton) {
        target?.insertText(Locale.current.decimalSeparator ?? ".")
    }

    @objc func didTapDeleteButton(_ sender: DigitButton) {
        target?.deleteBackward()
    }
}

// MARK: - Private initial configuration methods

private extension NumericKeyboard {
    func configure() {
        autoresizingMask = [.flexibleWidth, .flexibleHeight]
        addButtons()
    }

    func addButtons() {
        let stackView = createStackView(axis: .vertical)
        stackView.frame = bounds
        stackView.autoresizingMask = [.flexibleWidth, .flexibleHeight]
        addSubview(stackView)

        for row in 0 ..< 3 {
            let subStackView = createStackView(axis: .horizontal)
            stackView.addArrangedSubview(subStackView)

            for column in 0 ..< 3 {
                subStackView.addArrangedSubview(numericButtons[row * 3 + column + 1])
            }
        }

        let subStackView = createStackView(axis: .horizontal)
        stackView.addArrangedSubview(subStackView)

        if useDecimalSeparator {
            subStackView.addArrangedSubview(decimalButton)
        } else {
            let blank = UIView()
            blank.layer.borderWidth = 0.5
            blank.layer.borderColor = UIColor.darkGray.cgColor
            subStackView.addArrangedSubview(blank)
        }

        subStackView.addArrangedSubview(numericButtons[0])
        subStackView.addArrangedSubview(deleteButton)
    }

    func createStackView(axis: NSLayoutConstraint.Axis) -> UIStackView {
        let stackView = UIStackView()
        stackView.axis = axis
        stackView.alignment = .fill
        stackView.distribution = .fillEqually
        return stackView
    }
}

Then you can:

textField.inputView = NumericKeyboard(target: textField)

That yields:

enter image description here

Or, if you want a decimal separator, too, you can:

textField.inputView = NumericKeyboard(target: textField, useDecimalSeparator: true)

The above is fairly primitive, but it illustrates the idea: Make you own input view and use the UIKeyInput protocol to communicate keyboard input to the control.

Also please note the use of accessibilityTraits to get the correct “Spoken Content” » “Speak Screen” behavior. And if you use images for your buttons, make sure to set accessibilityLabel, too.

12
  • 1
    I would like to add Done button in this keyboard, i add that but now on action how to resign keyboard Oct 4 '19 at 5:20
  • 1
    @RahulPhate - Change target from a UIKeyInput? to a (UIResponder & UIKeyInput)? (and make the corresponding change to the init method, too). Then you can call target?.resignFirstResponder() in your button handler.
    – Rob
    Dec 26 '19 at 19:40
  • 1
    The idea of inputView is to use your own custom keyboard/view in place of the standard keyboard. But if you don’t want it presented where a keyboard normally is, then perhaps you don’t want to use inputView at all, but rather just a bunch of buttons placed in some view that update some label as you tap on them. If you have additional questions, though, I’d suggest that comments here under this answer might not be the right place for this discussion. If you don’t find anything after doing some research, just post your own question...
    – Rob
    Oct 5 '20 at 4:13
  • 1
    @Elin If you don't instantiate buttons, you won't have anything to tap on. Lol. If you are leaking these buttons, it is likely because you are leaking the UITextField or UITextView for which you have set this inputView. That can happen if you are leaking your view controller, for whose view/storyboard/nib is being used. But the problem is not in the instantiation of the buttons, undoubtedly something higher up in the view and/or view controller hierarchy. But I just tested this, and buttons are instantiated and released fine. In short, your problem rests elsewhere.
    – Rob
    Apr 2 at 0:39
  • 1
    Yeah, you want a different keyboard instance for every control (so that each can communicate to its respective UITextField). So, yes, that means that if you have twelve buttons on each keyboard, and five text fields, then yes, you are instantiating 60 buttons. 12
    – Rob
    Apr 2 at 15:44
10

Building on Suragch's answer, I needed a done and backspace button and if you're a noob like me heres some errors you might encounter and the way I solved them.

Getting EXC_BAD_ACCESS errors? I included:

@objc(classname)
class classname: UIView{ 
}

fixed my issue however Suragch's updated answer seems to solve this the more appropriate/correct way.

Getting SIGABRT Error? Another silly thing was dragging the connections the wrong way, causing SIGABRT error. Do not drag from the function to the button but instead the button to the function.

Adding a Done Button I added this to the protocol in keyboard.swift:

protocol KeyboardDelegate: class {
    func keyWasTapped(character: String)
    func keyDone()
}

Then connected a new IBAction from my done button to keyboard.swift like so:

@IBAction func Done(sender: UIButton) {
    self.delegate?.keyDone()
}

and then jumped back to my viewController.swift where i am using this keyboard and added this following after the function keyWasTapped:

func keyDone() {
    view.endEditing(true)
}

Adding Backspace This tripped me up a lot, because you must set the textField.delegate to self in the viewDidLoad() method (shown later).

First: In keyboard.swift add to the protocol func backspace():

protocol KeyboardDelegate: class {
    func keyWasTapped(character: String)
    func keyDone()
    func backspace()
}

Second: Connect a new IBAction similar to the Done action:

@IBAction func backspace(sender: UIButton) {
    self.delegate?.backspace()
}

Third: Over to the viewController.swift where the NumberPad is appearing.

Important: In viewDidLoad() set all textFields that will be using this keyboard. So your viewDidLoad() should look something like this:

 override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    self.myTextField1.delegate = self
    self.myTextField2.delegate = self

    // initialize custom keyboard
    let keyboardView = keyboard(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 0, height: 240))
    keyboardView.delegate = self // the view controller will be notified by the keyboard whenever a key is tapped

    // replace system keyboard with custom keyboard
    myTextField1.inputView = keyboardView
    myTextField2.inputView = keyboardView
}

I'm not sure how to, if there is a way to just do this to all textFields that are in the view. This would be handy...

Forth: Still in viewController.swift we need to add a variable and two functions. It will look like this:

var activeTextField = UITextField()

func textFieldDidBeginEditing(textField: UITextField) {
    print("Setting Active Textfield")
    self.activeTextField = textField
    print("Active textField Set!")
}

func backspace() {
    print("backspaced!")
    activeTextField.deleteBackward()
}

Explanation of whats happening here:

  1. You make a variable that will hold a textField.
  2. When the "textFieldDidBeginEditing" is called it sets the variable so it knows which textField we are dealing with. I've added a lot of prints() so we know everything is being executed.
  3. Our backspace function then checks the textField we are dealing with and uses .deleteBackward(). This removes the immediate character before the cursor.

And you should be in business. Many thanks to Suragchs for helping me get this happening.

3
  • 1
    Use textField.deleteBackward() to backspace. If you are interested, here is a demo view controller and this is one of the keyboards that I use in it. It shows where I have come since first starting with the example here. I ended up abandoning nibs (for an unrelated reason) and just laying things out programmatically, though I don't necessary recommend that for you.
    – Suragch
    Feb 2 '16 at 14:08
  • if have two textfields.. so need a keyboard custom in first textfield and second textfield can keyboard default by iphone ?.. i wanna hide keyboard default and them show keyboard default
    – marlonpya
    Aug 22 '17 at 22:47
  • I'm not sure I understand your question marlonpya. If you want the default keyboard for one textfield then you do not need to address it in the viewDidLoad(). And then if you do want the custom keyboard for the other textfield then in viewDidLoad() you must set the textfield delegate to self and replace the keyboard with the custom keyboard as outlined in the third step above.
    – Steve
    Aug 23 '17 at 2:51

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